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Well. Thatís something I havenít see before...

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Well. Thatís something I havenít see before...

Old 01-27-19, 09:27 PM
  #1  
billnuke1 
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Well. Thatís something I havenít see before...



Iíve got a lot of miles on this bike...havenít ridden it for a couple of years. Serviced not too long before parked. No wheel hop ever discerned while riding. Wheel is still true! Discovered on the stand. Went for test ride before getting ready to sell...hung the bike on the stand...I heard two snaps and discovered this...
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Old 01-27-19, 10:02 PM
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OK, I've heard of broken flanges and seen the photos, but how the hell did you getting matching damage on both flanges at the same time???
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Old 01-27-19, 10:14 PM
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Jeff Wills
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Lots of spokes plus cheap hub: flange go boom.

Long ago I made the mistake of lacing a 36-spoke OMAS hub radially. I was adding tension when it went CRACK! and something ricocheted off the ceiling and hit me in the head. I assume what hit me in the head was shrapnel- there was a big chunk of one flange missing.

I'm with Shimagnolo- how the heck did you get both flanges to let go at once?
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Old 01-27-19, 10:27 PM
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As spoke tensions have increased broken flanges have also become more common. We see a few each year these days. Andy
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Old 01-28-19, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
I'm with Shimagnolo- how the heck did you get both flanges to let go at once?
I suspect that one side went first and the now-unopposed force from the broken side was transferred to the other side which went shortly thereafter. OP reports hearing two separate snaps.
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Old 01-28-19, 08:33 AM
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I remember now as I play the ride back I my head, hearing a couple of clicks like the indexed shifter clicked like I had over shifted and the shifter had clicked/ratcheted back one click.
I coulda died!
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I know this bike and wasn’t worried pushing it like it is supposed to be ridden!
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Old 01-28-19, 08:38 AM
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31 years old! 1988 C’dale Black Lightning.
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Old 01-28-19, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
As spoke tensions have increased broken flanges have also become more common. We see a few each year these days. Andy
+1 this. There seems to be a common misconception that more tension is always better. Low spoke count wheels require higher tension than wheels with 28 or more spokes, but that doesn't mean you should use the same high tension on wheels that don't have low spoke counts. Low spoke count components are designed to handle the higher tension required; other components may not be.
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Old 01-28-19, 08:53 AM
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What brand is the hub? Looks fairly generic. Is that black paint?
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Old 01-28-19, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
What brand is the hub? Looks fairly generic. Is that black paint?
'88 Cannondale. Was probably a Suntour hub? IIRC, the Black Lightning had a custom Suntour group.

Are the broken parts silver or white? If they're white, it's probably a crack that's been there for a long time, and finally expanded until it let go.
Since it's both flanges, at the same place, my guess is that it was dropped on the shop floor before it was strung in to the wheel. 30 years of riding, and that little crack eventually became a big one.
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Old 01-28-19, 12:04 PM
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What did you hit?

Only if the original buyer posted this is there any assurance that some one did not put a different wheel in, over all that time..
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Old 01-28-19, 01:01 PM
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Looking at the state of the quick release, the fork tips, and the smutz on the hub, I suspect the problem is more chemical than physical. It looks to me like there is road salt on the hub. It's likely to be magnesium chloride as well. Mag chloride absorbs water out of the air and provides a chloride sink so that the aluminum is scavenged. It forms aluminum chloride, the chloride ion is exchanged from oxygen and the chloride goes back for another bit of the aluminum. If you live in an area with enough humidity, you might even get flow of the chloride to the bottom of the hub. Both sides then get plucked equally and the result is weakness in the same spot on both sides of the hub.

Rinse the hubs before you let the bike sit next time.
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Old 01-28-19, 07:20 PM
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Yup.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Looking at the state of the quick release, the fork tips, and the smutz on the hub, I suspect the problem is more chemical than physical. It looks to me like there is road salt on the hub. It's likely to be magnesium chloride as well. Mag chloride absorbs water out of the air and provides a chloride sink so that the aluminum is scavenged. It forms aluminum chloride, the chloride ion is exchanged from oxygen and the chloride goes back for another bit of the aluminum. If you live in an area with enough humidity, you might even get flow of the chloride to the bottom of the hub. Both sides then get plucked equally and the result is weakness in the same spot on both sides of the hub.

Rinse the hubs before you let the bike sit next time.
Yup. Cape Cod. Bought down Cape a bunch of years ago. Was beautiful when I used ride it more. Just got it down from the attic.
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