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Tools??

Old 09-30-18, 04:13 PM
  #1  
robertj298
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Tools??

I really like my vintage bikes and am wondering what tools I need to start doing my own servicing such as wheel hubs, headset and bottom bracket.
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Old 09-30-18, 05:59 PM
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Tamiya
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
I really like my vintage bikes and am wondering what tools I need to start doing my own servicing such as wheel hubs, headset and bottom bracket.
go YouTube and search "Park Tools", they make the bestest DIY vids good place to learn each job & what tools & supplies you'd need if you're starting from scratch.

their tools are nearly as good too save for big dilemma between "Blue is Better" vs "China is Cheap carp" but you'll have to learn how to surf that trench yourself.

one can buy cheap(ish) "sets" of bike tools but most of those from dept stores won't last too long in regular use; they can be handy for occasional odd usage though - ie "better than nothing" if you can't find your good tool.

different bikes use various different size spanners too so if you have multiples or change bikes might need new tool sizes.

often it's also handy to have multiples of certain sizes of spanner


oh & oh & if you're playing with vintage BRITISH mades... they can use non international standard hex heads. I'm often dipping into my whitworth spanner cache when wrenching on old Raleigh.
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Old 09-30-18, 06:28 PM
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trailangel
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You need bike specific tools.
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Old 09-30-18, 07:11 PM
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Get a set of combination wrenches, Allen wrenches, sockets (all metric), basic screwdrivers, adjustable wrenches (8" and 12"), cable cutter anywhere. Bike specific tools will be 13 mm and 15 mm cone wrenches, whatever wrenches you need for your bottom bracket and freewheel or cassette, a spoke wrench, pedal wrench, crank puller, chain tool. I'm sure I've forgotten a few. I assume you have tire repair tools and supplies, but if not you'll want those too. Most basic headset servicing can be done with the adjustable wrenches, but replacement will need another set of special tools.

A work stand makes things real nice. You'll also need a can or tube of grease, chain oil, and solvent to clean old grease.

If you get into wheel building, that's another set of tools. Minor truing can be done on the bike.

Sometimes serious torque, heat, and/or impact is needed to loosen a bottom bracket fixed cup, pedal, stripped crank, or corroded seat post.

Some important work like adjusting brakes and derailleurs need more skill than tools. Brake maintenance and adjustment are probably the most important things to learn. Good tires and strong wheels are very important too.
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Old 10-02-18, 12:12 PM
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Only buy bike specific tools you need, example a crank puller. Always buy regular hand tools, example screwdrivers from a tool store because they are cheaper.
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Old 10-02-18, 02:32 PM
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I suggest waiting to buy until needed. Also, as you get into it, you can be selective of bikes and parts that use tools you already have on hand.
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Old 10-02-18, 05:03 PM
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The shop I worked in for 30 plus years had a box filled with old shop tools that we used in the shop and had been replaced with upgraded tools. My entire workbench here at home is supplied by those tools. We sold them for a buck a piece. The cone wrenches are a bit sketchy, however they still work. Check to see if a shop in your area has something like this going on. The shop I work part time in now does not do this. Not sure what they do with the old tools. As for wire cutters, Channel Lock has a good side cutter, but Snap-On is superior, just costs a lot more. Falco has the best housing cutter, the Park is acceptable for home use and is what I use. Make sure to get a JIS Phillips head screw driver, not a #2 Phillips.
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Old 10-03-18, 04:39 AM
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
Get a set of combination wrenches, Allen wrenches, sockets (all metric), basic screwdrivers, adjustable wrenches (8" and 12"), cable cutter anywhere. Bike specific tools will be 13 mm and 15 mm cone wrenches, whatever wrenches you need for your bottom bracket and freewheel or cassette, a spoke wrench, pedal wrench, crank puller, chain tool. I'm sure I've forgotten a few. I assume you have tire repair tools and supplies, but if not you'll want those too. Most basic headset servicing can be done with the adjustable wrenches, but replacement will need another set of special tools.

A work stand makes things real nice. You'll also need a can or tube of grease, chain oil, and solvent to clean old grease.

If you get into wheel building, that's another set of tools. Minor truing can be done on the bike.

Sometimes serious torque, heat, and/or impact is needed to loosen a bottom bracket fixed cup, pedal, stripped crank, or corroded seat post.

Some important work like adjusting brakes and derailleurs need more skill than tools. Brake maintenance and adjustment are probably the most important things to learn. Good tires and strong wheels are very important too.

Older american bikes were SAE not metric so it all depends on what the OP thinks is vintage
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Old 10-04-18, 08:42 PM
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Anybody f with the wish app?



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Old 10-04-18, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
I really like my vintage bikes and am wondering what tools I need to start doing my own servicing such as wheel hubs, headset and bottom bracket.
Since you mentioned wheel hubs first, I would start there. Buy a set of cone wrenches and rebuild a set of hubs.

Front hub cones are usually smaller than the rear. 13mm, 14mm, 15mm and 16mm wrenches should cover both. You'll also need either a set of combination wrenches (one side open, one side box-end)...or...a 8" or 10" adjustable wrench.

Once you get the hubs apart, you'll need a small container, rags and some solvent to clean the axles, cones and bearings. A toothbrush is good for cleaning the threaded portion of the axles.

Park Waterproof Grease is what I use to repack the bearings.

Once you've mastered rebuilding hubs, you can move on to the bottom bracket saving the headset for last which in my opinion takes slightly more skill and patience.
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