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Chainstay removal

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Old 11-06-18, 10:39 AM
  #26  
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Well then it's Aberlour double cask if you are successful on this.
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Old 11-06-18, 11:14 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
You are correct of course. No idea what I was thinking. The mention of a spindle seems to have confused me
Well, the bike biz is a tad more dynamic than the periodic system. A fella might be excused for not remembering, or even ever knowing the particulars of each and every make & model out there.
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Old 11-06-18, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Lister View Post
Thanks Asi, some excellent ideas here. As you said, the limiting factor here will be the ID measurement which I haven't checked but won't be bigger than 12 mm, so not much to work with.
At 12mm is plenty of room.

Your best option (and cheap) is to visit the hardware store for an expanding concrete anchor with the sleeve OD a mm or two smaller. I know some are 8mm sleeve with M6 stud, or 10mm sleeve with M8 stud, or 12mm sleeve with M10 stud.. or bigger.
Here is the catch about these anchors: some rely on friction to install other on pure draw force against the sleeve. You want the full sleeve one with two or four slits near the end (some have weird middle collapsible portion - avoid them). Also there is the bolt type that draws the tapered nut, or the stud type with a tapered head and tighten the nut on outside. You want the stud type with longer threads (to accommodate at least three nuts on it and a washer).

Prepare the anchor: wrap the sleeve (especially on the expanding part - on the slits on the end of the sleeve) with some rubber from inner tube or similar. (for grip and not to marr the surface and to distribute the force evenly). Put the washer against the sleeve and the original nut it came with but do not tighten it. Put two nuts on the very end of the stud and tighten them against each-other so you can grip these nuts to keep the stud from rotating in the sleeve and not tension your spindle in the tightening direction.
Insert this anchor in the spindle having a close fit (the closer the better) the expanding part can cover sever millimeters but at higher distance it will grab just two or 4 sharper points rather than a close to circle grab.

Keep the stud from rotating with a wrench on those two nuts on the end (preferably the middle one) - or just some vice grips on those end threads if you don't mind mushing the threads on the end and slowly tighten the nut against the sleeve while inside the spindle. Don't go crazy with it.. just a bit then grab the middle nut and keep the spindle from rotating while undoing the allen bolt on the other side. If it starts to slip, add another half a turn or so to the nut closest to the sleeve to tighten it more.

So the anchor i suggest is this type: https://www.aliexpress.com/store/pro...976714946.html




(note: has nut on the outside with a full sleeve and a washer and a nut. the higher quality ones have partial sleeve and rely on friction with the concrete to keep the sleeve from turning having a flush anchor on outside while the cheaper models with full sleeve need a dedicated nut and washer protruding on outside - but in your case the cheaper type is the way better option)

Last edited by Asi; 11-06-18 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 11-08-18, 05:41 PM
  #29  
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Old 11-08-18, 08:04 PM
  #30  
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10th post (again)
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Old 11-08-18, 08:05 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
Hahahaha! ...the implication being???
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Old 11-08-18, 09:40 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Asi View Post
At 12mm is plenty of room.

Your best option (and cheap) is to visit the hardware store for an expanding concrete anchor with the sleeve OD a mm or two smaller. I know some are 8mm sleeve with M6 stud, or 10mm sleeve with M8 stud, or 12mm sleeve with M10 stud.. or bigger.
Here is the catch about these anchors: some rely on friction to install other on pure draw force against the sleeve. You want the full sleeve one with two or four slits near the end (some have weird middle collapsible portion - avoid them). Also there is the bolt type that draws the tapered nut, or the stud type with a tapered head and tighten the nut on outside. You want the stud type with longer threads (to accommodate at least three nuts on it and a washer).

Prepare the anchor: wrap the sleeve (especially on the expanding part - on the slits on the end of the sleeve) with some rubber from inner tube or similar. (for grip and not to marr the surface and to distribute the force evenly). Put the washer against the sleeve and the original nut it came with but do not tighten it. Put two nuts on the very end of the stud and tighten them against each-other so you can grip these nuts to keep the stud from rotating in the sleeve and not tension your spindle in the tightening direction.
Insert this anchor in the spindle having a close fit (the closer the better) the expanding part can cover sever millimeters but at higher distance it will grab just two or 4 sharper points rather than a close to circle grab.

Keep the stud from rotating with a wrench on those two nuts on the end (preferably the middle one) - or just some vice grips on those end threads if you don't mind mushing the threads on the end and slowly tighten the nut against the sleeve while inside the spindle. Don't go crazy with it.. just a bit then grab the middle nut and keep the spindle from rotating while undoing the allen bolt on the other side. If it starts to slip, add another half a turn or so to the nut closest to the sleeve to tighten it more.

So the anchor i suggest is this type: https://www.aliexpress.com/store/pro...976714946.html




(note: has nut on the outside with a full sleeve and a washer and a nut. the higher quality ones have partial sleeve and rely on friction with the concrete to keep the sleeve from turning having a flush anchor on outside while the cheaper models with full sleeve need a dedicated nut and washer protruding on outside - but in your case the cheaper type is the way better option)
You suggested a concrete anchor, which I repeatedly referred to as a bolt, to secure the right side part of the swingarm spindle so I could loosen the left side of it. Despite getting good purchase between the outer part of the anchor and the spindle there is no rotational grip between the outer and inner parts of the anchor so this idea hasn't worked.
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Old 11-09-18, 12:02 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
Trek Slash 8 swingarm spindle removed
At long last the swingarm spindle is out! The problem has been the assumption that it is in two parts as per the design of the Fuel model, it is not. In trying to tap out the concrete anchor which was jammed tightly in the inside diameter of the spindle, the spindle itself began to move. I have tried this previously but with nowhere near the kind of force that is required to move it, all that was needed from the start was a good solid wooden drift and a bloody big hammer!
Prepare with Glenmorangie and a big dose of determination.

Last edited by Lister; 11-09-18 at 12:06 AM.
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Old 11-09-18, 12:18 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Well then it's Aberlour double cask if you are successful on this.
I don't know the Aberlour but here's what did the trick.
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Old 11-09-18, 01:03 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Lister View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oArQsfoEWQ
You suggested a concrete anchor, which I repeatedly referred to as a bolt, to secure the right side part of the swingarm spindle so I could loosen the left side of it. Despite getting good purchase between the outer part of the anchor and the spindle there is no rotational grip between the outer and inner parts of the anchor so this idea hasn't worked.
Hmm.. yes it's just friction between the tapered steel bolt and the sleeve (also steel - not enough friction there). Try inserting the concrete anchor less so that you can grip the sleeve on the outside with vice grips and hold by the vicegrips - if now turns, then you should tighten more the base nut of the anchor.
Hope that works.

LE: Congrats for taking that thing out. So it is a solid hollow axle pressfit in the swingarm bearings? That doesn't look very safe to me. (i'd sure try to put a nut on the end)

Last edited by Asi; 11-09-18 at 01:16 AM.
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Old 11-11-18, 03:29 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Asi View Post
Hmm.. yes it's just friction between the tapered steel bolt and the sleeve (also steel - not enough friction there). Try inserting the concrete anchor less so that you can grip the sleeve on the outside with vice grips and hold by the vicegrips - if now turns, then you should tighten more the base nut of the anchor.
Hope that works.

LE: Congrats for taking that thing out. So it is a solid hollow axle pressfit in the swingarm bearings? That doesn't look very safe to me. (i'd sure try to put a nut on the end)
It does have a nut on the end which I took to be more of a dust cover, It's very light, plus the fact that it's a 10 mm allen head in the end of the spindle made me think that it was designed to deal with vastly more than securing a dust cover! Plus the diagram of the Top Fuel which shows the nut at the end of the spindle screwing into the ID of the spindle (so, in fact, a bolt) making it a two part assembly.
Older and and wiser.
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