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Shifting tension too tight on trigger shifts

Old 09-22-19, 09:05 AM
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gobicycling
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Shifting tension too tight on trigger shifts

Question? My wife is 82 years old . The spring tension on the left trigger shift on my wife's bicycle is too high when shifting from 1 to 2 or 2 to 3. Her thumb has extreme pain in it from the shifting. The bike shop has cleaned and oiled the almost new cable and made any other adjustments they can. It's simply that the spring is too strong in the derailleur. Any suggestions? This is a low end Shimano trigger shift for a triple front chainring. Or could we get a whole different front chainring derailleur and trigger shifter. Right now, she is keeping it in first position on the left Shifter but that doesn't work at all going down Hills even with the right in 7 position. Can a trigger shift be replaced by a grip shift, she has used these in the past?

Secondly, can an electric assist be added to a bike with a very very low entry, or are there electric-assist bikes with very very low entry? Thanks so much.
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Old 09-22-19, 09:27 AM
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Shifter ease- I've found that riders with tiny hands, weak hands or arthritic ones can find better function with a Grip Shift control. I've even installed a friction "thumb" shift lever for a few customers to work around this. I suppose one could weaken the der return spring but then the down shift onto a smaller ring would be compromised.

As to adding E assist to an existing bike- Sure one could. But the vast majority of home brewed/installed systems I have worked on generally are poorly designed and suffer from installation and quality problems. The rest of the bike isn't made for the added power and the cheaper the bike's grade the greater the less successful the long term results tend to be. There's no black or white just which shade of grey you end up with. Andy
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Old 09-22-19, 10:15 AM
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Check out where the shift cable attaches to the front derailleur. Do you see a little finger in the cable path? If so, the shift cable should go OVER that finger rather than under it. That changes the angle that the cable pulls on the derailleur arm and makes it MUCH easier to shift.
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Old 09-22-19, 02:45 PM
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Some of the eBike conversion stuff is OK, but none of it in my experience has as good of a general ride experience as the dedicated bikes. It's really very expensive and has mediocre range, but the Copenhagen wheel does feel pretty good and is very easy to install. There are a ton of low step eBikes. The Giant LaFree is a pretty good value (disclaimer: I work at a Giant retailer), some other possible options would be something like the Trek Verve lowstep, etc. Most brands have something similar.

As for the shifting, I double the suggestion for a grip shifter. It just plain uses larger muscle groups to operate.

Going forward, on a higher end bike, she may be happier with a bike with a 1x drivetrain and a wide range cassette. Shifting is easier.
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Old 09-22-19, 04:03 PM
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Thanks Andrew retro and cpach. I appreciate the great suggestions from all of you. Retro, we go way back but you may not know that.
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