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White Lightning Dry vs. Finish Line Teflon Dry

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White Lightning Dry vs. Finish Line Teflon Dry

Old 02-25-20, 11:46 AM
  #26  
canklecat
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Originally Posted by stephr1 View Post
...Out of curiosity...what kind of wax do you use? I have some left over from when I used to rewax my downhill skis. Any similarities?
I don't know what's in ski wax. I use Gulf wax, same stuff my grandma used for canning vegetables and fruits. It's just food grade white paraffin.

Some hot wax fans experiment with additives, including solvents (variously described as paraffin oil, lamp oil, etc) to soften the Gulf wax, which is roughly like hard soap. I experimented with leftover wax from scented candles, which already contains some softeners. But I couldn't tell whether the additives made any difference. And over time road grime from the used chains contaminated the wax so after two years I'll discard it and start over. I never tried the boiling water method, which might have extended the useful life of the wax.

Some folks add powdered PTFE ("Teflon") and/or molybdenum disulfide, but opinions vary over whether these improve the wax significantly. The Australian guy with a YouTube channel on chain waxing reports his best results from adding PTFE powder to plain paraffin. I just got some PTFE powder and plan to try it with hot wax soon.

Once the chain is stripped of all lubes, greases, etc., the hot wax method is pretty easy. For me, living in an apartment now, it's impractical to store the flammable degreasers that would be most effective. I might try the caustic soda method.

Meanwhile, the Rock 'N' Roll Absolute Dry works pretty well. It's the least bad of the many wet lubes I've tried. Seems pricey since it appears to be just PTFE powder in naptha, which I could homebrew cheaply. And it doesn't go far. I'd probably go through a 4 ounce bottle every month, applying it as directed on my two road bike chains. They recommend applying it generously each time,which probably helps clean the chain and get the PTFE to penetrate. But 4 oz won't go far used that way.

I can see why NFS (NixFrixShun) has its fans. It's intended to be applied sparingly, a single drop per link, and reportedly lasts a long time. That application method seems too tedious, but perhaps it's less trouble over the long run if it doesn't need to be done very often.

See this PDF report of chain lube tests by Friction Facts/Ceramic Speed.

Last edited by canklecat; 02-25-20 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 02-25-20, 12:44 PM
  #27  
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Funny you should ask. A few years back, I started a long thread about a "crunching" sound in my drive-train that I could not explain or eliminate. Several good techs looked at the bike and could not figure out what was causing the crunch either. After about two seasons of putting up with this disconcerting noise, I decided to try going back to the "dry" White Lightning lube I had been using for many years before someone gave me the bottle of Finish Line Teflon lube I had been using more recently. Like magic, the crunch immediately went away and my bike started shifting smoother and faster, too. I have used nothing but White Lightning since then and have had no problems.

I don't think this was a coincidence, but I'm sure others will have stories about the same thing happening with the products reversed.
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Old 02-25-20, 06:13 PM
  #28  
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OK. I considered the idea of waxing my chain some time ago. You've convinced me it's something I might want to reconsider. I do have a garage and a place to work (that is not a kitchen or dining room table

Haven't done any research on it either, but I have a sense that the characteristics of ski wax just might lend itself to chain lubing. To wit:

1. Ski wax is designed to provide a slick surface between the skis and the snow.
So maybe this can provide a fairly good slick surface between chain moving parts/links (tho, we're talking about a kind of plastic on the skis against frozen water as compared to metal on metal)

2. Ski wax is designed to be somewhat durable
This might offer longevity of lubrication for riding.

3. Ski wax is easily melted (still have my wax melting/application roller tool)

Maybe not exactly ski wax (which I presume is much more expensive than plain old paraffin). It's also possible (again, have not done research into this) that some combination of the additives contained in ski wax may be applicable for bike chains, as well.

If anyone has investigated this, I'd be interested in seeing the analysis.

Cheers.....


Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
I don't know what's in ski wax. I use Gulf wax, same stuff my grandma used for canning vegetables and fruits. It's just food grade white paraffin.

Some hot wax fans experiment with additives, including solvents (variously described as paraffin oil, lamp oil, etc) to soften the Gulf wax, which is roughly like hard soap. I experimented with leftover wax from scented candles, which already contains some softeners. But I couldn't tell whether the additives made any difference. And over time road grime from the used chains contaminated the wax so after two years I'll discard it and start over. I never tried the boiling water method, which might have extended the useful life of the wax.

Some folks add powdered PTFE ("Teflon") and/or molybdenum disulfide, but opinions vary over whether these improve the wax significantly. The Australian guy with a YouTube channel on chain waxing reports his best results from adding PTFE powder to plain paraffin. I just got some PTFE powder and plan to try it with hot wax soon.

Once the chain is stripped of all lubes, greases, etc., the hot wax method is pretty easy. For me, living in an apartment now, it's impractical to store the flammable degreasers that would be most effective. I might try the caustic soda method.

Meanwhile, the Rock 'N' Roll Absolute Dry works pretty well. It's the least bad of the many wet lubes I've tried. Seems pricey since it appears to be just PTFE powder in naptha, which I could homebrew cheaply. And it doesn't go far. I'd probably go through a 4 ounce bottle every month, applying it as directed on my two road bike chains. They recommend applying it generously each time,which probably helps clean the chain and get the PTFE to penetrate. But 4 oz won't go far used that way.

I can see why NFS (NixFrixShun) has its fans. It's intended to be applied sparingly, a single drop per link, and reportedly lasts a long time. That application method seems too tedious, but perhaps it's less trouble over the long run if it doesn't need to be done very often.

See this PDF report of chain lube tests by Friction Facts/Ceramic Speed.
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Old 02-26-20, 12:02 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by stephr1 View Post
UPDATE: Just wanted to add here that I did find a review (albeit ~4 years old) on-line that compared White Lightning Clean Lube (or something similar with a slightly different name), Finish Line Dry and a few others. It seemed both were rated pretty good at longevity/durability and cleanliness, with Finish Line Dry lasting somewhat longer.

I'd still be interested in individual experiences and opinions. Thx.

Did find some threads that were more esoteric about chain lube but didn't find a specific topic related to this (I will admit I may not have looked as hard as I could have so just have a simple inquiry....(BTW - if there is such a fairly recent thread I'm happy to follow a link to it...thx).

I've been using White Lightning Dry lube (think it's called "Clean Ride" these days) which claims to have a wax-based lubricant (a few of the threads I found here did tout the benefits of wax lubring). I usually found it on sale at Performance Bike. When I needed to get more chain lube recently, White Lightning wasn't on sale but Finish Line Dry (which uses teflon as its lube component) was.

So, question is: which is better? Do you have experience with one or the other (or both is better) and what is your opinion about either?

Thx in advance and cheers......
Iíve used both as well as several other supposedly dry film, wax based lubes. There is only one bike chain specific, wax based lube that actually had a liquid film carrier that drys leaving the chain internally coated with a hybrid dry wax. Itís insanely expensive, but it it an alternative to hot wax dipping. That is UFO Drip.

Neither of the lubes you are asking about are truly dry lubes. Neither dry completely, and neither last very long even in dry conditions. Both tend to gunk up and require a lot of chain cleaning. Neither are in any way comparable to true wax lubes. Which is not to say they wonít lube your chain, just donít think your waxing your chain. I prefer Finishline products to White Lightning though as they work better and last longer.

This is my experience. Opinions are going to be all over the place, and there isnít an easy one solution for all even when it comes to something as simple and old as chain maintenance. If youíre happy that what really matters.
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Old 02-26-20, 06:21 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Sapperc View Post
Iíve used both as well as several other supposedly dry film, wax based lubes. There is only one bike chain specific, wax based lube that actually had a liquid film carrier that drys leaving the chain internally coated with a hybrid dry wax. Itís insanely expensive, but it it an alternative to hot wax dipping. That is UFO Drip.
.
FWIW, I ordered a bottle of Pedro's "Slick Wax".. which seems to at least somewhat fit your description for UFO.. no idea yet how it would compare as I haven't tried yet.
https://pedros.com/faqs/differences-slick-wax-ice-wax/
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