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Reinstalling Derailleur

Old 03-09-19, 03:45 PM
  #1  
fullergarrett
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Reinstalling Derailleur

Back in November, I was reinstalling the rear wheel on my 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle when the rear derailleur decided to fall off the frame.

Now, I'm determined to get it reinstalled properly. I went to my local Walmart and purchased a screwdriver to get it mounted back on.

But I'm currently having difficulties. In another thread, someone mentioned to mount the derailleur in the drop-out, which I've done. But my chain has got tangled up because of it (the derailleur) has been hanging off the bike since it fell off. Any suggestions on how to untangle it and get the derailleur back on properly?




Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Old 03-09-19, 03:59 PM
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Break the chain, untangle, reinstall, reconnect.
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Old 03-09-19, 04:11 PM
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Or , take the bottom pulley out Unscrew bolt, , swing the back cage open , chain loop then separates from the rear D..
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Old 03-09-19, 05:27 PM
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I agree with Koko on this one. I would find the master link in the chain if there is one and remove the chain first. Then mound the wheel and derailleur in the most obvious way, which is in the dropout and then reinstall the chain. There are some great videos on you-tube that you might want to check out before you damage something that doesn't need damaging. So glad to hear you bought a screwdriver and not a hammer. Good luck and enjoy the experience.
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Old 03-09-19, 05:30 PM
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Since you barely just bought a screwdriver, then now you may have to purchase a chain tool if there's no masterlink. Even if there was, then you'd need more tools which you may not have.
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Old 03-09-19, 05:42 PM
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I agree with @fietsbob, the easiest is to just remove that lower derailleur pulley, straighten up the chain, and then put it together.

I'm trying to imagine how the chain works without having the bike in front of me.

If you simply push the rear part of the chain forward, you'll have your loop back.

The chain probably got twisted in the rear derailleur when you had it loose. Did you ever remove the cable?
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Old 03-09-19, 05:50 PM
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You need to rotate the RDER about 45 degrees CW on the attachment screw so that the axle openings on the RDER & Drop Out align.

EDIT: Changed CCW to CW.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 03-09-19 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 03-09-19, 06:00 PM
  #8  
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I'm looking at that photo, and thinking you're gonna need to:

1) remove the rear derailleur claw, and the rear derailleur will still be attached to it, and chain running through it;
1a) rotate all of this (including the chain) clockwise, so you've got your chain correctly looped and not twisted up
2) reinstall it so that the rear derailleur claw is rotated clockwise (relative to where it is now) so that the open section/slot is aligned with the open section/slot of the frame - see here: Derailleur Hangers Demystified - Red Clover Components This is so the wheel axle can slide into that slot, where it will land in the frame and tighten down against the claw.

Otherwise, dismantle & separate everything - the rear derailleur claw, rear derailleur, and split the chain - and start from scratch. Use the above link to see how it's supposed to run, along with YouTube videos.

Let us know how you get on, and keep posting pics!
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Old 03-09-19, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by ridelikeaturtle View Post
I'm looking at that photo, and thinking you're gonna need to:

1) remove the rear derailleur claw, and the rear derailleur will still be attached to it, and chain running through it;
1a) rotate all of this (including the chain) clockwise, so you've got your chain correctly looped and not twisted up
2) reinstall it so that the rear derailleur claw is rotated clockwise (relative to where it is now) so that the open section/slot is aligned with the open section/slot of the frame - see here: Derailleur Hangers Demystified - Red Clover Components This is so the wheel axle can slide into that slot, where it will land in the frame and tighten down against the claw.

Otherwise, dismantle & separate everything - the rear derailleur claw, rear derailleur, and split the chain - and start from scratch. Use the above link to see how it's supposed to run, along with YouTube videos.

Let us know how you get on, and keep posting pics!
That is what I thought.

I guess the cable should slip in a circle as you rotate the derailleur (put it in the highest gear (least tension)).
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Old 03-09-19, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
That is what I thought.

I guess the cable should slip in a circle as you rotate the derailleur (put it in the highest gear (least tension)).
That's a very good point, it'd be best to disconnect the cable (from the rear derailleur) first, and reconnect it after everything's been rotated back into the correct position. Sure, he'll need to reset the adjustment, but this is the least priority of problems here
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Old 03-09-19, 07:23 PM
  #11  
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Thanks everyone for the replies. I'm probably going to try it again tomorrow.

As for tools, I don't have many. I have the screwdriver and an adjustable wrench, but that's about it.

I don't have a bike stand, so I have to work on the bike either sideways (like in the pic) or upside down. The bike's been/being stored upside down. The shifter is in a strange position on the bike, so that when the bike is placed on the ground upside down it is immediately knocked out of the highest gear.

BTW, I just noticed that in the pictures the claw for the derailleur is in the incorrect position. I have fixed it since, but the chain is still obviously twisted and tangled up.

This is probably one of those times I'd take the bike to the local bike shop, but the nearest bike shop is 30 miles away and the bike doesn't fit in my car. So...

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Old 03-10-19, 05:57 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
Thanks everyone for the replies. I'm probably going to try it again tomorrow.

As for tools, I don't have many. I have the screwdriver and an adjustable wrench, but that's about it.

I don't have a bike stand, so I have to work on the bike either sideways (like in the pic) or upside down. The bike's been/being stored upside down. The shifter is in a strange position on the bike, so that when the bike is placed on the ground upside down it is immediately knocked out of the highest gear.

BTW, I just noticed that in the pictures the claw for the derailleur is in the incorrect position. I have fixed it since, but the chain is still obviously twisted and tangled up.

This is probably one of those times I'd take the bike to the local bike shop, but the nearest bike shop is 30 miles away and the bike doesn't fit in my car. So...

Well done so far; you're not far off having this sorted.

I think you now only need to disconnect the cable from the rear derailleur, disconnect the rear derailleur, rotate it clockwise a full turn (to sort out the chain), and then reattach everything.
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Old 03-10-19, 09:30 AM
  #13  
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You need to take the derailleur off the bike again and twist it so the chain coming off the top of the chainring in the front is going to the top of the derailleur in the back with the pulley turned. Stand up the bike normally to do this so it is less confusing. Hang it from the saddle on something so it is upright. It'll be a lot more obvious., You have a single twist in it the way it is.
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Old 03-10-19, 03:07 PM
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Well, this project may be on the back burner. How hard is it to remove, reinstall and adjust the cable on the rear derailleur?

Today, one of the tubes just decided to explode... with no warning... inside my dorm room while I was checking it and to see if my electrical tape rim tape had held up. It was loud, but not deafening loud. Thankfully, nobody came to ask what it was. The area where the tube blew was super thin... kind of surprised how it even held air anyways.

Reason #9582492 I try to stay away from the el-cheapo Bell tubes you get at Walmart. They love to bulge and IMO have poor rubber quality.
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Old 03-10-19, 04:47 PM
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If the cable wasn't disconnected when this happened, it may not need to be disconnected to repair. As mentioned, I think if all tension is released, then the cable may well swivel at the derailleur cable stop, and one should be able to twist the derailleur without disassembling anything.

As far as Walmart tubes... I don't know. The bulges appear from inflating the tubes without a tie.

What is your tire size? It looks like a tube around say 700x35mm should work. I like using as large of tubes as will ordinarily fit in the tire.
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Old 03-10-19, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
If the cable wasn't disconnected when this happened, it may not need to be disconnected to repair. As mentioned, I think if all tension is released, then the cable may well swivel at the derailleur cable stop, and one should be able to twist the derailleur without disassembling anything.

As far as Walmart tubes... I don't know. The bulges appear from inflating the tubes without a tie.

What is your tire size? It looks like a tube around say 700x35mm should work. I like using as large of tubes as will ordinarily fit in the tire.
The cable has never been disconnected from the derailleur. I'm very limited with tools and technical know-how (I'm honestly not that mechanically inclined), so I'm trying to limit what I take apart.

While tubes can bulge when inflated outside of the tire (afterall, there's nothing to contain them,) I've found that a lot higher quality tubes can be inflated quite a bit without bulging. It's caused mostly by inconsistent thickness of the rubber, which is (at least IMHO) a sign of poor quality. That particular tube burst right at the bulge. Upon inspection, it's definitely much thinner than at any other part of the tube. (By the way, the tube in the image wasn't the one that burst. It's still inflated in the rear tire.) The bulges are just one of a couple reasons I tend to stay away from Bell/CST tubes. (Although lately Bell has transitioned their tube manufacturing from CST to Acimut, which leads me to believe that the tubes I purchased have likely been sitting on the shelf for a while. Besides, 27" road bike tires aren't that common anymore.)

As for the poor-man's rim strip (electrical tape, double-layered,) it looked fine. I was inspecting the tube to make sure it didn't have any marks or stress areas from a possible weak area in the tape when BOOM! I haven't had any issues with using electrical tape in the past, but thought I'd check just to make sure everything was covered.

The Pinnacle has the old, 27x1 1/4" tires. The tube used were rated for 27x1 1/8"-27x1 1/4", so the size isn't the problem. It's just poor quality tubes. I'll probably pay up the extra couple dollars and get some higher-quality tubes from online.

I'm just glad it wasn't super loud when it popped... it sounded more like a balloon than a tube or tire blowing. But it didn't have too much air in it when it burst, anyways. I'm also glad that it wasn't one of the Michelin Protek Max tubes in my other bike that went... not only are those tubes expensive, but they're filled with slime. I wouldn't have a huge problem if a slime tube went outside... but inside, I'd probably explode myself.

This particular bike is going to be used primarily as "indoor decor." I just want to be able to turn it right-side up. Both rims on this bike are shot (both are bent and extremely rusty) and it has some other problems (saddle is bad, and kickstand no longer works properly) which need to be fixed. I have so many other things that take priority over fixing this bike, especially when I just bought a new bike.
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Old 03-10-19, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
Ick

Are there more of those extra holes along the side of the rim, or are those opposite from the valve.

That is a single wall rim, and the electrical tape may be fine. Don't use it on double walled rims.

I might take a wire brush in a drill to clean off some of the rust before taping the rim and mounting the tire.

I'd limit the inflation of your tube outside of the tire to 2x or 3x the zero pressure size.
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Old 03-10-19, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Ick

Are there more of those extra holes along the side of the rim, or are those opposite from the valve.

That is a single wall rim, and the electrical tape may be fine. Don't use it on double walled rims.

I might take a wire brush in a drill to clean off some of the rust before taping the rim and mounting the tire.

I'd limit the inflation of your tube outside of the tire to 2x or 3x the zero pressure size.
The holes in the rim are spread throughout the rim. They seem to be machined in, so nothing to worry about. I've found similar holes on other rims of the same vintage and size.

The tube wasn't inflated any more than double what the size it was when completely deflated. In fact, most of the tube wasn't "inflated" except for the swollen bulgy bit that popped.
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Old 03-11-19, 07:49 AM
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You don't need to break the chain to get the loop out. You didn't have to break the chain to get the loop in there, did you?
You will actually need that , since the RD cage is flipped upside-down. (due to no chain tension, since you removed the wheel. You just need to get that loop to the run of chain between the bottom of the crank and the RD. Once you put the rear wheel back in, and see how the RD lines up, you'll see what I mean.

So, you mounted the tube, inflated it, then removed it and inflated it outside the tire to check for leaks? Sounds like a lot of extra work for a 'just to be sure'
I typically don't inflate un-mounted tubes unless they're already leaking. The tube itself isn't a structural part of the wheel/tire, it's just a seal. it's intended to be supported by the tire casing, to keep it from expanding, not the other way around.
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