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Beginner DIY rebuild or buy new?

Old 09-22-19, 04:42 PM
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wxep
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Beginner DIY rebuild or buy new?

Hello

I'm here looking for some advice. I've been browsing the web all day reading and watching videos to learn about bike builds. I have done very little bike repair before and am unsure whether I should take on this project or just buy new.

I have this old, beat up Peugeot Carbolite 103 frame bike that I haven't ridden in years. It was left outdoors in NYC for about a year at one point and got pretty beat up.

What I want is something I can ride to the gym in the mornings (about one mile), plus ride around the city casually on weekends. I want it to look good, though not something people would want to steal, and to function well. At first I thought I should just do the minimum and put new inner tubes and get it working. Then I noticed the wheels are a little bent so I should get new wheels. Then I remembered the brakes are kind of crappy and noticed how rusty the cables are so maybe I should get new brakes. Then I thought it would be cool to get a new powder coat... etc. etc.

I would be willing to spend up to $750 on this project. My question is, with that budget and with little experience with bicycle repair, am I going to get more bang for my buck buying new or rebuilding? Keep in mind I don't have any tools either.

If I do a rebuild I think I'd want to take disassemble completely to clean and adjust everything. I would want to install new brakes, chain, gearset, and wheels, and possibly send the frame for a new powder coat. I would want good quality components. How much time and money should I expect to spend?

Thanks for any advice. I had planned to post some pics of the bike but the forum won't let me post photos or URLs until I have at least 10 posts.
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Old 09-22-19, 04:53 PM
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You can buy a nice bike for $750, especially if you go used.

When you say the wheels are bent, are the rims damaged or are they just out of true? If they're out of true a little time with a spoke wrench might fix them right up. If you just want a beater that you don't have to worry about you could clean and lube everything, throw on some tires, maybe cables and brake pads and be done.
At least that would get you started.
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Old 09-22-19, 04:55 PM
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I recommend starting with a new bike and your $750 budget will purchase a quite decent new one.

I don't know how old that Peugeot is but it may have French threads which will make it difficult to find replacement components for and it sounds like the frame's condition is suspect. Also having little experience and no bike specific tools I expect you would be in over your head pretty quickly from both a cost and complexity standpoint.
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Old 09-22-19, 05:29 PM
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If there's a bike co-op in your area, they can help with shop time, advice and help, and used parts. An experienced eye can tell much more than a forum post ever can.
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Old 09-22-19, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I recommend starting with a new bike and your $750 budget will purchase a quite decent new one.

I don't know how old that Peugeot is but it may have French threads which will make it difficult to find replacement components for and it sounds like the frame's condition is suspect. Also having little experience and no bike specific tools I expect you would be in over your head pretty quickly from both a cost and complexity standpoint.
+1
I've been down that road--- Inexperienced and a 1st bike with some obsolete/NLA parts.
It can be done, but much better by one with experience and a knowledge of what they are getting themselves into.

You can find VERY GOOD starter bikes on craigslist etc. for under $200.
You have to be a bit fussy and know what to look for.
Sometimes you stumble on fantastic deals for $50.

If you start with a decently functioning bike, you can ease yourself into "fixing bikes" by doing the simple maintenance tasks to start. Just servicing the wheel bearings will probably be twice as educational as you expect.
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Old 09-22-19, 05:59 PM
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A new bike that fits your budget and yourself.
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Old 09-22-19, 06:19 PM
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Instead of trying tp produce a complete painting try a postage stamp first. I suggest fixing up the stuff that doesn't cost much first. You will quickly find that you either like doing this stuff or not. If you do then step up the intensiveness of your servicing. After a few go rounds you will develop an opinion as to what you can do, what it will cost and how much a bike means to you. Andy
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Old 09-23-19, 07:54 AM
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Andrew has a good point. I'd say that if your goal is to learn bicycle mechanics, and you have time and patience, you could choose to fix up the old 103. I used to set those up in the bike shop (way) back in the day. Some advantages over Schwinn's electroforged frames, and a decent ride. So if the goal is the journey and not the destination, you could fix it up, incrementally.

That said, the 103 is a pretty plain, nothin' special frame. If you had, say, a PX-10 of Reynolds 531 butted tubing, I'd be more excited. The point is, even after you fix up a 103, you'll have a serviceable, though unexceptional bike. So you probably have a $50 bike now. If you put several hundred dollars into it, you'd probably have a $150 bike.

If the goal is the destination, you can find a lot better bike (especially used, and especially a used version that wasn't rode hard and put away wet, as they say) for $750. Or, try to find a rideable 103 for 100 bucks or so.
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Old 09-23-19, 08:53 AM
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FWIW rebuilding an old bike requires more knowledge and skills than even building a new one. More "gotcha's", more research on what's going to be compatible, and not knowing whether there's some particular quirk that only bike mechanics would know about. Even deciding whether some part is worn enough to replace, or is worth upgrading, can become a project.

I'll defer to the actual mechanics about your bike and what it will need, but just wanted to get it up front that as a relative beginner you'll be undertaking a project that is more complicated than the other options, and no real assurance of a better result.
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Old 09-23-19, 04:17 PM
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Are you still in NYC....may make a bit of difference

but you would be way ahead getting nice used bike or new bike, especially as an old not that highend bike, left outside for a year, maybe with french thread is going to be total pain, the learning will be diluted by frustration

you can start to learn by doing maintenance on the new or new to you bike
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Old 09-23-19, 04:39 PM
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Old 09-23-19, 04:41 PM
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The Peugeot Carbolite is a low-end frame (I think the name comes from high-carbon steel used in the frame) plus it's fairly beat up. It will totally function for riding to/from the gym, and not being desirable to steal. Not worth putting a lot of money into, IMO.

Looking good makes the bike more desirable to steal. So you should pick one or the other. I'd go with "undesirable to steal" as more important, but that's just me.

If you're willing to spend $750, I would totally recommend going for a new bike, or a good used bike, and use that as your looks-nice ride.

You could likely get the Peugeot in functional working order for about $100 paid to a shop for
* true the wheels
* install new/better brake pads
* basic tuneup and adjustment
* maybe purchase new tires if your old ones are dangerously weathered
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Old 09-23-19, 04:48 PM
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Ok, first thing. How tall are you? That bike is pretty small. 5'5 to 5'8?

The cost of "restoration"?? Don't go overboard.
  • SOAP & Water... Good Cleaning.
  • CHEAP... Oil & Grease throughout. Maybe some new bearings. Learn to take apart hubs & etc. Maybe start buying bike specific tools.
  • $50 to $70... New tires
  • $20 for cables and cable housing. If you have time to shop around, we can help you source good deals.
  • $10... New handlebar tape if you wish.
  • $50... New seat? What are the white spots on the seat? Better seats are available.

So, a bit of elbow grease, and somewhere around $100 to $150 and you could have it rolling again.

That is a CHEAP bike. It could be a good commuter, but it will never be tremendously valuable.

The process of rebuilding could be very valuable to you in the future.

Last edited by CliffordK; 09-23-19 at 05:54 PM.
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Old 09-23-19, 05:05 PM
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Spending up to $750 to rehabilitate an old bike that sold for under $200 over 40 years ago seems like a very poor bet. A handy person could probably make this bike rideable for well under $100. Powder coating? Why? The original paint looks pretty good. This is not a project bike, it is a bike that can be made ridable and useful again at a fairly low cost
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Old 09-23-19, 05:30 PM
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Check out the wheels on that. The rims are the death traps that these Peugeots were infamous for. When they get wet you won't be able to stop. I know this from first hand experience as a Peugeot UO-8 was my first real bike. Also, it has 5 speed freewheel, and in general the whole thing is obsolete. Even the tires are probably 27" and not 700c. The fork looks to be bent too. Yea, you can do work on it but why bother.

I'd be willing to help you clean it up since I live in Brooklyn, but I wouldn't put any money into it except for brake pads and cables for safety. Nothing else would make any sense.

My wife's Specialized hybrid only cost $500 and it is a much better bike than you'll likely get this to be.

Also, there is a bike coop on Maujer Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, open on Monday evenings.
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Old 09-23-19, 07:46 PM
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Thanks everyone for these thoughtful responses. I'm leaning towards just doing the minimum to get it in working order for now, as I like doing small projects to exercise my handiness, and it should be a good learning experience while I keep my eyes out for a good used bike on craigslist. Sounds like washing it down and applying some lubricant, then new tires would be a good starting point for this weekend.
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Old 09-23-19, 08:38 PM
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Fork's bent, I wouldn't waste a minute or dollar on that one.
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Old 09-23-19, 08:40 PM
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Cleaning, of course, is pretty straight forward. I like to use a dry rag, and use it with a sawing motion in tight spots, but soap and water also works well.

You can purchase chain oil, or use a light oil.

Penetrating oil, or light oil on cables, and pivot points.

You have major bearings in the hubs, bottom bracket, and headset. These really require disassembly to get to, and then are lubed with a good grease (bicycle grease?). But, you will need some tools. For the wheels, probably 13/14/15mm cone wrenches, plus a 15mm and 17mm open end wrench (or adjustable wrench). I usually use just one cone wrench. Some people like two.

I like to remove the freewheel (which hopefully freewheels). But, there are several different freewheel tools, which are specific to your current freewheel. New bikes with freewheels will have a small splined freewheel wrench, or a cassette wrench. Anyway, the tool may only be needed for that bike and freewheel, so some people just go to a shop to get the freewheel removed. If the freewheel functions properly, you can also service bearings without removing it. Harder to get in and clean, but it is possible.

How many tools you purchase will depend on how excited you get with doing the work.

As mentioned, bike co-ops can also be good resources.

Post questions here.
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Old 09-23-19, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by wxep View Post
I'm leaning towards just doing the minimum to get it in working order for now, as I like doing small projects to exercise my handiness, and it should be a good learning experience while I keep my eyes out for a good used bike on craigslist. Sounds like washing it down and applying some lubricant, then new tires would be a good starting point for this weekend.
Absolutely a good (but challenging) project bike. Keep in mind that the wheels are (I think) chrome-plated steel, the brake pads are old, and the brake cable lube is probably dried out. AVOID riding this in the rain.
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Old 09-24-19, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by wxep View Post
Thanks everyone for these thoughtful responses. I'm leaning towards just doing the minimum to get it in working order for now, as I like doing small projects to exercise my handiness, and it should be a good learning experience while I keep my eyes out for a good used bike on craigslist. Sounds like washing it down and applying some lubricant, then new tires would be a good starting point for this weekend.
All good thoughts, and welcome to BF!

My advice would be to buy a decent bike your size. Go to your local bike shop and have them fit you to a bike. Use that to do your commuting, playtime, whatever, and all the while fix up and learn about the Peugeot.

I envy you in a way. You are on a journey that will take you to the greatest heights that you can imagine. The world of bicycles is fascinating and deep and rich. I've been obsessed with bikes ever since I took my brother's tricycle apart back in '69. Stick around here and you'll definitely get an education!
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Old 09-24-19, 07:44 AM
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WXEP: I was in a similar situation except my bike from the same era mid 80s is a much better bike to begin with and mine was always kept inside. I replaced the tires/tubes about 6 years ago but had not ridden any more than literally a few miles in 25 years. I have a garage and mechanic tools and have always done my own repairs on bikes, cars and boats. I did purchase a "bike tool kit" one of those $50.00 kits some tools in the kit are ok others not. I'm slowly adding on or replacing those tools with park tools.

And to my point, I wanted dual pivot side pull brakes and aero levers. I live in the hills so stopping power is nice to have. I also wanted to more gearing options and clipless pedals . My wheels are ok so I just replaced the bearings, I bought lose BBs. I trued the wheels, disassembled everything installed new brakes and cables, replaced a 6 speed freewheel with a 7 speed, new chain and seat. I have about $300 in all of this, the bike rides fantastic and looks good. I put about 800 miles on it this year, no issues.

But.... I then purchased for what I have in my old bike a used (10 year old) Cannondale which is in a much different league. I would suggest that you go that route. If you want a beater bike, do the minimum to your yours running but no more. For me my old bike has decent components that I might be able to use in different applications and I like to putter around with my bikes so I don't feel bad and consider my fixer upper a good solid back up but for now it's just that, a back up.
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Old 09-24-19, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by wxep View Post
Thanks everyone for these thoughtful responses. I'm leaning towards just doing the minimum to get it in working order for now, as I like doing small projects to exercise my handiness, and it should be a good learning experience while I keep my eyes out for a good used bike on craigslist. Sounds like washing it down and applying some lubricant, then new tires would be a good starting point for this weekend.
The braking on that bike is going to be marginal at best. I recommend new alloy rim wheels. If you don't want to spring for hem that's okay but be extremely leery about riding in the rain, or through puddles or standing water since with those existing wheels braking ability mostly disappears. I'd also get rid of those auxiliary brake levers aka suicide levers as they further reduce the amount of braking you can do. Oh wait, those ones might be okay since the attachment to the main brake lever is directly to the lever and not between the brake lever and brake body. I'd adjust the brake calipers so that the brake shoes are as close to the rims as you can get them without rubbing on the rim.

If the bike is not French threaded it could be a good bike to learn bicycle repair/overhaul on. If you have a bicycle co-op near you and can get there when they're not to busy you'll most likely find someone there who will be happy to show you what to do and how to properly use the tools to do the job. Most co-ops are also a good source of any needed parts.

Good luck and cheers
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Old 09-24-19, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by wxep View Post
Thanks everyone for these thoughtful responses. I'm leaning towards just doing the minimum to get it in working order for now, as I like doing small projects to exercise my handiness, and it should be a good learning experience while I keep my eyes out for a good used bike on craigslist. Sounds like washing it down and applying some lubricant, then new tires would be a good starting point for this weekend.
Get kool stop brake pads there will help with braking on those rims

replacing all the cables would be a good thing, no special tools needed and better shifting and braking .... you can get full cable kits cheap (like $7 at ace hardware https://www.acehardware.com/departme...B&gclsrc=aw.ds)

tubes and tires

it would be really be good to clean and lube the bottom bracket, headset, and wheel bearings

should not take too many tools so either a coop or

speaking of tools you can get a good start for $45 or so https://www.jensonusa.com/Foundation...oaAmEeEALw_wcB
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