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Shimano disc BR-M4545 / BL-M505 oil tube

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Shimano disc BR-M4545 / BL-M505 oil tube

Old 12-28-19, 12:30 AM
  #1  
AlanHK
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Shimano disc BR-M445 / BL-M505 oil tube

I picked up a bike with Shimano disc brakes: BR-M445 with BL-M505 levers. (Note, typo in the thread title which I cannot correct.)
The braking is non-existent, so I need to bleed and top up the oil.

I found a manual for the brakes on Shimano's site, which says
"Be sure to read the service instructions for the “Adding mineral oil and bleeding air”"
But I cannot find this anywhere, plenty of links on old posts all dead.
Anyone have a live link to ones specific to this hardware?

I did find some Youtube videos so I can probably work it out.
To do it I need the oil, which is apparently made from unicorn tears from the cost, some plastic tubing to clip on the nipple on the callipers and a syringe to push/suck the oil.

These brakes are quite old and do not have an oil port on the levers, but just have a big reservoir. So I don't need the (also extortionately priced) Shimano funnel.
I'll get the oil from a bike shop, but the rest I would like to use normal hardware (I'm in Australia, and online purchases cost so much in postage they are rarely justified).
What is the size of the tubing needed? It needs to be an exact fit or it'll leak (or not fit on). And what kind of syringe? Do these have standard sizes I can get at a pharmacy?

Callipers -- oil nipple top left.

Levers, open oil reservoir.


The oil looks OK, not dirty, so I intend to just top it up, not replace.
This bike was put aside in a garage for a few years, neglected but not otherwise abused.

Last edited by AlanHK; 12-28-19 at 12:36 AM.
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Old 12-28-19, 04:05 AM
  #2  
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If you don't mind my Tarzan English, I did a full demonstration of the bleed process:


Used tools are linked in the video description.
Budget brake fluid (mineral oil) that works perfectly fine is Total LHM Plus:

https://www.amazon.com/Total-LHM-Plu...4392011&sr=8-1

Not sure if it's widely available out of Europe, but here it's about 5 euros per litre and works with no problems.
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Old 12-28-19, 04:49 AM
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The new design which uses a funnel is a lot easier to use, would look at the cost of any tools needed vs just replacing them, and selling on ebay as for parts.

Add to that, the old design you have had issues in the cold (at least at in the M775 version) the lever would go very stiff/wooden feel at sub-zero temps (looking at your location Sydney AU? probably not an issue)

Regardless, you really need a bleed/flush, don't know what fluid is in there, but stock Shimano mineral oil is pink, not yellow, although as (Citroen) LHM fluid or Magura Royal Blood could be used as alternates. For the cost, you don't need much, so maybe buying a small bottle of Shimano oil may look as being expensive, but if you bought more, you would be using it.
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Old 12-28-19, 05:13 AM
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Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
The new design which uses a funnel is a lot easier to use, would look at the cost of any tools needed vs just replacing them, and selling on ebay as for parts.

Add to that, the old design you have had issues in the cold (at least at in the M775 version) the lever would go very stiff/wooden feel at sub-zero temps (looking at your location Sydney AU? probably not an issue)

Regardless, you really need a bleed/flush, don't know what fluid is in there, but stock Shimano mineral oil is pink, not yellow, although as (Citroen) LHM fluid or Magura Royal Blood could be used as alternates. For the cost, you don't need much, so maybe buying a small bottle of Shimano oil may look as being expensive, but if you bought more, you would be using it.
I have failed to measure any benefits of using Shimano's fluid, compared to Citroen LHM fluid.
Has anyone measured any poor performance, rubber swelling etc with the LHM fluid? I haven't, not to this day.
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Old 12-28-19, 05:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Bike Gremlin View Post
I have failed to measure any benefits of using Shimano's fluid, compared to Citroen LHM fluid.Has anyone measured any poor performance, rubber swelling etc with the LHM fluid? I haven't, not to this day.
The key advantage is during the warranty period as if you don't use genuine/manufactures fluid, they could reject warranty claims, after this has expired, then choose your favorite brand of compatible fluid.
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Old 01-09-20, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Bike Gremlin View Post
If you don't mind my Tarzan English, I did a full demonstration of the bleed process:
Budget brake fluid (mineral oil) that works perfectly fine is Total LHM Plus:.
Thanks. That looks like a similar model to mine. Most instructions are for the newer ones with a nipple on the levers.
I checked the nipple on the calipers, it has a bulb about 4.5 mm, and a neck of 3.5mm. I got some 3mm bore tubing and that fits snugly.
(Had to buy 5 m of it though, ....)

I found literally hundreds of posts over the last 10 years recommending LHM Plus for Shimano brakes. But, while it is available here, it isn't cheap. Maybe because it's used by Citroen and Rolls Royce. Cheapest I could find in Sydney was $31/litre. And there is a bike shop in the next suburb that has the Shimano oil on sale for $30/litre, so I ended up getting that. Maybe I can resell half of it since they sell 100ml for $20 -- and insanely, 500ml for $50.
https://www.bikebug.com/lubes-mainte...c-196_387.html
(Amazon, etc have shipping charges that make them even more expensive.)

The process you used was to push out through the caliper and top up at the lever. I guess water is more dense and will drain out more easily.
I don't have a bike stand so will take the calipers off but leave the levers on the bars and see how it goes.
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Old 01-09-20, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by AlanHK View Post
Thanks. That looks like a similar model to mine. Most instructions are for the newer ones with a nipple on the levers.
I checked the nipple on the calipers, it has a bulb about 4.5 mm, and a neck of 3.5mm. I got some 3mm bore tubing and that fits snugly.
(Had to buy 5 m of it though, ....)

I found literally hundreds of posts over the last 10 years recommending LHM Plus for Shimano brakes. But, while it is available here, it isn't cheap. Maybe because it's used by Citroen and Rolls Royce. Cheapest I could find in Sydney was $31/litre. And there is a bike shop in the next suburb that has the Shimano oil on sale for $30/litre, so I ended up getting that. Maybe I can resell half of it since they sell 100ml for $20 -- and insanely, 500ml for $50.
https://www.bikebug.com/lubes-mainte...c-196_387.html
(Amazon, etc have shipping charges that make them even more expensive.)

The process you used was to push out through the caliper and top up at the lever. I guess water is more dense and will drain out more easily.
I don't have a bike stand so will take the calipers off but leave the levers on the bars and see how it goes.
The stand was used for better video demonstration (bicycle was black). And brakes were completely taken off to start with.
You can do it with brakes on the bike, probably a lot easier. It would be good if the wheels were off - to avoid any disc contamination. If this is not convenient (no stand, so hard to hold the bike in place), perhaps it would be good to just remove the brake discs when doing the bleeding - just in case. Finally, since only pads really soak the oil, so can't be de-contaminated once in contact with it, you could do it with the discs (and wheels) on, then just make sure to thoroughly de-grease the discs, using 95+ % alcohol (available in supermarkets in my country at least) and some disc brake cleaning spray at the end, just in case.
- If anyone has a more practical idea, please share.
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Old 01-10-20, 01:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Bike Gremlin View Post
perhaps it would be good to just remove the brake discs when doing the bleeding.
Actually, I have some old wheels, non-disc, so I will put those on.

I'll scrub the discs and brake pads while I'm at it.
This bike has been sitting in a basement car park for months at least, so needs a clean all around.
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