Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Tube patch glue

Old 03-22-19, 10:18 AM
  #26  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 7,468

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1291 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Simply use Park glueless patches. I have had them last 2 or 3 years. Used correctly they last a long time.
rydabent is offline  
Old 03-22-19, 10:42 AM
  #27  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 8,449

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2557 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Ditto, self-sticking patches. I've carried Lezyne self-sticking patch kits for a couplafew years, no problems. At first I considered them temporary patches but with one exception the Lezyne patches have held securely for a year or more. The one that developed a bubble and leak, I'm gonna blame on my poor technique working hastily in the dark.

The Lezyne patch kids are about the size of half a credit card and the thickness of two credit cards. So small and lightweight there's no reason not to carry one. Even diehard roadies who won't use a saddlebag could tape a Lezyne patch kit under the saddle, or just stuff it in a jersey pocket. It takes up less space and weight than a full gel pack.

The patches are about as thick as a bit of electrical tape -- ultra thin. No problems fitting the narrowest, snuggest road rim, tire and tube setup. With some punctures I'll use a second Lezyne patch inside the tire itself where the puncture occurred, especially at night if I can't inspect the tire well enough to be sure there's no embedded glass or debris. And the patch kit includes a tire boot -- a sheet of tough, thin plastic with the instructions printed on the sheet. The thickest bit is the metal scuffer. I suppose a diehard minimalist could toss the metal scuffer and use the pavement to scuff a tube to prep for the patch. Might save 1/10 gram of weight.

I keep glue and patch kits at home for proper tube fixes later if needed. But the little metallized squeeze tubes of glue will harden within a year or two. So we either need to keep buying glue patch kits or a small glass bottle of adhesive to keep home in the shop.
canklecat is offline  
Old 03-22-19, 10:46 AM
  #28  
Wilfred Laurier
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 4,067
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 244 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Glueless patches are crap. I have tried a few times and have about a 25% success rate. They seem to work initially but most have failed over a fairly short time.

I was on a tour this past summer and got many flats, and used traditional glue-on patches to repair. Every time I got another flat I was worried that the patch may have been the cause, and that I might have to admit it to my touring buddies, but none of the patches failed.
Wilfred Laurier is offline  
Old 03-22-19, 12:38 PM
  #29  
zacster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Brooklyn NY
Posts: 5,973
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I do as Eric S. stated above. I replace the tube on the road with a spare and keep the punctured tube for repair later. I still carry the patch kit too just in case I have a really bad day. I bought a box of Rema patches last year that should last a while since I have 5 family members that all ride on occasion and there are always flats. I haven't bought cement in bulk though, but maybe I will this year. I'm amazed at how many patches I've gone through already too. It just is a constant.
zacster is offline  
Old 03-22-19, 01:03 PM
  #30  
Eric S. 
Senior Member
 
Eric S.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 764

Bikes: '04 LeMond Buenos Aires, '82 Bianchi Nuova Racing, De Rosa SLX, Bridgestone MB-1, Guerciotti TSX, Torpado Aelle, LeMond Tourmalet 853, Bridgestone Radac

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I bought this for $10 some time ago but I haven't even dipped into it yet. Tons of patches, boots and a good size tube of fluid for about US$10-12.
Eric S. is offline  
Old 03-22-19, 07:43 PM
  #31  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Eric S. View Post
I bought this for $10 some time ago but I haven't even dipped into it yet. Tons of patches, boots and a good size tube of fluid for about US$10-12.
looks interesting, but then I looked it up and many of the patches are gigantic!
djb is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 07:05 AM
  #32  
wschruba 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,570
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 465 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
read the instructions, one must allow the thin layer of glue to dry.. Sandpaper area before.
Use finger spread glue thinly and evenly, slightly wider than patch shape, takes but a minute or two to dry, then carefully but firmly roll on patch.
might be just my habit but I hold thumb tightly over patch for a minute or so and that's it.

it's pretty straightforward, patches hold for years.
I am surprised how many don't think to, but you can use the foil backing of the patch to spread the glue out.
wschruba is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 07:37 AM
  #33  
2_i 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,391

Bikes: Trek 730, Bike Friday NWT, Brompton M6R*2, Trek 830, Trek 720, Dahon HAT060, Dahon HT060,...

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 313 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
looks interesting, but then I looked it up and many of the patches are gigantic!
In Japan I picked up a roll-up rubber sheet with backing from which you are supposed to cut out a patch of the size that you need. The disadvantage is that the edges are not tapered.
2_i is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 11:33 AM
  #34  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
In Japan I picked up a roll-up rubber sheet with backing from which you are supposed to cut out a patch of the size that you need. The disadvantage is that the edges are not tapered.
Ive never used non tapered, but thinking about it, I feel the tapering is a help for the patch being nicely securely held on and not having a lip that could get caught or whatever on a tube kept as a spare. Moot point for me, as all patches have tapered edges.
djb is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 02:42 PM
  #35  
Eric S. 
Senior Member
 
Eric S.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 764

Bikes: '04 LeMond Buenos Aires, '82 Bianchi Nuova Racing, De Rosa SLX, Bridgestone MB-1, Guerciotti TSX, Torpado Aelle, LeMond Tourmalet 853, Bridgestone Radac

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
looks interesting, but then I looked it up and many of the patches are gigantic!
True, but even the basic circular Rema patches are too big for a road tube to get a good pressing of all edges so I trim those a bit.
Eric S. is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 05:22 PM
  #36  
Spaghetti Legs 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,102

Bikes: Numerous

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 748 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Glueless patches to get you home. I also wrap my spare tube and levers in a length of duct tape for use as backup patch. The duct tape is nice to have for other emergencies and will get you a couple of miles of riding on a small puncture. I have a jar of the Slime glue mentioned earlier and a box of patches in my workshop for permanent repairs. I rough up the spot a little, dab of glue, let sit for about 30 seconds, apply patch and then clamp it snugly in my bench vise for a few hours.
__________________
N = '96 Colnago C40, '04 Wilier Alpe D'Huez, '10 Colnago EPS, '85 Merckx Pro, '89 Merckx Century, '85 Moser, '86 Tommasini Professional, '04 Teschner Aero FX Pro, '05 Alan Carbon Cross, '86 De Rosa Professional, '82 Colnago Super, '95 Gios Compact Pro, '95 Carrera Zeus, '84 Basso Gap, ‘89 Cinelli Supercorsa
Spaghetti Legs is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 08:26 PM
  #37  
Eric S. 
Senior Member
 
Eric S.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 764

Bikes: '04 LeMond Buenos Aires, '82 Bianchi Nuova Racing, De Rosa SLX, Bridgestone MB-1, Guerciotti TSX, Torpado Aelle, LeMond Tourmalet 853, Bridgestone Radac

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
We've gotten away from vulcanizing fluid drying out a bit, but I'll add that I keep some Gorilla Tape on my Rema boxes. I tried a piece once as a glueless patch and it held air for a couple days. Its outer shell is almost plastic-like and could serve as a boot in the event of a sidewall slash.
Eric S. is offline  
Old 03-23-19, 10:29 PM
  #38  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Eric S. View Post
We've gotten away from vulcanizing fluid drying out a bit, but I'll add that I keep some Gorilla Tape on my Rema boxes. I tried a piece once as a glueless patch and it held air for a couple days. Its outer shell is almost plastic-like and could serve as a boot in the event of a sidewall slash.
re using gorilla tape as a boot--thats a good point. Have only recently used that tape and man it is tough, so it certainly would work well as a boot.
Never have had to use a boot before, but will touch wood.
djb is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 05:58 AM
  #39  
JoeTBM 
Droid on a mission
 
JoeTBM's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Palm Coast, FL
Posts: 190

Bikes: Diamondback Wildwood Classic

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
I am surprised how many don't think to, but you can use the foil backing of the patch to spread the glue out.
Never thought to do this as the back of the patch is now exposed until the glue dries giving a chance for contamination.
__________________
JoeTBM (The Bike Man)
I'm a black & white type of guy, the only gray in my life is the hair on my head.
JoeTBM is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 07:57 AM
  #40  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by JoeTBM View Post
Never thought to do this as the back of the patch is now exposed until the glue dries giving a chance for contamination.
I agree, I only take it off right as I put the patch on, plus I like the taste of the glue when I lick my finger afterwards.
No way I'm giving up that.
;-)
djb is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 08:03 AM
  #41  
JoeTBM 
Droid on a mission
 
JoeTBM's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Palm Coast, FL
Posts: 190

Bikes: Diamondback Wildwood Classic

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by djb View Post
i agree, i only take it off right as i put the patch on, plus i like the taste of the glue when i lick my finger afterwards.
No way i'm giving up that.
;-)
JoeTBM is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 09:28 AM
  #42  
AlanHK
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was touring in Thailand and getting lots of punctures on gravel roads. Ran out of glue and got some at a small store. The guy gave me a thumbs up and told me it was the best, and mimed huffing it....
Anyway, alternate uses make it easier to find in many places.
AlanHK is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 03:43 PM
  #43  
wschruba 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,570
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 465 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JoeTBM View Post
Never thought to do this as the back of the patch is now exposed until the glue dries giving a chance for contamination.
Leave the patch on, spread the glue with the back of the foil (that doesn't have the patch on it...), then peel it off when ready to apply.
wschruba is offline  
Old 03-24-19, 04:21 PM
  #44  
dscheidt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
you must be an expert. what tips can you share? what are common mistakes to avoid? I'm thinking using too much glue &/or not letting it dry before applying patch?
The most common mistakes I see, when I've watched people try and fail to repair a tube are not sufficiently abrading the area around the puncture and not letting the glue dry.

Despite common wisdom about removing "mold release" and such, the real purpose of roughing up is to provide a good mechanical bond for the glue joint. An RMA #2 surface (which is much too rought for a bike inner tube, but what a car tire should be buffed to) provides a three or four fold increase in glue joint area; what you can do on an inner tube is much smoother, so you won't get that much increase, but it's still important. the glued repair is vulcanizing, so there needs to be enough free sulphur in the repaired surface to join in the cross linking. The tube is already vulcanized so there isn't much; increasing the area involved in the patch increases the sulphur available.

Letting the glue dry is important. If the glue isn't dry, the patch will move, and the solvent will have hard time evaporating, so the repair will move and not adhere properly.

Sand enough, let the glue dry, firm press the patch into place, and you will have very good results.
dscheidt is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 08:31 AM
  #45  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,344

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2865 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
Sand enough, let the glue dry, firm press the patch into place, and you will have very good results.
glue on just 1 surface? or both? or does it depend on the patch?
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 03:57 PM
  #46  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
glue on just 1 surface? or both? or does it depend on the patch?
methinks you need to read the instructions, or go to that neat encyclopedia thingee, the internet.
I can't tell if you are kidding with these questions or not.
If not, good luck.
djb is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 04:05 PM
  #47  
Racing Dan
Senior Member
 
Racing Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,224
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 701 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
glue on just 1 surface? or both? or does it depend on the patch?
Normal patches you only glue the tube and waaaait for the solvent to evaporate (several minutes). Then apply the patch with a form press and it instantly "fuses" to the tube. Resist the temptation to "test" the patch by inflating the tube. The patch may separate. Just install as per normal and ride on. Remember to check the tyre for whatever punctured the tube in the first place.
Racing Dan is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 04:17 PM
  #48  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,344

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2865 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by djb View Post
methinks you need to read the instructions, or go to that neat encyclopedia thingee, the internet. I can't tell if you are kidding with these questions or not. If not, good luck.
yes, you are easily replaced by google but this is a discussion forum
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 04:30 PM
  #49  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 8,471
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
yes, you are easily replaced by google but this is a discussion forum
thats cool, I shouldnt be a jerk about it.
I just looked at how much you have participated in this discussion forum and figured you are a pretty serious cyclist, so thought you were just goofing.
and thats ok too, we come on here for fun and discussion.

what the other guys have said sums the process up pretty much.
djb is offline  
Old 03-25-19, 04:36 PM
  #50  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,344

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2865 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by djb View Post
thats cool, I shouldnt be a jerk about it.
I just looked at how much you have participated in this discussion forum and figured you are a pretty serious cyclist, so thought you were just goofing.
and thats ok too, we come on here for fun and discussion.
what the other guys have said sums the process up pretty much.
no worries. I'm just a forum addict. sometimes I play "devils advocate" to further explore a topic. maybe I shouldn't have posed the question to you, meaning I could have just introduced it. been a long time since I did a roadside patch. I have more than 1 tube patch kit in my trunk cuz I'm too lazy to inspect them & make hard decisions about what I have, it's condition & what's really necessary
rumrunn6 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.