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Ttianium Seatpost

Old 12-10-19, 07:07 AM
  #1  
Planemaker
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Ttianium Seatpost

I posted a similar thread in the Gravel Forum but, in retrospect, I should have put it here.

I'm looking at titanium seatposts for my gravel bike. I'm a heavier rider and the roads will be rough.

It looks like a lot of the offerings use either the Enve single bolt or double bolt saddle clamp.There appears to mixed experiences with these clamps for the standpoint that the saddle unexpectedly rotates. I would like thoughts and advice on these style of clamps given my weight and riding conditions.

I've also looked at Moots and Salsa who use a clamping system that cinches the saddle position in place independently of the saddle rails. I would also like some thoughts and advice on these clamping systems.
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Old 12-10-19, 10:01 AM
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The problem, as you've found, is that most Ti seatposts are designed with lightness in mind and have lightweight saddle mounting systems which can have problems with heavier riders. I haven't seen them all but I would recommend something sturdier for your weight such as this style with two bolts anchoring everything in place and a beefy mount with a slightly larger clamp area for the saddle rails to keep them from bending. https://www.ebay.com/p/1544415147?ii...CABEgLLQPD_BwE Lighter is always good but sometimes us larger types have to sacrifice a little weight for durability.
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Old 12-10-19, 11:12 AM
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Why titanium specifically? what are expected advantages?

it seems like overall Titanium is the the third choice with Aluminumn and carbon being more preferred

here is an interesting article https://www.cyclingabout.com/seatpos...cling-comfort/
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Old 12-10-19, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
Why titanium specifically? what are expected advantages?

it seems like overall Titanium is the the third choice with Aluminumn and carbon being more preferred

here is an interesting article https://www.cyclingabout.com/seatpos...cling-comfort/

The article listed seems to say that carbon is better at dampening road vibrations - I have been using a Ritchey Flexlogic post for the past year and a half and can attest that it really does dampen vibration nicely. I weigh about #190 BTW and my Ritchey post is the setback model, 350mm length on a compact titanium sloping top tube frame.

With all this said, titanium also has a reputation of dampening road vibration. It may hold up better for a Clyde and can potentially last indefinitely. To maximize the damping effect, it would work better in the setback version on a slightly smaller frame with maximum exposure of the seatpost.

I can’t speak to the durability of different titanium post clamp designs and am curious to hear what folks are saying about the Enve style clamp. Some of the older Control Tech or Syncros 2 bolt designs I would think would be plenty durable. Just to put it out there, some of the Chinese titanium posts that seem to inexpensive to be serious contenders, deserve a serious look. I purchased a 27.2 layback titanium post from China for about $90 and I am quite impressed with the craftsmanship - I have it mounted on a stiff, size 57 vintage Klein Quantum frame with straight gauge beefy aluminum frame tubes. My educated guess here is that the ti post will play a role in muting some of the aluminum harshness on my local chipseal roads.

Last edited by masi61; 12-12-19 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 12-10-19, 03:39 PM
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What size of seatpost are you looking for? Diameter? Length?

I've got a Litespeed seatpost on one bike. I'll have to take a look at anti-rotation. So far no problems with my riding. Designed for use on a vintage MTB, but I have it on the road.

As above though, why do you want Titanium? If you are a heavy rider working it hard... Aluminum? Some kind of moderate suspension post?
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Old 12-10-19, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
I posted a similar thread in the Gravel Forum but, in retrospect, I should have put it here.

I'm looking at titanium seatposts for my gravel bike. I'm a heavier rider and the roads will be rough.

It looks like a lot of the offerings use either the Enve single bolt or double bolt saddle clamp.There appears to mixed experiences with these clamps for the standpoint that the saddle unexpectedly rotates. I would like thoughts and advice on these style of clamps given my weight and riding conditions.

I've also looked at Moots and Salsa who use a clamping system that cinches the saddle position in place independently of the saddle rails. I would also like some thoughts and advice on these clamping systems.
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wouldn't omit viewing Ericksen Ti "sweetposts"...they're all spendy but I can't tell you that I ever detected any difference in comfort on the roadbike nor a Moots mtb (I have one on the Ti frame roadbike, non-gravel grinder w/ 23mm rubber, non-Ti rails on Terry Fly saddle but didn't purchase it for the "smoother" ride...as an aside (IMO) not sure cycling should be placed anywhere near top of the comfort activity category list...some might argue, cycling may be more appropriate in the S/M tolerant category. BTW-I ride a rigid fatbike w/ a rarely used Revive dropper on trail 52W).

One last point, the owner (former ~155# road racer) of my LBS mentioned the only seatpost that he ever snapped while riding/racing was a Ti one (not the result of a crash).

Last edited by stormpeakco; 12-10-19 at 04:37 PM. Reason: addendum
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Old 12-10-19, 05:29 PM
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All good questions and responses, my weight is 240 pounds and dropping.

I'm currently using a Cane Creek eeSilk Seatpost and the ride is great but, the post doesn't play nice with my Relevate Designs Saddle Pack for bikepacking. I was hoping that I could similar ride quality from a titanium post.

I need a post that is 27.2 mm by 350 mm.
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Old 12-11-19, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
All good questions and responses, my weight is 240 pounds and dropping.

I'm currently using a Cane Creek eeSilk Seatpost and the ride is great but, the post doesn't play nice with my Relevate Designs Saddle Pack for bikepacking. I was hoping that I could similar ride quality from a titanium post.

I need a post that is 27.2 mm by 350 mm.
I have a whole host of different seatposts and have used a whole host more of seatposts throughout the last 4 decades. The vast majority of them have been aluminum but I do have a few Ti models in the mix. I can't really say that one is better than another in terms of ride quality, however. I currently use Thomson posts (most of my bikes), Paul Tall and Handsome aluminum, Race Face with the cantilevered collar, Dean two bolt Ti or older Moots Ti Cinch post. I'm a heavy rider but I wouldn't say that any one of them is a better ride than any other. I wouldn't say that one has an advantage over the others in terms of how well they hold the saddle. The Race Face gets an advantage when it comes to adjustment since the clamping bolt and adjustment bolt as completely separate. It has a slight disadvantage when it comes to putting on a saddle bag for bikepacking or for clamping in a work stand.

I have augmented my two...well, three...Ti posts, however. They are rather thin and, while I think they probably won't bent, I added a carbon fiber tube inside to give them a bit more bending resistance.

From the standpoint of riding on rough roads, if you are sitting on the saddle while riding downhill, you are doing it wrong. Frankly, if you are riding with much weight in the saddle on the flats or uphill you are doing it wrong. The saddle isn't a "seat" nor should you be "sitting" on it. It's there to support you. Learn how to "ride light" in the saddle which means a significant amount of weight is hovering over the saddle as you pedal. As FBinNY used to put it be "the gorilla that rides like a ballerina and not the ballerina who rides like a gorilla".

All that said, here's my Moots with a Revelate bag on it

Untitled by Stuart Black, on Flickr

It works but so would any of the other posts I have.
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Old 12-11-19, 04:24 PM
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I have been running the Lynskey 27.2 x 400 25 setback seat post with no issues. It uses the single bolt ENVE clamp. The post has a slight bit of flex and has been comfortable. Somewhat like my Thomson Elite with similar geometry specs.
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Old 12-12-19, 12:24 PM
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Besides compliant tires, another very old tried and true method of dampening vibrations is to use a saddle with springs on it. I know, perish the thought, but it works. Sometimes low tech is best.
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Old 12-12-19, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ctak View Post
Best to lose vibrations in lower psi & supple rubbers. Assuming the right diameter exists, avoid Ti and go for something solid like Nitto's dual bolt S83: https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...bolt-seatpost/
They sell for ~$80 new on eBay.
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When your animation says “Will. Not. Budge.” Are you talking about galvanic corrosion risk with a ti seatpost? If so, this is not a reason to avoid a titanium seatpost. It just requires the use of copper anti-seize and you’re good to go. The Nitto one pictured with a 2 bolt head would be plenty strong but a titanium 2 bolt setback one would be strong and resilient.

Last edited by masi61; 12-12-19 at 01:01 PM.
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Old 12-12-19, 12:58 PM
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I have two large setback ti posts made by TiCycles. 60mm setback so off the shelf wasn't an option. TiCycles uses Thompson 2-bolt hardware, making adjustments simple and a joy to do. Since the TiCycle posts are completely custom, you can work with them to get any available tube. I went ti simply because "why not". Now I am 150 pounds and not hard on equipment. The owner of TiCycles has engineer schooling and machinist training and loves the challenge of designing and making bikes and gear for the unusual.

Ride-wise, my posts are just posts. Yes, I think they do lessen road noise a little but the only real change I saw from going to the Laprade I was riding for nearly a year after my previous post broke was that I finally had the seat back where it belonged! My other bike with that post has had it since day one so I have no comparison to draw on. Both bikes are (for me) stiff ti frames. Stiffer laterally than any steel frame I've owned but still the ti vertical feel.

And my minor complaint - talking about metal posts (and stems and handlebars and frames and ... absorbing road vibration. Elastic metal do not absorb anything. Well, the strong quality metals you want to ride. Tap a bare frame or fork or whatever. They are tuning forks and ring a long time.

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Old 12-12-19, 01:14 PM
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Another seatpost I really like but one that does not dampen anything - the Nitto S-84, the lugged steel post. Large setback, 40 mm. I cannot imagine one of those failing, ever. They are only in 250mm length so modern compact frames need not apply. Beautifully made, a joy to hold in your hands. A joy to install and adjust. Despite all steel, they are not nearly as heavy as they look.

Not what the OP is looking for, but a fun look anyway. This is the Rivendale site, but I bought mine through a local bike shop; paying the same. (I wanted setback and I wanted gravel worthy for my old steel Mooney. On that bike, there simply isn't better.) https://www.rivbike.com/collections/...-2-x-250-11048

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Old 12-20-19, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post
When your animation says “Will. Not. Budge.” Are you talking about galvanic corrosion risk with a ti seatpost? If so, this is not a reason to avoid a titanium seatpost. It just requires the use of copper anti-seize and you’re good to go. The Nitto one pictured with a 2 bolt head would be plenty strong but a titanium 2 bolt setback one would be strong and resilient.
No, was referring to the steadfastness of the 2-bolt wonder that is the s83
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Old 12-20-19, 12:55 PM
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/Moots-Cinch...ty!80487!US!-1

I know the above seller (as he is a former pro mtb racer, now a Dad/husband with a cottage bike shop twenty miles from SS, CO and used to work/manage @ my LBS). With $2 worth of Scotch-brite, some electrical tape to maintain the grain at welded junctions (google some videos) & 15 mins of time, it is stupid easy to massage titanium bike parts back to looking like new (I just did a Merlin compact road frame...wish I could find a 80 mm long used Moots stem for it).
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