Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Reflating a puncture w/o repairing it

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Reflating a puncture w/o repairing it

Old 10-02-18, 10:28 AM
  #1  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,012
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Reflating a puncture w/o repairing it

Lets say your riding thru a bad neighborhood, and sudenly you get a flat tire.

Is it bad for the tube, if you reinflate the tire without removing the nail from the tire?

Hoping your tire can hold pressure until you get thru the rough neighborhood.
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 10:55 AM
  #2  
rosefarts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 654
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 43 Times in 15 Posts
Most likely, you didn't stop until the tire was flat, not the second you ran over whatever thing it is.

If you have sealant in the tubes, or tubeless with sealant, this would work fine. You may not even need to top up.

If you have a regular tube with a hole in it, reinflating won't get you far. If it's a hand pump, most likely you'd be losing air at about the same rate as you fill. If you have a CO2, you'd get the tube filled and it'd be flat 100 feet down the road. If you absolutely must not stop, you'll have to ride flat. It will almost certainly damage the rim. It sort of depends on terrain and luck as to how severe of damage you get.

If you find yourself frequently riding through neighborhoods you can't stop (or in my case, roads that have rattlesnakes and scorpions on the side), sealant is your best bet. Tubeless or not is totally up to debate but you need something that will keep you moving in all but a catastrophic flat. I'd also suggest finding a better neighborhood to ride through if you can.
rosefarts is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 10:56 AM
  #3  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 38,025

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1811 Post(s)
Liked 131 Times in 79 Posts
In my experience with goatheads, sometimes your better option is to leave it in, add sealant, pump up, and keep going.
caloso is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 11:07 AM
  #4  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,261
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
If you absolutely must not stop, you'll have to ride flat. It will almost certainly damage the rim.
Hasn't been my experience. I've ridden on a flat tire for several miles a few times (the longest was just over 6 miles). No damage to the rim or even to the tire as a result. If it's a front tire you need to be very careful that the tire doesn't squirm off the rim and jam in the fork. And take it slow in any event, but it may well be better than stopping immediately in an area where you aren't comfortable.
prathmann is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 11:22 AM
  #5  
Rootman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NW Arkansas, USA
Posts: 1,034

Bikes: 2015 Giant Roam 2 Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
That's on other nice thing about disk brakes, on less thing for a tire that pops off the rim to jam in and tear off.

I've been in this situation and luckily the leak was slow enough that I could make it a few miles to a place that I could fix it. It's amazing how much better you get at flat changing with practice .

Generally on good old fashioned tubes and tires you are pretty well flat after a puncture of nearly any size. So, it's either fix it or hoof it.
Rootman is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 12:51 PM
  #6  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,012
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Let me be more specific...it's not my bike. If you're helping a fellow bicyclist on the side of the road...do you:
(1) just pump up to full pressure and see if it holds air enough, or
(2) always remove the nail and patch it?




Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
Most likely,
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
In my experience with goatheads,
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
Hasn't been my experience. .
Originally Posted by Rootman View Post
That's on other nice thing aboeither fix it or hoof it.

Last edited by mtb_addict; 10-02-18 at 12:55 PM.
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 01:31 PM
  #7  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,947
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 813 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Let me be more specific...it's not my bike. If you're helping a fellow bicyclist on the side of the road...do you:
(1) just pump up to full pressure and see if it holds air enough, or
(2) always remove the nail and patch it?
I hand over the most similar spare tube Iím carrying, and ask If (s)he wants some help installing it. Roadside patching is something I try to avoid.
If it comes to that, Iíd ask If it was a slow leak, and if (s)he has a pump. If (s)he hasnít got a pump, that kinda limits the options. Either fix the flat/replace the tube. Or escort the flat-stricken rider to someplace to bail out or another place to fix/replace the tube.
If it was a fast leak, there isnít much of a choice apart from patch/replace tube.
Stopping once every block for a 2-minute pumping session will begin to add exposure fairly soon.
dabac is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 01:54 PM
  #8  
AnkleWork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Llano Estacado
Posts: 3,326

Bikes: old clunker

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 539 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 15 Posts
Welcome to the hypothetical fantasy problem chat forum.
AnkleWork is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 02:05 PM
  #9  
base2 
Senior Member
 
base2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 973

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 65 Times in 45 Posts
Define: "Bad neighborhood."

In most actual "bad neighborhood"s I've come across most people are anti-social and keen to ignore anything thats not their business. Factor that in to the bike is currently broken (ie not worth stealing) & being tended to by it's owner (ie not worth the hassle)

I'd stop anytime, anywhere. I wouldn't necessarily advertise my presence or be overly social. I'd do my business in a public place away from the obvious bad elements & move on.

This culture of fear we have embraced is just sad.
base2 is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 02:08 PM
  #10  
Berg417448
Troublemaker
 
Berg417448's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Earth
Posts: 427

Bikes: Yes. The more the better.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Let me be more specific...it's not my bike. If you're helping a fellow bicyclist on the side of the road...do you:
(1) just pump up to full pressure and see if it holds air enough, or
(2) always remove the nail and patch it?

I put a new tube in and repair the punctured tube when I get home.
Berg417448 is online now  
Old 10-02-18, 04:11 PM
  #11  
deacon mark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,464

Bikes: Habanero Titanium Team Nuevo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
New tube and repair at home. If I have two flats then I have and iPhone to call.
deacon mark is offline  
Old 10-02-18, 04:24 PM
  #12  
Jon T
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: West Orange County, CA
Posts: 993

Bikes: '84 Peugeot PH10LE

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 351 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts
If the hole is too big to patch, or you don't have a patch kit, there's always the quick-fix "knot" method. Not pretty and it'll put a lump in your tire you'll feel wth every revolution, but it will get you out of immediate trouble and maybe even all the way home.
Jon
Jon T is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 11:51 AM
  #13  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,902

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3024 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 87 Posts
I came across a young man w a low tire one time. I helped him pump it up & he took off happy as can be. does this help?
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 12:22 PM
  #14  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,012
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I came across a young man w a low tire one time. I helped him pump it up & he took off happy as can be. does this help?
That was my original question: are you helping or hurting? Pumping w/o patching...is it going to put a second hole into the tube, which makes patching more difficult, or imporssible, later?
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 12:23 PM
  #15  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,012
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3011 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by Jon T View Post
there's always the quick-fix "knot" method.
No idea you could do that. I'll have to add that into my skill set.
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 01:57 PM
  #16  
Crankycrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,341
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Not my favorite type of patch but glueless patches would be perfect for this situation. If they don't have a quick release axle on their bike and you know where the puncture is you can just pull that section of tube out, throw on the patch, pump it up and off they go.
Crankycrank is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 02:09 PM
  #17  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,902

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3024 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
That was my original question: are you helping or hurting? Pumping w/o patching...is it going to put a second hole into the tube, which makes patching more difficult, or imporssible, later?
well if you are afraid of getting mugged & inflating w/o fixing gets you outta there, then do that
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 02:41 PM
  #18  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,468
Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8502 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 60 Posts
I can't think of any neighborhood around here that I wouldn't feel comfortable repairing a flat. And, sometimes helpful people can be surprising.

If there is a place that is dark, or something that I don't like, then perhaps walking a quarter mile to a nicer place.

If you are planning on throwing away the flatted tube, then there is no reason to worry about damaging it.

Of course, riding with something causing a flat would depend on the actual item. I rarely pick up nails or screws. However, I picked this one up a month or so ago.



I discovered it very quickly because it was pinging on the brakes. Once I took it out, the holes in the tire were barely visible.

If I had tried to ride the 10 miles home on it, I'd undoubtedly have been pumping it several times, and probably torn a chunk out of the tire, as well as battering up my brakes.

And, of course, riding on super low tires also risks rim damage, and tire damage from riding on your sidewalls.

Some people with big screws or nails in their tires also report rim damage. So, watch what you're riding on.

All that said, a lot depends on the tire and tube. I've had high volume tires that will take a week or so to leak out. So, pump, do my ride, then come back and repeat the next time I'm headed out.

If I get a flat a couple of miles from home, I'll frequently try to baby it home. Pump up, ride 1/2 mile, pump up, another half mile... etc. I believe the success of doing so depends a lot on tube size. So, using a small tube in a large tire will tend to open the hole up for a fast leak. Using as big of a tube as will fit into a tire will tend to keep the hole closed.

In fact, that is what Michelin is trying to do with their Protek Tubes. The idea is for the tube to have pressure in the sides to force it to seal around anything puncturing it. I haven't tried them myself as flats are enough to encourage one to be prepared, but rare enough not to be a huge inconvenience.

CliffordK is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 08:50 PM
  #19  
AtNjineer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Welcome to the hypothetical fantasy problem chat forum.
yes some people have forethought

my advice is donít bother doing repairs until your home or passed the area that you donít want to be in.
I live in la I know how it is. Just keep pumping it up until your home and then take it apart. If your lucky enough to know you have a puncture before you get to a bad area. Fill it up good and hope you donít have to stop and fill it up again until your out of that area.
AtNjineer is offline  
Old 10-04-18, 09:19 PM
  #20  
AtNjineer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Just seent dis lol




AtNjineer is offline  
Old 10-05-18, 10:15 AM
  #21  
TallRider
Senior Member
 
TallRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 4,433
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by AtNjineer View Post
[pictures of some kind of sealant product]
You posted this in another thread. And sealant certainly makes it more likely you can just keep riding. I don't know that 4 screenshots of a product claiming to be new and groundbreaking is worth posting though.
TallRider is offline  
Old 10-26-18, 11:56 AM
  #22  
freeranger
Senior Member
 
freeranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,177

Bikes: 06 Lemond Reno, 98 GT Timberline mtn.bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
Maybe use tubes with sealant already in them-not cheap, but might allow you to keep rolling. Ex: https://www.flatattack.com/#sealant
freeranger is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
superduper54
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
8
07-03-09 01:48 PM
alwaysbefirst
Road Cycling
1
07-25-05 03:26 PM
jeff williams
Mountain Biking
0
01-12-05 09:26 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.