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new chain

Old 05-20-19, 05:33 PM
  #1  
jicjoc
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new chain

Hey I got a new chain from Walmart. Sorry I'm no expert.
I'm trying to get it to clip together.
Any advice?
I have a bike chain tool but it doesn't seem too obvious to me how to get it to work with this clip. Thank you
J

Sorry I cant post a pic as I've less than 10 posts. Anyone know the Walmart chain clip? And how to manage it
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Old 05-20-19, 05:37 PM
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"clip" might mean the connecting or the master link? If so then know that these are not used with a chain tool. Andy
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Old 05-20-19, 06:42 PM
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The two common options are a master link, or a pin. With a master link you take the two sides of the link and insert them through the chain ends, and with their pins nestled each into the opposing master link side. Then you pull hard u til they click.

With a pin you assemble the chain ends together and with a chain tool press the pin through, just far enough.

Did you lose some tiny pieces when you opened it?
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Old 05-20-19, 07:32 PM
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1. What kind of bike?
2. Are you sure that you have the correct chain?
3. Do you know how long your chain needs to be?
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Old 05-20-19, 08:23 PM
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Lots of YouTube videos. Just scroll down the video selection until you find what looks like your particular link. https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...le+master+link
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Old 05-23-19, 01:03 AM
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If you got it at Walmart it may be a Taya chain. These use a tool-free Sigma quick link. Check the Taya site for instructions. It's easy to use. The side plate with the attached pins is spring steel. Just bend it as shown in the demo. I seem to recall a similar quick link decades ago, but don't remember the brand.

Some users report failures but I've been riding one for over a month, including standing to stomp the pedals up climbs and on sprints. I weigh 150 lbs. So far, so good.

Mostly I use KMC Missing Links. They're good but difficult to remove the first few times without a tool or makeshift tool. With repeated reuse they loosen up just enough to unhook by hand without tools, yet hold securely enough that so far I've never lost one even when the chain dropped off the chainring during a hasty shift.
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Old 05-23-19, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
If you got it at Walmart it may be a Taya chain. These use a tool-free Sigma quick link. Check the Taya site for instructions. It's easy to use. The side plate with the attached pins is spring steel. Just bend it as shown in the demo. I seem to recall a similar quick link decades ago, but don't remember the brand.

Some users report failures but I've been riding one for over a month, including standing to stomp the pedals up climbs and on sprints. I weigh 150 lbs. So far, so good.
The Taya Sigma links were the first quick links I used from about 20-25 years ago. They did occasionally fail when the sideplate with the pins would snap. I can only guess that since this piece had to be flexed to attach to the opposite plate that this would weaken it after several remove/replacements. Just a guess though and maybe they have improved the design since then. Due to the design the link would at least hold together for a bit without a catastrophic fail when the sideplate broke due to the other plate holding the link in place. Having said all that I've never had a KMC link fail in around 80k miles of use and many-many removals and replacements.
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Old 05-23-19, 10:05 AM
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The Bell 6 speed chain my wife bought at Walmart is similar to the Taya link that Canklecat posted. I had to flex the chain sideways to get it to hook up.

This was going on a cheap bike that will be used only a few times a year, but at $3 on sale I figured why not try it.

I much prefer the KMC chains I usually buy.
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Old 05-24-19, 10:53 AM
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Master links have three pieces, quick links have two, and a chain tool is used primarily for breaking chains. Search videos for how to use master links, and watch the one that looks similar to your situation. That is what worked for me. I had an assembly manual for a bike that used a master link, but the parts included a quick link. I went to the corner bike shop and bought a master link. Worked with the assembly manual, and the video was an excellent supplement. The quick link, I didn't know what it was, but kept it. 3,000 miles later, I installed a new crankset with a 60t chainring. The one I replaced was 42t, so the chain needed to be longer. and the freewheel hub position adjusted. I had 2 new KCM 112 link chains, the primary chain needed to be 117 links per the freewheel hub position, and the secondary chain needed to be 21 links. That sounds odd because chains need to be an even number. Connecting the master and quick links will change links from 117 to 118 and 21 to 22.

However, the two chains each came with a master link, but I used both on the primary chain - one to connect the extra links, and the other to connect both ends. I used the quick link to connect the secondary chain, and just to make sure I did it right, I googled YouTube videos on quick links and watched the one that I understood.

Chain tool is helpful breaking old chains with grime on the master/quick link, and building custom chains. For me, connecting chains with the tool produced stiff links... using master/quick links worked best for me. Lastly, in my research for the project, I discovered recommendations to replace your chain every 1,500 miles. I doubled that, but the new chains rode smoother, so I'll replace my chains about every 1,000 miles in the future. There may be a time limit, like every year or 1,500 miles - whatever comes first. I rode 3,000 miles in 9 months, so for now I'll concentrate on the miles. And 1,000 opposed to 1,500 because I ride hard causing ware faster.
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