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-   -   Is there a brand I should be looking for? (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/1170779-there-brand-i-should-looking.html)

Helderberg 04-17-19 08:30 AM

Is there a brand I should be looking for?
 
Or better stated is there a brand I should be staying away from. I am looking at using a 11-36 rear cassette on my Shimano equipped bike. The obvious is to just go with the same brand as is on the bike, Sunrace cassette, or go with the brand of the front and rear DR, Shimino, or go with another brand like micro Shift etc. Is there a correct or in my case the wrong way to go here. I will be having my LBS do the work and if they are realistic about the cost of the materials I will have them provide the parts also. I will be happy to pay for a reasonable mark-up as I know what it is like to have to keep the roof over their heads. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Frank.

Lemond1985 04-17-19 08:37 AM

How many gears? I'm a complete shill for the Microshift 8 speed shifters, they're both well-made and well-designed. Compared to all the Shimano 8 speed brifters I have used, the hoods are more ergonomic, springs are more robust, button placement better, and my favorite feature is that the brake levers don't move around when you shift. Price is quite reasonable too, ~$65 on Ebay.

Helderberg 04-17-19 11:12 AM


Originally Posted by Lemond1985 (Post 20888497)
How many gears? I'm a complete shill for the Microshift 8 speed shifters, they're both well-made and well-designed. Compared to all the Shimano 8 speed brifters I have used, the hoods are more ergonomic, springs are more robust, button placement better, and my favorite feature is that the brake levers don't move around when you shift. Price is quite reasonable too, ~$65 on Ebay.

Not shifters but cassettes. I have a 9 speed I am looking to replace.
Frank.

shelbyfv 04-17-19 01:38 PM


Originally Posted by Helderberg (Post 20888484)
I will be having my LBS do the work and if they are realistic about the cost of the materials I will have them provide the parts also. I will be happy to pay for a reasonable mark-up

Mighty decent of you! You won't be able to tell a difference in cassettes so ask the bike shop to pick one. They may be able to get better pricing on one or the other.

Helderberg 04-17-19 01:47 PM


Originally Posted by shelbyfv (Post 20889013)
Mighty decent of you! You won't be able to tell a difference in cassettes so ask the bike shop to pick one. They may be able to get better pricing on one or the other.

I can't tell if you are being sarcastic or not but that said, I think you are trying to tell me that there is no difference with the quality of the cassettes at this price point?
Frank.

shelbyfv 04-17-19 02:00 PM

You will not be able to tell one brand of cassette from another, same price range or different price range. More expensive cassettes will normally weigh less but this is immaterial for your use. There may be differences in tooth number of the various cogs within the range (11-36?) but that will not matter to you either. Actually, there may not be many choices to worry about in 9 speed 11-36. Good luck!

Bill Kapaun 04-17-19 02:05 PM

Will your RDER handle a 36T cog?

Do you always need the 11 & 36T cogs?
You might consider buying a chain whip & cassette removal tool and doing your own swap.
That way you could have 2-3 different cassettes on hand and swap out at will for your specific riding conditions.
If you are only riding on flat terrain that day, use something like a 12-25 for closer spaced gears. Hilly? Use something with a bigger largest cog.
https://www.parktool.com/product/cha...-wrench-hcw-16
https://www.parktool.com/product/cas...ng-tool-fr-5-2

canklecat 04-17-19 03:26 PM

MicroShift and SunRace are good budget values. I've used cassettes and freewheels from both. I put a MicroShift 11-32 8-speed cassette on my old Univega. Works fine with my Shimano bar end shifters, index and friction modes. Cost a whopping $12 from Nashbar last autumn.

If my budget could handle it, sure, I'd go with Shimano's better range of cassettes. But Shimano freewheels are nothing special (although they're reasonably priced too).

Regarding the LBS question, that's going to vary from shop to shop. Some mechanics might be happy to install your parts for a reasonable labor fee, especially if it's an uncommon or discontinued component. My LBS has done odds and ends favors for me. I offer to tip but they won't accept, so I always buy some stuff from their shop and don't dicker over price. Other shops have more restrictive policies. Just depends on the shop and your relationship with 'em.

Helderberg 04-17-19 07:20 PM

Thank you all for the responses. I would do the swap myself but not sure if I am going to run into a problem with the chain length and RD. Have had the rear wheel off and looked over a few videos, been a plumbing contractor for over 40 years so tools and mechanicals don't scare me. I would really like to do the job myself so I might just give it a shot. As far as the terrain that I ride. I have about 12% of my usual 15 mile loop that is flat. I have more than a few areas on that ride that Strava tells me are in the 11% to 14% range so the 36t would get used often enough to justify it's inclusion on my bike. I do have a three chainring bike, also a Cannondale Quick but the Black bike has the fork and the frame geometry and the fit and I just freak'in love it so I want to make that the primary and my go to bike. Dumb I know but I just feel like a million bucks riding that 3.
Thanks again for all the input. I might just swap out the cassette myself and see jut how much trouble I can get myself into.
Frank.

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3091b44d3c.jpg

zacster 04-17-19 09:28 PM

There really is nothing to worry about in changing a cassette except needing the proper tools. In this case that means a chain whip and a Shimano cassette lockring tool. The only other tool would be a big wrench and, well, I always use a plumber's wrench. From the pic it looks like your derailleur can handle whatever range of cassette you put on it, and my guess is the chain length is OK too.

As for choices, I always go with the original manufacturers for parts. Replacement/3rd party parts can be OK, but I just stick with Shimano or Campy for most of them, although I bought KMC chains.

Instructions:
1. Take wheel off.
2. Put chain whip around cassette so that it holds clockwise
3. Put cassette tool in lockring
4. Put wrench on cassette tool.
5. Turn wrench counter-clockwise while holding chain whip to loosen lockring and unscrew
6. Pull off cassette
7. Put on cassette
8. Put cassette tool in lockring
9. Tighten
10. Put wheel back on
11. Ride

Easy-peasy.

Helderberg 04-18-19 05:39 AM


Originally Posted by zacster (Post 20889592)
There really is nothing to worry about in changing a cassette except needing the proper tools. In this case that means a chain whip and a Shimano cassette lockring tool. The only other tool would be a big wrench and, well, I always use a plumber's wrench. From the pic it looks like your derailleur can handle whatever range of cassette you put on it, and my guess is the chain length is OK too.

As for choices, I always go with the original manufacturers for parts. Replacement/3rd party parts can be OK, but I just stick with Shimano or Campy for most of them, although I bought KMC chains.

Instructions:
1. Take wheel off.
2. Put chain whip around cassette so that it holds clockwise
3. Put cassette tool in lockring
4. Put wrench on cassette tool.
5. Turn wrench counter-clockwise while holding chain whip to loosen lockring and unscrew
6. Pull off cassette
7. Put on cassette
8. Put cassette tool in lockring
9. Tighten
10. Put wheel back on
11. Ride

Easy-peasy.

Thank you for the post and the work plan. I will give it a try and check back in a week or two as I have no idea how long it will take to get the cassette and the tools.
Frank.

bakerjw 04-18-19 06:59 AM

IMHO, cassettes are pretty much cassettes unless you are looking for DuraAce level equipment. I just always go with Shimano for my bikes and SRam chains. Unless it is for my tandems and then I buy bulk 10 speed chain.

hokiefyd 04-18-19 09:05 AM

I have a Shimano HG400-9 12-36 cassette and I actually wouldn't buy it again. I don't know if it's the cassette itself or something else, but I've never been able to get it to shift smoothly on ANY bike. I've had it on multiple bikes, and with multiple derailleurs on each bike, in an attempt to make it right, but I wouldn't buy another one. Downshifts (moving to larger sprockets) are generally smooth, but upshifts (moving to smaller sprockets) are universally pretty clunky. A different cassette on the same bikes shifts beautifully, and I'm fairly skilled at derailleur adjustment and indexing. Because other cassettes shift nice, I don't think it's a derailleur alignment issue.

My daughter's inexpensive mountain bike has a Sunrace 11-34 cassette with a basic RD-M360 derailleur, and it shifts better than any bike I've ever owned. Upshifts and downshifts are all very smooth, with upshifts having the chain lap and mesh perfectly on the next smallest sprocket. Whether or not it's complete coincidence or luck, I'll try a Sunrace the next time I buy a cassette. They're actually not any cheaper than Shimano in 9-speed models...at least not that I've seen. They all seem to run between $20 and $25.

zacster 04-19-19 05:07 PM

I used an 11-34 HG62 Deore 10sp cassette on my bike upgrade a few years ago and it works flawlessly. Every shift is smooth and quiet. HG400 is Alivio, and I'm not sure if that's road or mtb, but it is a lower end product. For the price, unless you go DuraAce or Record, I always go for the better parts as they aren't all that much more expensive. I'm a big fan of Chorus (over Record) and Deore or XT (over XTR) because of price. As long as it isn't ridiculously overpriced buy the best you can afford.

hokiefyd 04-19-19 07:04 PM


Originally Posted by zacster (Post 20892228)
HG400 is Alivio, and I'm not sure if that's road or mtb, but it is a lower end product.

I was particularly disappointed with the HG400 because it should be an upgrade over the part that it originally replaced, an Altus level 11-34 HG200. The 200 shifts wonderfully. Ever since I bought the 400, and had complaints with its shift quality, I've swapped that 400 and 200 around on various bikes, and the 200 just seems to work better on everything. It makes no sense to me. The finish on the 400 is materially nicer (nickel), but that's the only part about it that I like over the 200. As far as functionality, I prefer the 200.


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