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Best sandpaper for sanding V brake pads?

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Best sandpaper for sanding V brake pads?

Old 08-14-18, 06:54 PM
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shine2000
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Best sandpaper for sanding V brake pads?

i have basic 100 type sandpaper for wood and wonder if its good to use with brakepads.
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Old 08-14-18, 08:07 PM
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A course file is better, since it doesn't leave bits behind. But yes, that would be rough enough.
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Old 08-14-18, 09:46 PM
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not a bad idea!
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Old 08-15-18, 12:38 AM
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I use 220 wet & dry.

Also for cleaning up rough alloy brake tracks.
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Old 08-15-18, 06:46 AM
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What ever I find first in the scraps on top of my tool box that seems rough enough
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Old 08-15-18, 08:29 AM
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I'm a 150 grit man myself. Aggressive enough to get the dirty top layer of rubber off of the pad, but not so coarse as to leave a rough surface. I don't have the patience to wait for 220 to get the job done.
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Old 08-15-18, 08:54 AM
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Carborundum grit, on cloth backing.

may want to use the wheel rim, as backing grit facing pad,

so as to preserve pad face being shaped to contact rim fully, thru use..

unless the rim itself, braking track, is flat, of course, then a file may be ideal.





...

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-15-18 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 08-15-18, 12:06 PM
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That's fine. Often the sandpaper from a patch kit is closest at hand and I'll use that.
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Old 08-17-18, 12:46 PM
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I steal a fingernail emery board from my wife. It's just the right grit, it's a convenient size, and it's nice and flat. Price is right too - even if you have to buy some.
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Old 08-17-18, 06:19 PM
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File, including a metal fingernail file if that's all you have around.

Not sandpaper or diamond embedded nail files, since both can leave abrasive stuff embedded in the brake pads.

Even with plain metal files it's a good idea to brush them clean first if they've been used before on metal surfaces.
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Old 08-17-18, 08:18 PM
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Since you're not trying to produce an aesthetic finish, and the first few miles will smooth out the sanding marks, I'd guess that any medium grade paper would work just fine for removing the glaze. You could rinse in water to remove the residual grit.
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Old 08-17-18, 08:33 PM
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Wow, you all are ambitious.

I just ride my bike, and the pads wear down quickly enough.

Actually, my new V-Brake pads seem to be awfully thin. They seem to be wearing OK, but I don't think I want to take away any more material.

The Caliper pads are much thicker, but, of course, shorter.
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Old 08-17-18, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Wow, you all are ambitious.

I just ride my bike, and the pads wear down quickly enough.
I've had it happen a few times, that vee-brake pads develop a ridge that catches on the rim. And of course I forgot to keep spare pads on hand. So I sand off the ridge and order new pads. When it's midnight and somebody needs the bike the next morning, you come up with quick fixes.

I've found vee-brakes to be more maintenance intensive than any other kind of brake.
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Old 08-17-18, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I've had it happen a few times, that vee-brake pads develop a ridge that catches on the rim.
A ridge at the top of the pad between the rim and tire? Out of adjustment?

That might be bothersome, but if needed, I might go after it with my pocket knife.

But, in some cases when pads weren't flat against the rims, they would wear to the proper position quickly.
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Old 08-17-18, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
A ridge at the top of the pad between the rim and tire? Out of adjustment?

That might be bothersome, but if needed, I might go after it with my pocket knife.

But, in some cases when pads weren't flat against the rims, they would wear to the proper position quickly.
Indeed, out of adjustment, just due to not keeping up with the family fleet. It's "everybody else's bike" because my bikes (by pure coincidence) don't have vee brakes. Perhaps due to having the fulcrum closer to brake pad, vee brakes may require more frequent adjustment as they wear.

Pocket knife would indeed do the trick, good idea.
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Old 08-18-18, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I'm a 150 grit man myself. Aggressive enough to get the dirty top layer of rubber off of the pad, but not so coarse as to leave a rough surface. I don't have the patience to wait for 220 to get the job done.
Yeah, that would be better for the pads,

but I just use 220 for all purpose- cleaning rims, deburring parts after the bike goes down, easing sharp edges, etc.
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Old 08-18-18, 12:32 PM
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Also sometimes revives old pads to file them down.
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Old 08-21-18, 03:44 AM
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Would this kind of refinishing help with very squealy cantilever brakes?
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Old 08-21-18, 07:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
Would this kind of refinishing help with very squealy cantilever brakes?
Yeah, but only about 50% of the time. It's usually the first thing that I try because it's fast and easy.
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Old 08-21-18, 09:40 PM
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wood rasp
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Old 08-22-18, 11:33 AM
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I also need to remove the pads and re-orient them so the are square to the rim from a tangential vantage point, and toe-ed in from a radial vantage point. I washed the rims not long ago.

The idea I saw here is that the different parts of the pad face might have different coefficients of friction, and therefore don't behave like new red Kool-stops should.
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Old 08-25-18, 10:41 AM
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3m silicon carbide medium grit "drywall sanding screen." One product does it all. Makes any and all pads, rubber or disc, like new, regardless of oil, silicone, glaze, as long as there's still clean pad wear remaining. Set pad on screen on flat surface, slide pad back and forth until like new. Voila. Hope this helps. Home Depot has these as do many other places.
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