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-   -   What happened to the wear lines on Kool Stop brake pads? (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/1175678-what-happened-wear-lines-kool-stop-brake-pads.html)

spinnaker 06-14-19 02:10 PM

What happened to the wear lines on Kool Stop brake pads?
 
I have a set of kool stop pads for my touring bike and for the road bike. I am not seeing the wear warning line. When did kool stop eliminate those? So what is a good rule for replacement now?

fietsbob 06-14-19 02:20 PM

specifics? which pad?
 
Ask them yourself ... Kool Stop International - High Performance Bicycle Brake Pads Since 1977

pdlamb 06-14-19 03:14 PM

At a guess -- you wore it off?

spinnaker 06-14-19 04:49 PM


Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 20979074)

Gee thanks

spinnaker 06-14-19 04:50 PM


Originally Posted by pdlamb (Post 20979127)
At a guess -- you wore it off?

Nope brand new pads in stock.

fietsbob 06-15-19 08:55 AM

Again which one? they have many pads.. continental eagle claw dura 1 or 2
the pads they mold for magura or the ones they make and dont ship in bulk to germany?

I contacted company got longer bolts for my cross pads to use a thicker cupped washers..






....

Litespeedlouie 06-15-19 09:30 AM

I run mostly Dura 2 salmon pads and tend to replace them when the individual blocks wear down into one big one. I'm assuming the separate block design is there for a reason, such as water diversion.

djb 06-17-19 07:14 AM


Originally Posted by Litespeedlouie (Post 20980136)
I run mostly Dura 2 salmon pads and tend to replace them when the individual blocks wear down into one big one. I'm assuming the separate block design is there for a reason, such as water diversion.

I always figured the same thing re water diversion.
when mine wear to the main body of pad, I go a bit more and then change them when I get around to it, or leave them on a bike that I dont brake much on and will "do it one day" when it really ends up really thin. (bike I ride in snow and on the flat, ie low speeds and barely any braking other than for stop lights, but from low speeds)

Litespeedlouie 06-17-19 08:09 AM

I have a feeling separate blocks on a pad might have better grip than one big pad, perhaps due to extra biting edges or something. But one big pad should work. I don't think I've ever looked for wear indicators on any pad. I would just change as discussed, and before wear would allow metal parts to contact.

djb 06-17-19 08:45 AM


Originally Posted by Litespeedlouie (Post 20982627)
I have a feeling separate blocks on a pad might have better grip than one big pad, perhaps due to extra biting edges or something. But one big pad should work. I don't think I've ever looked for wear indicators on any pad. I would just change as discussed, and before wear would allow metal parts to contact.

think of how our car brake pads, or bike disc pads, are just one large surface area--the more pad to disc contact generally means more stopping action, so Im sure its for water/gunk diversion.
If what you think is true, our automotive disc pads would have separate blocks.

Litespeedlouie 06-17-19 02:05 PM

Some auto brake pads do have 2 or more sections, like these Bosch:
https://www.boschautoparts.com/en/au...isc-brake-pads

But I don't know why exactly - water/debris/brake dust diversion? vibration/noise control? better conformity/grabbing of the disc? marketing BS?

djb 06-17-19 10:20 PM

I have to plead innocence on car brake pad details past a limited amount.

TimothyH 06-18-19 06:15 AM


Originally Posted by Litespeedlouie (Post 20983299)
Some auto brake pads do have 2 or more sections, like these Bosch:
https://www.boschautoparts.com/en/au...isc-brake-pads

But I don't know why exactly - water/debris/brake dust diversion? vibration/noise control? better conformity/grabbing of the disc? marketing BS?

Automotive pads sometimes have grooves to prevent brake fade caused by outgassing...


The dominant mechanism causing brake fade is this thermal degradation of the phenolic resins and other materials in the friction lining, which create a film of gas at the pad-rotor interface and effectively causes the brake pad to skid off the disc. As these gasses build up at the pad-rotor interface, they produce an appreciable backpressure which creates an opposing force to the brake caliper that is trying to hold the pads against the rotor. If there is no way for the gasses to escape, the opposing force as a result of the outgassing can become large enough to prize the pads away from the rotor, reducing the area of pad in contact with the rotor and thus reducing braking power (i.e. brake fade).

Read More

-Tim-


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