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Anti-seize vs Grease?

Old 05-23-19, 07:05 AM
  #1  
maartendc
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Anti-seize vs Grease?

Hi all,

I have just replaced my square taper Bottom bracket from cup and cone style to a Shimano UN55 sealed cartridge type.

Now I was following this RJthebikeguy tutorial:

He puts anti-seize on the threads. I did not have anti-seize, so I used this Polyurea Grease from Park tool (https://www.parktool.com/product/pol...26%20Compounds) that I have been using on all my threads (pedal threads, bottom bracket treads, etc.): Have I been doing this wrong? I see Park Tool also make an anti-seize, so they are clearly not the same thing. Will my threads get seized up if I use a Grease instead of an anti-seize?

Thank you!

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Old 05-23-19, 07:12 AM
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In a bicycle application, they're basically interchangeable. Anti-seize is "high solids," while grease has no solids. So in many applications (particularly those in heat) anti-seize will last much longer. But on a bike, doesn't really matter*. I routinely use both.


*maybe if a bike is left out in the weather to sit for years, using one over the other may have a lasting impact. For the typical user, I seriously doubt it.
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Old 05-23-19, 07:18 AM
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I agree. Anti-seize has colloidal copper or lead and is especually effective when fastening dissimilar metals. I use it on all threaded surfaces (works great on wheel lug bolts). In bicycle applications, it is such light duty, any sort of grease will work.
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Old 05-23-19, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by frogbiscuit View Post
I agree. Anti-seize has colloidal copper or lead and is especually effective when fastening dissimilar metals. I use it on all threaded surfaces (works great on wheel lug bolts). In bicycle applications, it is such light duty, any sort of grease will work.
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
In a bicycle application, they're basically interchangeable. Anti-seize is "high solids," while grease has no solids. So in many applications (particularly those in heat) anti-seize will last much longer. But on a bike, doesn't really matter*. I routinely use both.


*maybe if a bike is left out in the weather to sit for years, using one over the other may have a lasting impact. For the typical user, I seriously doubt it.
Okay, that is the answer I was hoping for! Thanks guys!
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Old 05-23-19, 07:46 AM
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I too use both and see little difference. But I appreciate a good lube debate so I'm hoping it fires up!
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Old 05-23-19, 09:09 AM
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My experience is that anti-seize (as the name says ) provides longer ant seize protection.

If re-applied at least annually, then grease is not too bad either.
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Old 05-23-19, 09:42 AM
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Re; Anti-seize vs Grease?

It's Grease , Plus..
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Old 05-23-19, 09:51 AM
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My choice is anti seize for the bb. Heavy grease will work fine too.
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Old 05-23-19, 03:22 PM
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All true, but has anyone had to deal with an anti-seized part that seized? I don't need to ask if anyone has had to deal with a greased part that seize (stem, seat post, etc.).
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Old 05-23-19, 05:05 PM
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It's a good question.. some scenarios to consider?
Ti pedals into a (what material are these?) crank's thread?
Alloy Seatpost into a Ti frame?
Ti bolts to secure an alloy stem's faceplate

Isn't the point of anti-seize to avoid galvanic corrosion, not duration or extending time between applications?
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Old 05-23-19, 06:01 PM
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Yeah, sometimes I worry about some dissimilar metals cohabitating nicely. My Trek 5900 has the original Ibis titanium threadless stem. I haven't disassembled anything to check it. For fancy stuff I'd probably pony up for anti-seize grease.

On my bikes with aluminum quill stems in steel headsets I just use Phil's green grease, which is probably marine grease. So far, so good.
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Old 05-23-19, 06:06 PM
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I have both. White lithium grease works fine for the purpose.

I don't like the automotive anti-seize that I have because it gets all over things (my fingers, the bike) and is much harder to remove than grease because it has very finely ground solids.
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Old 05-23-19, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaw View Post
I don't like the automotive anti-seize that I have because it gets all over things (my fingers, the bike) and is much harder to remove than grease because it has very finely ground solids.
Ha, I was going to post the same thing. Anti-seize is great but it is compound that has the innate ability to migrate to everything on the bike, in the shop or on you even though you didn't touch anything else beside the part that gets the anti-seize and the tool driving it
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Old 05-23-19, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by August West View Post
Ha, I was going to post the same thing. Anti-seize is great but it is compound that has the innate ability to migrate to everything on the bike, in the shop or on you even though you didn't touch anything else beside the part that gets the anti-seize and the tool driving it
Same here.
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Old 05-23-19, 07:32 PM
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I always envisioned anti-seize for things that are disassembled much less frequently, like cartridge BB 's or bolts used to mount racks. I find the M5 bolts that are used in dropouts for rack mounting, etc., are a tad more likely to get rusty. Seat posts seem to be a bit more out of the elements, so traditionally, I greased them. Upon reflection, though, I might change that over to Anti- seize for seatposts, as well. The rest of the more routinely dismantled threads get grease ( anti -seize is so much messier!). BeforeI learned about anti-seize (mostly from DIY auto repair) I used grease to no ill effect. I would use white lithium grease in places like lower headset bearings or the BB where water might get in. With the waterproof "marine bearing " greases, I no longer fuss with lithium grease at all.
In the automotive world, there were once sticky "assembly" greases that were intended to be displaced by or augmented with thinner hi- temp greases or lubrications. The marine grease has a similar viscosity as the assembly grasses of old. I like synthetic grease, like Super Lube, for my Sturmey Archer IGH's, as it doesn't thin out or wash out from the oil inside the hub.
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Old 05-23-19, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by easyupbug View Post
All true, but has anyone had to deal with an anti-seized part that seized? I don't need to ask if anyone has had to deal with a greased part that seize (stem, seat post, etc.).
Yeah, Im inclined to say grease is fine, then again parts may seize efter a long time. Form my experience pedals and seat posts are prone to seizing.
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Old 05-23-19, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
It's a good question.. some scenarios to consider?
Ti pedals into a (what material are these?) crank's thread?
Alloy Seatpost into a Ti frame?
Ti bolts to secure an alloy stem's faceplate

Isn't the point of anti-seize to avoid galvanic corrosion, not duration or extending time between applications?
Good questions, I can only say I come from a smoke stack industry where Preventative Maintenance was highly valued and for Ti if I recall correctly we always used a nickel based anti-seize with any dissimilar metals as apposed to cycling where I, owning only aluminum/steel and/or aluminum/aluminum interface, use copper.
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Old 05-24-19, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by August West View Post
a compound that has the innate ability to migrate to everything on the bike, in the shop or on you even though you didn't touch anything else
sounds like porcupine quills. I was once stuck w a couple quills taking pics of a dead one, even tho I never touched it!
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Old 05-24-19, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
I too use both and see little difference. But I appreciate a good lube debate so I'm hoping it fires up!
lots of ppl talking it down on the Jeep Cherokee forum for lug bolts. after breaking a cpl on an old 4Runner I began using it, sparingly of course, when ever I rotated wheels, etc. on all our cars. but now everyone is saying it creates a false torque easiness, meaning we're likely to over torque due to the lubrication & ppl are saying it's best to use nothing, on wheel lug bolts. I don't do that anymore so I can't dictate what other mechanics policies are. but I always like a small smidgen wiped w a cloth. especially around there the steel wheel sat on the rust steel wheel hub, on Wifey's old Tiyota
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Old 05-24-19, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
I too use both and see little difference. But I appreciate a good lube debate so I'm hoping it fires up!
...sweet memories.
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Old 05-26-19, 05:54 AM
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
I too use both and see little difference. But I appreciate a good lube debate so I'm hoping it fires up!
I use extra virgin olive oil on all my Italian bikes and sesame on Asian bikes.
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Old 05-27-19, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr.Lou View Post
I use extra virgin olive oil on all my Italian bikes and sesame on Asian bikes.
Don't make the mistake of using toasted sesame oil... the heating causes the oil to gum up and is heck to clean. In fact perilla oil, being a finer sized molecule is much more suitable for racing wheels, reducing bearing friction by .008 percent.
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Old 05-27-19, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Last ride 76 View Post
Don't make the mistake of using toasted sesame oil... the heating causes the oil to gum up and is heck to clean. In fact perilla oil, being a finer sized molecule is much more suitable for racing wheels, reducing bearing friction by .008 percent.
I concur, as long as temps donít drop below 0C
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