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Better truing stand than Park Tool TS-4 or TS-4.2

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Better truing stand than Park Tool TS-4 or TS-4.2

Old 04-22-19, 10:47 AM
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cycledogg
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Better truing stand than Park Tool TS-4 or TS-4.2

I'm looking for a good truing stand and would like to know if there are any as good as the Parks TS-4? Preferably one that is less expensive.
Cheers
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Old 04-22-19, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
Better truing stand than Park Tool TS-4 or TS-4.2
I'm looking for a good truing stand and would like to know if there are any as good as the Parks TS-4? Preferably one that is less expensive.
Cheers
Let's see..."better", "as good", and "less expensive." Finding that will require a lot of research so stand by.
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Old 04-22-19, 11:11 AM
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look for a used one .. remember after death, or 'raptured up'.. "you can't take it with you" ....
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Old 04-22-19, 11:13 AM
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TS 8 ?
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Old 04-22-19, 11:27 AM
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It depends. On what you'll be doing. If you're only working on your own stuff and are in no rush cheaper stands that take longer to set up a wheel and/or are more flexible when working the wheel will be good and lower cost. But if you are intending to use the stand a lot, on many different sized wheels or just like well made tools in general then you'll really like the Park. The more you trend to this second need the more you'll want to touch and feel before buying.

Having used many different stands over the years I come back to the Park shop grade offerings time again. And I have a Var Preciray
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Old 04-22-19, 12:45 PM
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Well built, durable, reliable, easy and practical to use - Unior 1689. Works perfectly fine for my bike shop and at least in Europe, it's significantly cheaper than the mentioned ParkTool ones.

https://www.amazon.com/Unior-Profess...y&sr=8-2-spell
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Old 04-22-19, 05:35 PM
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Before I had the money to buy a Park stand I used an old steel fork from a junked 10 speed. I mounted the fork onto a piece of plywood, drilled and tapped holes at the base of the fork blades and installed a couple of threaded wingnut rods with plastic end caps on the rim end of the rod. This worked fine for many years.

My truing stand was festooned with stickers and was quite eclectic!

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Old 04-22-19, 07:54 PM
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When I bought my Park TS2 it was pretty much the standard of the industry. It still serves my purposes well, except that I have had to buy adapters for fat bike and thru axle wheels. If you need the latest and greatest, the TS4 pretty much has it all and can handle outside the box wheels without adapters.
If I was replacing mine today, I would probably go for the TS4 or 4.2.
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Old 04-23-19, 05:37 AM
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It's certainly not "better", but I use this Parks clone, and find it works pretty well, after you get it set up - And a LOT cheaper:
https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Whee...gateway&sr=8-3

You'll also need a dish gauge - Here's a decent one for the price:
https://www.amazon.com/Venzo-Bicycle...s%2C958&sr=8-5
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Old 04-23-19, 09:03 AM
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I certainly wouldn’t fault anyone for opting to utilize the convenience of a dishing gauge; however, all truing stands are also dishing gauges- just flip the wheel.
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Old 04-23-19, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by frankenmike View Post
I certainly wouldnít fault anyone for opting to utilize the convenience of a dishing gauge; however, all truing stands are also dishing gauges- just flip the wheel.
This! I never quite understood a dishing gauge when you could just flip the wheel in the stand. But never having built a set of wheels I thought there's got to be something I'm missing. Plus I'm cheap so I'd skip the dishing gauge.

OP - Roger Musson's ebook has plans for building your own truing stand: Professional Guide to Wheel Building
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Old 04-23-19, 11:11 AM
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The local bike co-op has several Park truing stands. Every one of them is off by a significant margin. The dishing tool is almost essential there.
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Old 04-23-19, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by jonafd17 View Post
This! I never quite understood a dishing gauge when you could just flip the wheel in the stand. But never having built a set of wheels I thought there's got to be something I'm missing. Plus I'm cheap so I'd skip the dishing gauge.

OP - Roger Musson's ebook has plans for building your own truing stand: Professional Guide to Wheel Building
Dishing gauge saves a lot of time.
Plus not all the truing stands are 100% calibrated, so you'd either have to use a calibration tool to calibrate the truing stand, or a wheel that is 100% properly dished.
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Old 04-23-19, 06:12 PM
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Again, flipping the wheel in the stand yields all the information needed regarding dish, albeit slightly less conveniently than a dishing gauge.
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Old 04-24-19, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by frankenmike View Post
Again, flipping the wheel in the stand yields all the information needed regarding dish, albeit slightly less conveniently than a dishing gauge.
Yes, agree 100% Honestly, flipping the wheel is faster than using a dish gauge in my opinion. Getting a truing stand dialed in and straight is pretty simple as well. Park has a video showing the process:
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Old 04-24-19, 11:35 PM
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Re: Better truing stand than Park Tool TS-4 or TS-4.2

Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
I'm looking for a good truing stand and would like to know if there are any as good as the Parks TS-4? Preferably one that is less expensive.
Cheers
Better than the TS-4? As good as the TS-4? Cheaper than the TS-4?

That's three different questions. Which one did you intend to ask?
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Old 04-25-19, 12:12 AM
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What happened to the Park TS-2 and TS-2.2? There are quite a few used ones bumping around.

Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Having used many different stands over the years I come back to the Park shop grade offerings time again. And I have a Var Preciray
Andy
I like my Var stand, although the Park stand may do better with tires on wheels.
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Old 04-25-19, 07:49 AM
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https://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Delux.../dp/B000AO7GDK


I use this one. I only have to true a wheel set once a year at most, sometimes twice so this one is good enough. Not super high end by any means but gets the job done. If I were doing lots of wheels on a regular basis I would drop the money on a park tool version. But this works. It folds up nicely and hangs under my work bench.

I am glad I got this too. LBS was charging me $15 per wheel to true up so this paid for itself.
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Old 04-25-19, 10:58 AM
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If you have more money than sense this is the one. https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/a-...-truing-stand/
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Old 04-25-19, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by davidad View Post
If you have more money than sense this is the one. https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/a-...-truing-stand/
for 2K it should true the wheel for you and make a sandwich to eat while it does its thing! dang
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Old 04-25-19, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by mixteup View Post
It's certainly not "better", but I use this Parks clone, and find it works pretty well, after you get it set up - And a LOT cheaper:
https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Whee...gateway&sr=8-3

You'll
I have this one and itís excellent. Heavy and well built. Itíll last forever with not need to upgrade
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Old 04-29-19, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
look for a used one .. remember after death, or 'raptured up'.. "you can't take it with you" ....
I bought a very grungy Park TS 2.2 chrome model from a LBS for $100 and got the QBP price for a Park rebuild ki, about $22. The stand cleaned up well and the kit rebuilt it to like-new functioning. I calibrated it with a trued and properly dished wheel and centered the caliper assembly, however I won’t rely on this. I recently completed the Professional Repair and Shop Operation certification course at the United Bicycle Institute’s Portland campus. During the wheel building segment, the instructor demonstrated centering a previously calibrated TS 2.2 with the Park 1554-1 centering gauge. Then he inserted a variety of trued and dished wheels in the TS 2.2 to show that the calipers would not equally center depending on the design of the wheel. The only wheel where the centering held was a front wheel with round locknuts. Rear wheels and wheels with the common hexagonal locknuts were all off to some degree. In class, we used sections of spoke inserted in the caliper mechanism to offset the right or left caliper, i.e. get it out of the way, and we used only one side of the caliper pair during truing, choosing the right or left caliper as needed. Centering the wheel was done exclusively with dishing gauges, in this case with VAR 143 gauges, beautiful tools that are fast to use. Unfortunately, they are not in production and are quite expensive on the used market. Since returning home, I have been using a Park WAG-4 dishing gauge and have come to appreciate the fact that I can dish a wheel with the tire on and also dish a wheel with the WAG-4 while the wheel is in the TS 2.2 (or on a bike, for that matter).
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Old 04-29-19, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Paramount1973 View Post
I bought a very grungy Park TS 2.2 chrome model from a LBS for $100 and got the QBP price for a Park rebuild ki, about $22. The stand cleaned up well and the kit rebuilt it to like-new functioning. I calibrated it with a trued and properly dished wheel and centered the caliper assembly, however I wonít rely on this. I recently completed the Professional Repair and Shop Operation certification course at the United Bicycle Instituteís Portland campus. During the wheel building segment, the instructor demonstrated centering a previously calibrated TS 2.2 with the Park 1554-1 centering gauge. Then he inserted a variety of trued and dished wheels in the TS 2.2 to show that the calipers would not equally center depending on the design of the wheel. The only wheel where the centering held was a front wheel with round locknuts. Rear wheels and wheels with the common hexagonal locknuts were all off to some degree. In class, we used sections of spoke inserted in the caliper mechanism to offset the right or left caliper, i.e. get it out of the way, and we used only one side of the caliper pair during truing, choosing the right or left caliper as needed. Centering the wheel was done exclusively with dishing gauges, in this case with VAR 143 gauges, beautiful tools that are fast to use. Unfortunately, they are not in production and are quite expensive on the used market. Since returning home, I have been using a Park WAG-4 dishing gauge and have come to appreciate the fact that I can dish a wheel with the tire on and also dish a wheel with the WAG-4 while the wheel is in the TS 2.2 (or on a bike, for that matter).
Exactly the way I have always done it, right down to the same dishing tool. I've worked in a shop that had a Park dishing tool, and it's much more cumbersome to use compared to the fantastic Var tool.
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Old 04-30-19, 02:48 AM
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I like using "double sided" truing calipers (not for dishing, I prefer the dishing gauge for that). It's easier for me to see where the rim comes closer (or hear it scratch), then where it goes too far away. It's also faster than flipping the wheel.
Caliper position is easily adjustable on my truing stand, so it works fine this way.
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