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Wheel re-building. Is it possible/worth it?

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Wheel re-building. Is it possible/worth it?

Old 02-17-20, 06:28 AM
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rivers
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Wheel re-building. Is it possible/worth it?

Over the weekend, I went to a local bike jumble sale in search of a cheap rear wheel for turbo use. I ended up with a set of DT Swiss Tricon 1450 wheels with enough life on them to last a season or 2 on the road depending on conditions, but perfect for turbo use. I did a bit of googling when I got home to find that new (5-10 years ago), they cost around 1k. The tricon hub looks to be a slightly redesigned 240 hub. So I'm wondering if it would be worth getting these wheel rebuilt. They are a bit lighter and higher end than my current wheels (DT Swiss R23s).
Thoughts/opinions? As I don't really know much about wheels, or even if they can be rebuilt.
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Old 02-17-20, 07:18 AM
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It's worth it if you really like your hubs but need new rims. It's easier if you have conventional hubs rather than straight pull or paired spoke design. It's convenient when you're replacing with rims of same ERD so you can just move one spoke at a time. New nipples are a good idea.

But for a trainer, as long as the rim is true and holds the tire and pressure, it's fine.
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Old 02-17-20, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
But for a trainer, as long as the rim is true and holds the tire and pressure, it's fine.
Yeah, I have a set of wheels where the brake track is really worn and the rims should be replaced. Almost all my riding these days is done on the trainer (recovering from an injury, only free time it's dark outside), so I haven't found the motivation to actually go ahead and do the effort of actually rebuilding the wheels. One of these days, I'll run out of projects and get to it. Until then, since I'm not using the breaks and the rim walls are strong enough to hold the pressure, why bother?
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Old 02-17-20, 08:15 AM
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rivers
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As i said, it's fine for turbo use. I'm just wondering if they are worth rebuilding for general day to day use, seeing as the wheels are higher end than my current wheels
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Old 02-17-20, 09:09 AM
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Would you be doing it yourself or paying someone else to do it? You'd have to figure in the cost of rims, potentially spokes (if you're not using identical rims to what are on there or the rims were tied/soldered together), and labour (if you're not doing it yourself). Labour costs can vary a lot depending on experience of the builder, but could add a lot.
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Old 02-17-20, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by rivers View Post
Over the weekend, I went to a local bike jumble sale in search of a cheap rear wheel for turbo use. I ended up with a set of DT Swiss Tricon 1450 wheels with enough life on them to last a season or 2 on the road depending on conditions, but perfect for turbo use. I did a bit of googling when I got home to find that new (5-10 years ago), they cost around 1k. The tricon hub looks to be a slightly redesigned 240 hub. So I'm wondering if it would be worth getting these wheel rebuilt. They are a bit lighter and higher end than my current wheels (DT Swiss R23s).
Thoughts/opinions? As I don't really know much about wheels, or even if they can be rebuilt.
What do you mean by "rebuild"?

What problem are you attempting to solve?
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Old 02-17-20, 12:08 PM
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A shop would be the best place to go for advice on what your new wheels need, if anything. I wouldn't assume they need "rebuilding" unless they are wobbly or spin roughly.
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Old 02-17-20, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
What do you mean by "rebuild"?

What problem are you attempting to solve?
They would need new rims in the near-ish future for pro-longed road use as there is not much life left in them. Whereas if I used them solely for the turbo, they wouldn't need anything done to them as they aren't completely worn. They spin true and the spokes and hub are in good nick. The hub is a higher end DT Swiss hub. So I'm wondering if it would be worth having new rims put on and using them for road use, as opposed to relegating them to the turbo?
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Old 02-18-20, 11:23 AM
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It really comes down to cost and your goals. If this is a $$ decision only, are you building the wheels or are you paying someone else? Can you get the same rims and reuse the spokes? If you are doing the builds, do you have experience and do you consider your time money?

I love building wheels and have done many. I do not consider it a "cost" to me. But I do have to be realistic about the time it takes (and down time for the dining room table - best light and music). If you are skilled building wheels, this could be fun. If this is your first, well I'd advise building a more routine wheel(s) first and do your learning on wheels you don't have feeling s toward. (Granted you picked these up cheap. Still, with a quality build, they will be very nice.)

Maybe a good plan would be to build a lesser wheel or two for the learning experience while riding these on the trainer. Take these on when you feel confident, Yes, in total dollars, you have probably spent the most, but you have picked up a skill that could save some money in the future and give you joy and just maybe save your or someone else's butt/day/ride someday.

This is up to you. We can chirp in with tips like reuse the spokes, use new nipples, etc. but the big question is where do you want to be. For many of us, building wheels is a time-out from life when we have to slow down, block out all else and focus on just what is right in front of us. This can be a real gift.

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Old 02-18-20, 01:16 PM
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I am not a fan of odd-ball spoking patterns or hubs. Ride them until they are worn out and build or buy something more conventional and durable.
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Old 02-18-20, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by davidad View Post
I am not a fan of odd-ball spoking patterns or hubs. Ride them until they are worn out and build or buy something more conventional and durable.
+1
Then cut the hubs out, clean them up and sell them. You'll be many miles ahead.
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Old 02-18-20, 09:28 PM
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IF you can find "exact" replacement parts, the task may be more manageable.
However, 18 & 24 spoke wheels aren't really for the inexperienced. You simply don't have as many spokes to "massage" a slightly imperfect rim. The line between even spoke tension and "true" is more difficult.
Rebuilding with used parts also presents problems. Nipple/spoke threads may be corroded to different degrees. Even with new nipples & wire brushed spoke threads, you don't have the "feel" that you get with new parts. If a spoke prep compound was used, things may be much more manageable.
If you want to learn wheel building, start with a semi modest 32/36 spoke wheel cross 3. That would give a good foundation.
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