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how to imobilize crank 4 pedal removal

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how to imobilize crank 4 pedal removal

Old 05-18-19, 10:38 AM
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how to imobilize crank 4 pedal removal

i always use a large adjustable wrench.

most my bikes have steel crank with square profile, so it is fine


but this aluminum road bike crank has () profile...so the adjustable wrench dig into the aluminum and scratches it.

how am i suppose ti hold the crank w/o scratching it?

thankie!


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Old 05-18-19, 10:38 AM
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fietsbob 
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Call a Friend ?..* Buy a proper pedal wrench.!. they're 1/8" thick..
Shop Go To tool : https://www.parktool.com/product/pro...category=Pedal

though perhaps this will do https://www.parktool.com/product/pro...category=Pedal


* End of the summer.. I box up bikes, in shop, for those who rode across the country, to ship them back ,
with really stuck pedals its a 4 handed job..
we have a 'cheater pipe' that fits over the round handle of the shop pedal wrench too..








...

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Old 05-18-19, 10:44 AM
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I just use some scrap lumber between the arm and chain stay
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Old 05-18-19, 11:06 AM
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Point the crank arm forward. Point the wrench toward the back of the bike. That usually solves the problem.
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Old 05-18-19, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
Point the crank arm forward. Point the wrench toward the back of the bike. That usually solves the problem.
most of time, the nut wont line up the way you describe.

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Old 05-18-19, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
most of time, the nut wontline up the way you describe.
That is why pedal wrenches have a couple different angles for the nut. But in any case, from the pic you posted, you will be able to turn the wrench to the back and give it a try.
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Old 05-18-19, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
That is why pedal wrenches have a couple different angles for the nut.
oh thats very clever.
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Old 05-18-19, 11:41 AM
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Pedals stuck on crank arms is a pretty common problem. Sometimes you just have to take the crank arm off the axle. Then, lay the crank arm flat on a workbench for support. And, I've actually had to disassemble & pull the pedal off to expose the pedal axle and use a pipe wrench to remove the pedal axle.
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Old 05-18-19, 02:04 PM
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The common first way to stabilize the cranks to allow for greater force when loosening pedals is to position the other crank arm at it's chainstay and wrap a toe clip strap 2 or 3 times around the stay and arm. This works very well. If this isn't enough then remove the arm from the BB and clamp in a bench vice. Andy
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Old 05-18-19, 04:05 PM
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I have a 15# dumbell that can be situated between the crank arm and the floor. Then with one of those thin Park Tool wrenches as shown in post #2 , a few light taps with a hammer and the pedal comes right off.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:14 PM
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There is a good reason people make the right tools for the job. Adjustable wrenches are great for certain things but are terrible for more precision jobs or jobs that require tighter tolerances. Nothing takes off pedals like a pedal wrench. Yes you can continue being extra cheap it always ends well and by well I mean stripped and damaged parts so not at all well.
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Old 05-19-19, 01:51 AM
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I just stand on it with one foot, or hold the other crank with my hand while the bike is upside down. If your pedals are seized, you might consider some anti-seize before reinstalling.

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Old 05-19-19, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
There is a good reason people make the right tools for the job. Adjustable wrenches are great for certain things but are terrible for more precision jobs or jobs that require tighter tolerances. Nothing takes off pedals like a pedal wrench. Yes you can continue being extra cheap it always ends well and by well I mean stripped and damaged parts so not at all well.
He's using the adjustable wrench to hold the crank arm, not remove the pedal (at least according to the picture). OP never says what he's using for the pedal.
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Old 05-19-19, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
He's using the adjustable wrench to hold the crank arm, not remove the pedal (at least according to the picture). OP never says what he's using for the pedal.
Well spotted, but even if he were, what's the issue with that? I use my bahco 8" wide jaw for pretty much any hex on my bike and I never bust any nut heads. It's all about technique imo, if you're a gorilla, you'll break anything, even park stuff.

Not attacking you btw, I just quoted your post to get in on the discussion.

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Old 05-19-19, 07:01 AM
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A little off topic but, if you put your chain onto the big chainring first, you'll injure yourself a lot less when that crescent wrench breaks loose.
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Old 05-19-19, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
Point the crank arm forward. Point the wrench toward the back of the bike. That usually solves the problem.
What makes this method truly elegant is that it works equally well for both sides!

Once in a while a tap with a mallet helps.
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Old 05-20-19, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
He's using the adjustable wrench to hold the crank arm, not remove the pedal (at least according to the picture). OP never says what he's using for the pedal.
Still a poor idea. Adjustable wrenches really don't have a lot of place on a bike when actual properly sized tools exist. If I absolutely needed to keep the crank arm from moving and didn't have a second person I would use an old toe strap or something similar to that.
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Old 05-20-19, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
Point the crank arm forward. Point the wrench toward the back of the bike. That usually solves the problem.
This is the way it's done. If your wrench won't line up right it's either because you haven't tried or you need a better pedal wrench. I've removed hundreds and hundreds of pedals and have never had to hold the crank with a wrench. That's crazy.

Is there a bike co-op local to your area? If so, I think you would find a lot of benefit.

Last edited by Moe Zhoost; 05-20-19 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 05-20-19, 03:42 PM
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An adjustable wrench in my day was called a knuckle buster. I only use one if I'm planning to injure myself.
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Old 05-20-19, 03:56 PM
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Maybe this got said already. Stand the bike on the floor, leaning against a table. (Something to keep the bike from moving forward can help.) Crank forward. Wrench back. One hand (or hammer, etc.) on the wrench, one of the pedal.

And once you get it off - when you put it or another pedal back on, use plenty of good grease on the threads and just snug up with the wrench. No great force is required. Pedals self tighten through the action of pedaling. For those pedals that have allen key sockets, a small allen key works just fine. That same torque with the big pedal wrench means almost no hand force. The only reason pedal wrenches are that long and hefty is so mechanics can remove pedals installed improperly; either by too much force or not enough quality grease or both.

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Old 05-20-19, 04:04 PM
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I guess I don't tighten my pedals as much as others. I usually can find a position where I can hold the pedal or crank with one hand while turning the wrench with the other. Rarely do I have to use something to cheat it with or lock against the chain with the wheel on the ground.

Not everything has to be tightened as tight as you can get it, nor even to the highest recommended torque when a range is given.
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Old 05-20-19, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
He's using the adjustable wrench to hold the crank arm, not remove the pedal (at least according to the picture). OP never says what he's using for the pedal.
If this is the case, stop. You only need one wrench, for the pedal, and no other tool.

Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
Point the crank arm forward. Point the wrench toward the back of the bike. That usually solves the problem.
This is indeed "how its done" and is really important, and really easy. If you line up the wrench and the crank arm in the proper way, when you press on the wrench the force is directly aligned with the center of the BB. You are putting no torque on the crank, and there's and no need to immobilize anything. If you have a long pedal wrench and push down on the end of it so that your force is not transmitted directly through the center of the bottom bracket, there is a limited amount of torque. Easily handled by pushing down on the pedal, too. But if you get things oriented right, you need much less force on the pedal. You can reverse the setup to take pedals off.

Worked for me for the several thousand pairs of pedals I've installed and removed.

Originally Posted by berner View Post
An adjustable wrench in my day was called a knuckle buster. I only use one if I'm planning to injure myself.
And this. Get a proper pedal wrench. Or at least use a good quality open-ended (fixed) wrench.

See here, too:


Last edited by WizardOfBoz; 05-20-19 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 05-21-19, 04:41 PM
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I use a block of wood, just a little shorter than the BB center to floor distance. Position the pedal you want to remove forward, put the block of wood under the crankarm and position the pedal wrench wrench or allen wrench towards the rear wheel and push down. Pedal comes loose without too much drama. Note that this works for both sides. To tighten, the crank and block are in the same position, but the wrench is positioned toward the front wheel.
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Old 05-21-19, 05:15 PM
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I often use a door frame on the opposite crank arm
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Old 05-21-19, 05:27 PM
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I point crank forward also but a stack of bricks or 2x4 blocks under the pedal on the other side also works.
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