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Best chain cleaning tool?

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Best chain cleaning tool?

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Old 12-30-18, 11:13 AM
  #51  
Racing Dan
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
question for u guys who use bottle and solvent and the shakes...

what do you do with the solvent after ward? throw the bottle into the trash can?
Collect it in a recycled glass jar with at lid and let it sit still, and you can reuse the solvent several times. In the end you should dispose of it at your city collection place. Ppl tend to forget they shouldn't dispose of simple green in the drain either, if its contaminated with oil.
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Old 12-30-18, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
question for u guys who use bottle and solvent and the shakes...

what do you do with the solvent after ward? throw the bottle into the trash can?
Collect it and dispose of it via my community toxic chemicals disposal system. However, a cup of mineral spirits will clean about a dozen chains. I clean the chain once...when I install it...and the chains last me around 3000 miles. With 8 bikes, it takes me quite a long time to wear out a chain...sometimes many years...so I don’t have a lot of need to dispose of the cleaning solvent. My highest mileage bike gets about 1500 miles per year so it takes 3+ years between cleaning. My other chains can take between 5 and 10 years between replacement so it might take 10 to 15 years before I have to dispose of a cup of mineral spirits.

I have a quart of fresh mineral spirits that is at least 10 years old and only partially used.
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Old 12-30-18, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Racing Dan View Post
Ppl tend to forget they shouldn't dispose of simple green in the drain either, if its contaminated with oil.
A good point that I didnít bring up in my previous post. In strictly legal terms, the water that is used for rinsing should be treated as the same kind of waste as the Simple Green that is used for removing the oil.
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Old 01-03-19, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Stuart- Yes I completely agree. I said as much in another (of the many) chain cleaning threads a number of months ago. But I was kind of put down for being so blasphemous. Cleaning a chain with a rag is so often quoted AS the way, by so many including a lot of the LBS workers I have shared a paycheck with. In my view it's pretty obvious, I could never understand why others didn't see this too. Andy
happy new year fellers

I'm a rag user, and while I get the point you guys are bringing up, being a lazy son of a gun, I can't be bothered doing the solvent thing, but honestly I've always found that using a thinner lube like tri flow, and regular wipes to keep excess down and so less stuck on particles, means very little stuck on stuff getting pushed into the chain. I have no problem taking five or ten seconds after every ride to do a light wipe, have loads of old shirts, tea towels etc in the garage.
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Old 01-03-19, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
..pun intended, here's a couple more links.. I'm not sure where you get your info? This is from a manufacturer's site.
https://store.kmcchain.us/p/missinglink-10r?pp=8
https://store.kmcchain.us/p/missinglink-9r?pp=8



I think the simple answer is really, eg. for KMC anyway, that they sell both Reusable and Non-Reusable variants. Read the product descriptions for the answer.
Same for SRAM. Their Powerlinks are reusable but they claim their Powerlocks are one time use only. Of course I've removed my chains a dozen times using the same Powerlocks. Still no explosions or collapse of civilization.
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Old 01-04-19, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Nightdiver View Post
Same for SRAM. Their Powerlinks are reusable but they claim their Powerlocks are one time use only. Of course I've removed my chains a dozen times using the same Powerlocks. Still no explosions or collapse of civilization.
I wouldn't take a chance with injury if that breaks while your sprinting, you might face plant.
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Old 01-04-19, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
...I'm a rag user, and while I get the point you guys are bringing up, being a lazy son of a gun, I can't be bothered doing the solvent thing, but honestly I've always found that using a thinner lube like tri flow, and regular wipes to keep excess down and so less stuck on particles, means very little stuck on stuff getting pushed into the chain...
I get it. I'm a drip and wipe guy also, and have done this for 45 years of bike riding. I've created my own concoction of runny lubricant that penetrates pretty well and seems to flush out a lot of contaminants from within the rollers and pins. BUT, I'll be the first to admit that I don't get a high amount of mileage from a chain, which is the point of removing and cleaning thoroughly. I'm replacing chains every 1500 miles or so on my commuter and my main road bike, both 11 speed. I measure chain elongation as a part of my routine maintenance...
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Old 01-04-19, 01:04 PM
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Phil, since riding more regularly and keeping track more or less of mileage, since the 7 speed days, I've tended to get about 5000kms between chain changes, using the elongation measure technique. 5000km for sure on 9 speed stuff, maybe longer a bit on 7 and 8, but 5000km is a reasonable consistent average.
But I'm a light guy, keep a drivetrain clean as a rule and am not riding in sandy or dirt roads that much.

Only have one bike with ten speed in the family, and it only has maybe 2000kms on it tops.
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Old 01-07-19, 06:27 PM
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Can I jump in with a quick question here? I just removed my chain and used OMS to clean it in a plastic bottle. Changed out the solvent 5-6 times until it remained fairly clear. I was surprised when I replaced the chain that I could still hear lots of grinding between the links when I gave it a twist back and forth. I was expecting perfection from the cleaning process but obviously didn;t get it. Is this normal? Did I miss something or should I set my sights a little lower?
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Old 01-07-19, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
Can I jump in with a quick question here? I just removed my chain and used OMS to clean it in a plastic bottle. Changed out the solvent 5-6 times until it remained fairly clear. I was surprised when I replaced the chain that I could still hear lots of grinding between the links when I gave it a twist back and forth. I was expecting perfection from the cleaning process but obviously didn;t get it. Is this normal? Did I miss something or should I set my sights a little lower?
so much for the enviro-friendliness angle of OMS reusability..
Did you lube the chain after doing this cleaning?
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Old 01-07-19, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...if you have one, an ultrasonic cleaner works well for this. But you have to be very thorough in relubricating your chain, and vigilant in making certain the chain interior spaces are completely dry before you relubricate or the lube will not penetrate to where it needs to be.

The plastic soda bottle is a lot cheaper, works just about as well, and will preclude your purchase of an ultrasonic cleaner. I used one for years, and still will from time to time unless it's worth setting up the ultrasonic because I have other stuff to clean in it.

If you do use an ultrasonic, you can just seal the chain into a smaller container or Ziploc bag with the mineral spirits or your chosen solvent like simple green, then fill the rest of the cleaner chamber with water.

What is an ultrasonic cleaner? I'm a bit of a novice.
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Old 01-07-19, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
so much for the enviro-friendliness angle of OMS reusability..
Did you lube the chain after doing this cleaning?
I'm still hoping to be able to reuse the mineral spirits after the contaminants settle out.
I manipulated the chain and felt/heard the grit before applying lube - but the lube is coming next, before my morning commute. Will a freshly cleaned chain always have this residual grit or should it be more like new?
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Old 01-07-19, 10:25 PM
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I just went back out to the shed to take a second look at the chain and give it the lube. I'm happy to report that the grit appears to be on the chainring and not in the chain. The sensation of the grit was transmitted through the chain from the (not-as-clean) chainring to where my fingers held the chain, halfway between the chainring in the front and the cogs in the back. So, I'm feeling better about my first cleaning now and looking forward to refining my technique.

Eugew23, I haven never used an ultrasonic cleaner but it appears to be an appliance that holds a liquid bath in which small items are submerged. There must be some sort of energy wave passed through the liquid which "scrubs" the (in this case) chain. It sounds like they do a very good job of cleaning a chain.
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Old 01-08-19, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
Can I jump in with a quick question here? I just removed my chain and used OMS to clean it in a plastic bottle. Changed out the solvent 5-6 times until it remained fairly clear. I was surprised when I replaced the chain that I could still hear lots of grinding between the links when I gave it a twist back and forth. I was expecting perfection from the cleaning process but obviously didn;t get it. Is this normal? Did I miss something or should I set my sights a little lower?
When I do the big bike cleaning in the spring, I'll use the OMS in a jar method, and then blow off the chain with compressed air after I take it out of the jar. You'd be surprised how much more stuff comes off the chain. It will reduce the 'grittyness' of the cleaner, un-lubed chain.
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Old 01-08-19, 09:28 AM
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Now I have an excuse to buy a compressor! Until then, maybe if I can blow real hard
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Old 01-08-19, 09:48 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
Can I jump in with a quick question here? I just removed my chain and used OMS to clean it in a plastic bottle. Changed out the solvent 5-6 times until it remained fairly clear. I was surprised when I replaced the chain that I could still hear lots of grinding between the links when I gave it a twist back and forth. I was expecting perfection from the cleaning process but obviously didn;t get it. Is this normal? Did I miss something or should I set my sights a little lower?
Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
I'm still hoping to be able to reuse the mineral spirits after the contaminants settle out.
I manipulated the chain and felt/heard the grit before applying lube - but the lube is coming next, before my morning commute. Will a freshly cleaned chain always have this residual grit or should it be more like new?
What you are experiencing is one of the failings of oil based lubricants. It traps grit and moves it down into the chain. Solvent will remove the lubricant but it won't remove the trapped grit. Ultrasonic baths might dislodge some of the grit but it is just as likely to drive it deeper into the chain. I would expect any oil lubricated chain to have some grittiness left over after cleaning. That was what I observed back when I used oil lubrication.

Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
I just went back out to the shed to take a second look at the chain and give it the lube. I'm happy to report that the grit appears to be on the chainring and not in the chain. The sensation of the grit was transmitted through the chain from the (not-as-clean) chainring to where my fingers held the chain, halfway between the chainring in the front and the cogs in the back. So, I'm feeling better about my first cleaning now and looking forward to refining my technique.
The problem is that you have lubricated the grit so that it doesn't make a noise anymore. That doesn't mean that it went away. It's still there and will eventually be broken down into smaller pieces which will serve as a nice grinding paste. The small particle grinding paste will wear out the chain and, since you have oil to trap more grit, you'll have an endless supply of grit to replace any that get flushed out. The grit that the oil collects is the reason that chains don't last much longer than about 3000 miles.

Wax lubricants don't gather the grit so you don't have that "crunchy" feeling. However, wax doesn't lubricate metal-to-metal interfaces that well nor does it flow back to fill those gaps. You have more metal-to-metal contact and more wear so that the chain only lasts about 3000 miles. Both lubricants give about the same mileage for different reasons. The advantage of the wax based lubricant is that you don't have to clean the chain nor anything that touches the chain...like your leg, your car's interior, or your Samoyed.

Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
Eugew23, I haven never used an ultrasonic cleaner but it appears to be an appliance that holds a liquid bath in which small items are submerged. There must be some sort of energy wave passed through the liquid which "scrubs" the (in this case) chain. It sounds like they do a very good job of cleaning a chain.
An ultrasonic cleaner uses a transducer to generate a high frequency wave in the cleaning fluid. The wave should be in the 20 to 400 kHz range. The sound wave compresses the fluid and pulls it apart. In the wake of the wave front, the liquid cavitates or creates voids which collapse with a lot of pressure. This is supposed to dislodge materials from surfaces. It kind of works but most cheap ultrasonic cleaners provide more vibration than cavitation. That's probably because the frequency isn't high enough. I would suspect that for really cheap "ultrasonic cleaners", they don't even have a transducer.
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Old 01-08-19, 12:54 PM
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Some people will do almost anything to avoid riding.
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Old 01-08-19, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Some people will do almost anything to avoid riding.
That really did make me chuckle out loud.
I rode home today in the aftermath of a snow storm and still used a rag when I got in after washing my bike down, and it was darn mucky and slushy.
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Old 01-08-19, 11:16 PM
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Since switching to a wax based lube, I have never cleaned my chain. I coat my chain with the paste-like wax, take a heat gun to it and any grime drips off. Some may not like this, but 5,000 kms later, the chain runs great
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Old 01-09-19, 06:53 AM
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Monthly-remove rear wheel, install dummy hub, clean with blue plastic park tool chain cleaner with orange solvent, rinse, fill chain cleaner with dish soap solution and clean again, dry thoroughly with low pressure compressed air and lube with rock-n-roll gold chain lube. at this point I clean chainrings and jockey wheels and cassette.

clean weekly with rock-n-roll gold chain lube.

usually wipe down with rag between rides

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Old 01-09-19, 08:30 AM
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+6 for removing the chain. For those that do you really need to check into the stainless steel Connex chains which includes the Connex quick link. No need to replace the link after repeated use. The link is designed to be removed by hand (no tools) and does not wear. Stainless Connex chains also have the highest longevity.

https://bikerumor.com/2018/01/29/wip...lasts-longest/
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Old 01-09-19, 08:43 AM
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The real world and laboratory tests rarely see eye-to-eye, and the Wipperman chain test is no exception. I tried Connex. It didn't last appreciably longer or shift noticeably better than any other chain. Here in reality, a chain is a chain, pretty much.

But let's take the test at face value, and say that the best (Connex 11SX) and worst (SRAM PC1110) chains tested are what the test purports them to be-- that the 11SX will go 187 hours before elongation, and the 1110 just 53. This means the Connex will last 3.5X as long.

Too bad the Connex is ~$70, and the PC1110 is $15. That's 4.6X as expensive. And I get 3,000-3,500 miles out of every PC1110, just like I get 3,000-3,500 miles out of any other chain. To begin to be economically viable, a Connex would need to last upwards of 10,000 miles.

I did use a Connex link with another (non-Connex) chain for a while-- it's the only quick link I've had break on the bike.
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Old 01-09-19, 09:43 AM
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First choice is removing the chain and using a wide-mouth plastic bottle and shaking it in OMS. But if the chain must be left on due to time constraints or laziness, then the Park Chain Cleaner with Purple Power.
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Old 01-09-19, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post

Too bad the Connex is ~$70, and the PC1110 is $15.
Clean Schmean. For 15 bucks, you can just ride the bike 15 times and then just throw the chain in the trash. I can deal with a dollar a ride.
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Old 01-09-19, 11:04 PM
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You're not far off. I hot wax my chains, so they only get cleaned once, to remove the factory coating-- and with my current wax mix, a typical chain gets waxed around half a dozen times before it goes in the bin. Absolutely no need to try to stretch the life of the chain, much less clean it. A $15 chain and 75Ę worth of wax blend every 3,000 miles. Can't justify spending more on a chain than I typically do on a cassette.
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