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Anyone familiar with the ball bearings from VXB.com ?

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Anyone familiar with the ball bearings from VXB.com ?

Old 08-24-18, 06:19 PM
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Brocephus
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Anyone familiar with the ball bearings from VXB.com ?

While searching for info and sources for some (economical) replacement hub bearings, a thread on another forum recommended vxb.com, who sells supposedly bike-specific bearings (according to the site index).
These are grade 25, chrome bearings, but there's no mention of the exact steel, or the hardness.
As I understand, 55-65 HRC is around the ideal hardness, and AISI 420 is preferable to the softer 316 steel, but there's no mention of the hardness, or the exact steel, and since we're heading into the weekend, I can't call and ask.
Here's a link....
https://www.vxb.com/100-1-4-inch-Dia...-p/kit8593.htm
Assuming they're what they're supposed to be, these guys seem to be the best deal around, and their shipping is also reasonable.
Any good info is much appreciated.
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Old 08-24-18, 06:53 PM
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You are agonizing over minutia and there are no "bike specific" bearing balls.

AISI 420 is a hardenable stainless steel tool steel and is unnecessary for bicycle bearings. 316 is a high Ni/ high Cr stainless that cannot be heat treated and is used only where corrosion resistance trumps all other considerations. There is no need for it for bicycle bearings.

Most good quality bearing balls for standard service are AISI 52100 grade Cr steel and that is more than adequate for bike use. Grade 25 refers to roundness and is, again, a more than adequate quality. For that matter Grade 100 or even 200 balls (not as round) would be adequate.
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Old 08-24-18, 07:04 PM
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Bal-tec - Bearing Steel for Steel Balls
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Old 08-24-18, 08:09 PM
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VXB bearing balls are good.

It is not possible to get 316 SST anywhere near Rc 50. There are 316 balls available, but despite what some companies do/say; they are not suitable for bearing use.

420 SST is not used for ball bearings.

Bearing balls are 440C SST or 52100 Chrome Steel; 52100 is the preferred bearing steel, 440C is fractionally softer, and has slightly better corrosion resistance, but that is academic in a bearing where the ball is coated with grease, or has a pressurized oil feed.
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Old 08-24-18, 08:29 PM
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Old 08-24-18, 08:43 PM
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I order from VXB- cartridge bearings.

All good IME.
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Old 08-25-18, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by nfmisso View Post
420 SST is not used for ball bearings. Bearing balls are 440C SST....
Yeah, I should have caught that too.
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Old 08-25-18, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
You are agonizing over minutia and there are no "bike specific" bearing balls.

AISI 420 is a hardenable stainless steel tool steel and is unnecessary for bicycle bearings. 316 is a high Ni/ high Cr stainless that cannot be heat treated and is used only where corrosion resistance trumps all other considerations. There is no need for it for bicycle bearings.

Most good quality bearing balls for standard service are AISI 52100 grade Cr steel and that is more than adequate for bike use. Grade 25 refers to roundness and is, again, a more than adequate quality. For that matter Grade 100 or even 200 balls (not as round) would be adequate.
Hey, thanks for the solid info, but I honestly wasn't losing sleep over this, I'm just trying to get some factual info, and avoid buying any less-than-ideal bearings. I've read that G25 were sufficiently spherical, but any more precise than that would just be expensive overkill, and, that too hard or too soft had their own problems, as well.
Also, I didn't actually believe there were "bike specific bearings", I just used the term after reading that this company had a sub-category for bicycle-sized bearings (which is not to say, "bearings the size of bicycles", before someone pounces on that !! ).
Anyway, I think I got the info I needed, thanks again to you and the others for chiming in.
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Old 08-25-18, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
You are agonizing over minutia and there are no "bike specific" bearing balls.

AISI 420 is a hardenable stainless steel tool steel and is unnecessary for bicycle bearings. 316 is a high Ni/ high Cr stainless that cannot be heat treated and is used only where corrosion resistance trumps all other considerations. There is no need for it for bicycle bearings.

Most good quality bearing balls for standard service are AISI 52100 grade Cr steel and that is more than adequate for bike use. Grade 25 refers to roundness and is, again, a more than adequate quality. For that matter Grade 100 or even 200 balls (not as round) would be adequate.
Ditto.
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