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Old tubes for patches?

Old 04-01-19, 07:39 AM
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Old tubes for patches?

Is there a problem with using old tubes for patches?
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Old 04-01-19, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by jrickards
Is there a problem with using old tubes for patches?
Lumpy
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Old 04-01-19, 08:04 AM
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No, but the patches will need much the same prep as the tube that is being patched does. So about double the time to patch a hole as two preps are being done. Stuart makes a good point about lumpiness. If you're running either narrow tires or pretty light casing ones you might feel the lump. For wider tires with their lower pressures or medium/thick casing/tread cap tires I doubt you'll feel the patch lump. Andy
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Old 04-01-19, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart
No, but the patches will need much the same prep as the tube that is being patched does. So about double the time to patch a hole as two preps are being done. Stuart makes a good point about lumpiness. If you're running either narrow tires or pretty light casing ones you might feel the lump. For wider tires with their lower pressures or medium/thick casing/tread cap tires I doubt you'll feel the patch lump. Andy
Good point about the lumpy-ness but I'd only consider it on my touring/commuting bike with 35/37C tires that are fairly bulky already. I'm not sure what you mean by more time to prep, I'm thinking that pieces of tube would already be cut up into patch-size pieces so it would take just as long to reach for a "real" patch as it would a piece of tube.
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Old 04-01-19, 08:27 AM
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You have 2 surfaces you have to remove the old, oxidized rubber from. The tube and the patch.
REMA patches work so well, I don't know why one would want to make patches out of "bricks".
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Old 04-01-19, 08:30 AM
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My experience is proper patches work much better. I tried using using an old tube and it didn't adhere anywhere near as well as a normal patch. Maybe there is a technique Im not aware of, but patches work great for me and cheap enough to not bother recycling tubes as patches.

Last edited by Racing Dan; 04-01-19 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 04-01-19, 08:33 AM
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What is the point?
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Old 04-01-19, 08:42 AM
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i have issues patching skinny road tyres, using a general patch kit i have to cut them in half & doesn't always work
thought about using old tubes instead

Lucky enough to get a good deal on Gumtree though, 21 new tubes 700/20-25c for just $10
ran out of them completely

Last edited by le mans; 04-01-19 at 08:46 AM.
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Old 04-01-19, 09:13 AM
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a previous topic returns ... again ..
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Old 04-01-19, 09:38 AM
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I have experimented with this, with all the problems noted: very lumpy, hard to prep the surfaces adequately and NONE of the attempts successfully sealed
the leak. Had the same results FWIW with Park glueless patches not sealing leaks but they are not lumpy. A box of 100 small Rema patches is $17 or so
and lasts years along with an 8oz can of rubber cement in the tire repair dept of auto parts stores/Walmart etc for $7.

eg: https://www.amazon.com/Rema-F0-P-16mm-Round-Patches/dp/B001S36CNC/ref=sr_1_28_sspa?keywords=Rema+tube+patches&qid=1554133215&s=gateway&sr=8-28-spons&psc=1&smid=AFUNG49VH4BIB

One other thing: if you try the OP approach and the repair fails, as it will, you will be unable to fully remove all the gunk to try a Rema patch and
will have to toss the tube and time wasted.

Last edited by sch; 04-01-19 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 04-01-19, 09:48 AM
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Old sewups cut up for tire boots ( where gaffers tape will do )
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Old 04-01-19, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by le mans
i have issues patching skinny road tyres, using a general patch kit i have to cut them in half & doesn't always work
thought about using old tubes instead

Lucky enough to get a good deal on Gumtree though, 21 new tubes 700/20-25c for just $10
ran out of them completely
https://www.amazon.com/Rema-F0-P-16m...gateway&sr=8-2
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Old 04-01-19, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by le mans
i have issues patching skinny road tyres, using a general patch kit i have to cut them in half & doesn't always work
thought about using old tubes instead

Lucky enough to get a good deal on Gumtree though, 21 new tubes 700/20-25c for just $10
ran out of them completely
I have never had this problem in over 50 years of cycling......I can't imagine whay the problem is

get a rema kit.... they have small patches if needed

use something that is designed to work, to work well and has a history of working well rather than some kludge,
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Old 04-01-19, 01:47 PM
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I just try to use what i got, i had a large pack given to me, that has rectangular shaped ones too
the circular ones of 20mm that came with it are obviously too big for the application

I would slice the rectangular patches in half, if they didn't work i'd try again till they held air for bikes that i flipped

Thanks for the link, Dave, something i haven't bothered to research before
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Old 04-01-19, 01:49 PM
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One benefit of tube-patch is flexibility. On skinny tubes, I find it annoying that the patches are so rigid they don't conform to the tube and don't always stick properly all the way around.
(I have never tried tube patches)
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Old 04-01-19, 02:05 PM
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IME tube patches are a bit hit-and-miss.
Even if I prep both tube and patch to the best of my ability and apply vulcanizing compound to both, I still get a patch that can easily be replaced.
I’ve gotten some to stick well enough, but none that has really impressed.
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Old 04-01-19, 02:11 PM
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After sanding I always resort to wiping it acetone first [using a white cloth you'll see what was on there] and using those trimmed patches will work on skinny tubes, sticks like shyte Lol
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Old 04-01-19, 02:41 PM
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I think that there is an advantage in having a patch out of rubber that is less vulcanized than in the tube and the vulcanization process advancing with the patch already in place.
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Old 04-01-19, 02:58 PM
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Interesting concept.

Vulcanizing rubber to rubber.
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Old 04-01-19, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
Interesting concept.

Vulcanizing rubber to rubber.
Except it wouldn't work that way. Rema patches use a two chemical system with an accelerant and a reactant. They are kept separate until you want reaction to start. Using a tube as a patch would only result in a rubber cement bond which may be adequate but not as strong as the vulcanizing bond developed with the proper patch and vulcanizing fluid.
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Old 04-01-19, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
Except it wouldn't work that way. Rema patches use a two chemical system with an accelerant and a reactant. They are kept separate until you want reaction to start. Using a tube as a patch would only result in a rubber cement bond which may be adequate but not as strong as the vulcanizing bond developed with the proper patch and vulcanizing fluid.
Thanks.

What about hot vulcanizing?

It does look like REMA has a couple of different 2-part vulcanizing compounds, but it appears as if one mixes them together, then applies like a rubber epoxy.
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Old 04-01-19, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by dabac
IME tube patches are a bit hit-and-miss.
Even if I prep both tube and patch to the best of my ability and apply vulcanizing compound to both, I still get a patch that can easily be replaced.
I’ve gotten some to stick well enough, but none that has really impressed.
Why are you 'prepping" and applying glue to the patch?
I do neither and they pretty much "become one" with the tube.
OOPs- I see you said tube patch. Please ignore.

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Old 04-01-19, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
Thanks.

What about hot vulcanizing?

It does look like REMA has a couple of different 2-part vulcanizing compounds, but it appears as if one mixes them together, then applies like a rubber epoxy.
Seems like too much bother. Rema has a very good system with their patches. It’s easy to use, relatively simple and relatively cheap. Why mess it up trying to “save” money with something that is harder to use, complex and more expensive?
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Old 04-03-19, 10:46 AM
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I have used tube patches for most of my life and still do when patching tubes at home, keeping the prefabricated patches for emergencies on the road. In the absolute majority of cases it worked out very well. You just have to follow the proper procedure - sand/abrade both surfaces meticulously, apply the glue in as thin layer as possible (but make sure it covers the surface completely) to both surfaces, let the glue dry for at least 10 mins (I usually opt for 15), press together tightly and leave it that way for a few minutes.
I have succesfully patched also some quite big cuts (5-6mm) this way.
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