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How much Boeshield T-9 for one frame

Old 09-29-19, 03:26 PM
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rseeker
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How much Boeshield T-9 for one frame

How much Boeshield T-9 would it take to interior-coat one full frame? Will one of those little 4 ounce cans do it?

TIA
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Old 09-29-19, 04:22 PM
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I could be wrong, but that I know of, that is for normal lubing of chains and other such components/parts. I have not seen it as a product for interior protection of a frame.
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Old 09-29-19, 06:07 PM
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Actually it was developed by Boeing as a corrosion protectant as well as a lubricant: https://boeshield.com/about/
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Old 09-29-19, 06:24 PM
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ATMO, it is more of a protectant than a lube. Not a bad lube, but a great protectant.
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Old 09-29-19, 06:29 PM
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I know this much frame saver will do numerous frames.

https://www.amazon.com/Weigles-Bicyc.../dp/B0012GO58Y
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Old 09-29-19, 07:39 PM
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I'm more familiar with LPS3. Cheaper and, available at all auto parts stores. Works best on bare frames. Spray it inside. Hook frame from ceiling. Rotate frame all around. Put some newspaper on the ground. Let it drip out on newspaper. Wait until it quits dripping. Done deal. No more rust. Love you. Be good. Have fun.
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Old 09-30-19, 02:30 AM
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My deal is I'm switching from an aluminum frame to steel (i.e. new bike, bought just before the old frame broke on me). I live out in farmland and the drainage is "by nature's design", so a big rain means flooded roads. Last year I submerged my BB three times and one of those got both hubs too, so treating the frame seems like a good idea.

For some reason I thought Weigle's Frame Saver was no longer available. I must have been thinking of something else.
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Old 09-30-19, 08:55 AM
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Problem Solvers bought Frame Savers last month, so that should make it distributed much more widely:

https://www.bicycleretailer.com/prod...rs-product-qbp

and already on Problem Solvers website:

https://www.problemsolversbike.com
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Old 09-30-19, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Numerozero View Post
Problem Solvers bought Frame Savers last month, so that should make it distributed much more widely:
https://www.bicycleretailer.com/prod...rs-product-qbp
and already on Problem Solvers website:
https://www.problemsolversbike.com
I liked Frame Saver, but followed advice originally from @HillRider that Amsoil's HDMP (Heavy Duty Metal Protector) is the same stuff, but twice as much for half the price.
Here's a thread from 2006 where I asked and learned about it.

And here's my reminder-for-self about applying HDMP/Frame Saver to the inside of a steel frame. These steps should work the same with Boeshield T9. This is copied from my OneNote notebook so I can look it up on my phone whenever I am internally-coating a steel frame.
1. cover chainstay holes by rear dropout (unless want to leave open for spray into chainstays)
2. plug top of headtube to block top tube juncture
3. spray 4 seconds into top tube via seat tube opening
4. rotate frame a bit, then plug top of seat tube, rotate frame more
5. spray into head tube, rotate, plug bottom of head tube
6. spray through bottom bracket into chainstays (leaving space for aerosol to come out), seat tube, and downtube
7. plug bottom bracket and rotate frame seatstays and rear brake bridge (and maybe chainstay bridge) depending on where the holes are
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Old 09-30-19, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
How much Boeshield T-9 would it take to interior-coat one full frame? Will one of those little 4 ounce cans do it?

TIA
I used less than half the can.
Once you shoot in the tubes it spreads fairly quickly.
Like others said, I kept turning the frame around and upside down.
In a year or so I'll probably remove the BB and seat post to see how its doing.
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Old 09-30-19, 08:38 PM
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One aspect of Frame Saver is it's ability to coat the interior without it's liquid running over all the surface. It is better to insure the liquid does run over all the interior but reassuring that the aerosol will reach spots that one's various positioning of the frame (to get the liquid to run over all) might miss. I don't know if T-9 does the same.

But so much of this is like the "which chain lube is best" discussions that return so frequently here. I tell my customers that it's like bathing one's body. That you are concerned and use some sort of cleansing "soap" is the real need, not which "soap" you choose.

So use what you find pleasing and agreeable to your sensibilities. Don't worry the fine points, just using some sort of rust inhibitor is the start. And repeat every so often, more frequently if you ride in rust belt winters, coastal salt air or through floods

As to how much to use- enough to have it drip out all over the place there's a vent or opening. With Frame Saver that's 1/4 to 1/3 of a can the way I do it. With T-9 I can't speak to. Andy
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Old 09-30-19, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
My deal is I'm switching from an aluminum frame to steel (i.e. new bike, bought just before the old frame broke on me). I live out in farmland and the drainage is "by nature's design", so a big rain means flooded roads. Last year I submerged my BB three times and one of those got both hubs too, so treating the frame seems like a good idea.

For some reason I thought Weigle's Frame Saver was no longer available. I must have been thinking of something else.
Many fine frames have an opening in the bottom bracket. If yours doesn't drilling a 1/4" hole at the lowest point is a good idea. It will let more water out than it will let in.
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Old 10-03-19, 12:11 PM
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My first frame I used linseed oil. Since then I used Frame Saver.
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Old 10-03-19, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by davidad View Post
My first frame I used linseed oil. Since then I used Frame Saver.
I'm still looking through my choices, but I liked the idea of linseed because it's closer to a natural solution and less like something that would eat my face off (Must for Rust = phophoric acid == off the list).

How did the linseed work out?
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Old 10-03-19, 01:39 PM
  #15  
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The small can of T-9 that you have will be plenty, and you're using it for its best use. It was designed by Boeing to protect metal against corrosion. It's mainly paraffin wax in solvents, and dries to leave a wax film.

It's not a bad lube, but the motion of the chain wears the paraffin off faster than other lubricants. Inside a frame, that nice layer of wax will be undisturbed and smart as paint.
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Old 10-03-19, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
I'm still looking through my choices, but I liked the idea of linseed because it's closer to a natural solution and less like something that would eat my face off (Must for Rust = phophoric acid == off the list).

How did the linseed work out?
If you go that route, make sure you use boiled linseed oil. The unboiled version takes forever to polymerize.
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Old 10-03-19, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
I'm still looking through my choices, but I liked the idea of linseed because it's closer to a natural solution and less like something that would eat my face off (Must for Rust = phophoric acid == off the list).

How did the linseed work out?
Fine. I eventually sold the frame to a friend and it lasted until he rode into a parked mustang. I'm not sure that undercoating is important in a cr-mo frame.
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Old 10-05-19, 11:01 AM
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@rseeker and everyone, have you seen this rust preventative experiment on MTBR? It's why we don't use T9 on our frames.
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Old 10-05-19, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
@rseeker and everyone, have you seen this rust preventative experiment on MTBR? It's why we don't use T9 on our frames.
Not a badly designed experiment, especially for "home grown."

However, one thing should be clear: Very few surface treatments, of any kind, will permanently prevent corrosion. Once it starts, corrosion tends to work under any coating or treatment. Phosphatizing alone is probably one of the best, phosphatizing under a good paint is better. Powder coating hasn't been around long enough to be sure, but it looks good too. The reason I recommend a coating that incorporates zinc phosphate is that I helped develop one of the few paints that would actually prevent rust from spreading once initiated. It was an epoxy-resin-zinc phosphate brushed or aerosol applied paint. It had incredible durability and adhesion, too. Unfortunately the company is no longer in business, though the formula may have been acquired or imitated by another coatings manufacturer. I recommend investigating automotive coatings, as some of them do an incredible job, particularly those used on Volvo, Saab, BMW, and possibly Toyota and Honda. Coatings technology is always changing and growing. What was "best" yesterday has probably been surpassed today.
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Old 10-05-19, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
@rseeker and everyone, have you seen this rust preventative experiment on MTBR? It's why we don't use T9 on our frames.
Yes, great link, thanks for posting that. I ran across that in another Framesaver thread here and read through it yesterday.

From that mtbr test I struck off Fluid Film, even though it was one of the two winners, because somebody talked about a gamey smell (being lanolin-based) and I happened to be eating a leftover pork chop at the time and decided I didn't want to risk my bike smelling like that. Too bad, other than that it was a promising natural-ish solution.

I would have gone with linseed oil, again being natural-ish but the modern boiled version seems not really boiled (?? not sure) and instead has some chemicals in it to speed drying. Maybe not so natural.

So since that leaves me without natural solutions, I picked one of the winners of the mtbr test, the WD-40 Specialist Long-Term Corrosion Inhibitor. I like that it comes as a spray and also that it seems to be mostly colorless, making it easier to pick out rust by the color if I stick a scope in the frame. Several of the others dried yellowish or orangish.

But I think in general any of these would be fine, like Andrew R Stewart said, since anything is way better than nothing, I don't live near a seacoast, and I generally avoid riding through battery acid (for anybody who didn't read it, that was the last phase of the MTBR test).

I didn't buy it yet, but that's the plan.
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Old 10-05-19, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Lightning Pilot View Post
Phosphatizing alone is probably one of the best, phosphatizing under a good paint is better. The reason I recommend a coating that incorporates zinc phosphate is that I helped develop one of the few paints that would actually prevent rust from spreading once initiated.
That's very interesting. Must for Rust shows phosphoric acid as an ingredient on its MSDS, and it claims to be active in stopping and preventing rust. Would you guess there's a similar process involved? (Not sure if you can answer that. And chemistry is not my area.)

Also, and again I'm guessing, but it seemed like something one might not want around aluminum or brazing.

https://images.homedepot-static.com/...269bfd939d.pdf
https://images.homedepot-static.com/...eba9b71933.pdf

Last edited by rseeker; 10-05-19 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 10-05-19, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
That's very interesting. Must for Rust shows phosphoric acid as an ingredient on its MSDS, and it claims to be active in stopping and preventing rust. Would you guess there's a similar process involved? (Not sure if you can answer that. And chemistry is not my area.)

Also, and again I'm guessing, but it seemed like something one might not want around aluminum or brazing.

https://images.homedepot-static.com/...269bfd939d.pdf
https://images.homedepot-static.com/...eba9b71933.pdf
The process is essentially the same: The phosphoric acid is reacting with the iron corrosion products to form a dense, insoluble iron phosphate.

In a zinc phosphate containing coating, the zinc phosphate is moderately soluble. In the presence of moisture and iron oxides, the phosphate combines with the iron, the zinc combines with the oxide.

Yes, you do not want to use phosphoric acid on aluminum. As for brazing, it's also something to avoid. For that matter, any dissimilar metals in the presence of a strong electrolyte, acid, or base. Aluminum is also peculiar in that it is attacked by both acids and bases.

Using a commercial product that contains phosphoric acid is generally the best and or easiest way to go, just a little more expensive. Just remember to RTFM.
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Old 10-05-19, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
So since that leaves me without natural solutions, I picked one of the winners of the mtbr test, the WD-40 Specialist Long-Term Corrosion Inhibitor. I like that it comes as a spray and also that it seems to be mostly colorless, making it easier to pick out rust by the color if I stick a scope in the frame. Several of the others dried yellowish or orangish.

But I think in general any of these would be fine, like Andrew R Stewart said, since anything is way better than nothing, I don't live near a seacoast, and I generally avoid riding through battery acid (for anybody who didn't read it, that was the last phase of the MTBR test).

I didn't buy it yet, but that's the plan.



...seems to work, takes a day or two to drain out and dry on the interior, widely available at Home Depot and Lowes, does not smell like pork chops.
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Old 10-05-19, 04:57 PM
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Alarmer,
I use the rust reformer they make to coat brake lines replaced on pick-up trucks. The new use of brines on roads eats up the brake lines, frame members, and shock tower mounts on trucks like crazy. The brines make the roads safer but wreaks havoc on the steel parts and aluminium they get on. Smiles, MH
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Old 10-06-19, 12:00 AM
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Fluid Film is what I use for my bicycles, motorcycles, automobiles.
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