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Rear axle assembly early 80's Takara Mixte

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Rear axle assembly early 80's Takara Mixte

Old 04-03-20, 07:42 PM
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engineerrock
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Rear axle assembly early 80's Takara Mixte

I'm almost done with a teardown and rebuild on a Takara Mixte rustbucket. It's been a great time sink, but now I've got a problem. I've spent a couple of hours on Google and Sheldon Brown and can't find the answer to this question--probably because it should be obvious.

Problem: When I disassembled the rear solid axle I lost the position on one side--oops

Result: Not sure how the hub is supposed to locate side to side or where the washers / spacers go.

Current situation: Sort of works, but doesn't make sense.

Request: Can anyone tell me if this is right or how it should be? Thanks in advance, this has been driving me nuts. See pictures below.



1. Non-drive side: Two lock washers on either side of frame with grippy side against frame

2. Wheel is slightly off center of the frame to the left.

3. Drive side: Nut bolts right to derailleur hanger. No washers or spacers this side.

4. Outside uts have even insertion into solid axle on either side.

Last edited by engineerrock; 04-03-20 at 07:57 PM. Reason: not able to post pictures
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Old 04-03-20, 08:06 PM
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Unless we had the same hub/axle set up we really can't tell you the combo of spacers and nuts you have, but here's what I do.

I set the cog/RH side first. I use however many spacers/washers with cone and lock nut (and some hubs have a second/inner lock nut too) to achieve the freewheel seat to end of lock nut dimension that works for the freewheel you have. For the typical Asian made freewheel in 6 speed (as example) that dimension is about 34mm (IIRC), this can be test fitted later with the LH side assembled, the bearing adjustment close to correct, the freewheel mounted and the wheel in the frame so a chain can be placed on the small cog and large ring to confirm RH seat stay lower inner end clearance WRT the chain (and remember that the chain kicks up slightly when shifting off the small cog). Whatever is left (spacers/washers) over goes on the LH side.

This gets you the least amount of RH offset and thus the least wheel/spoke dishing for the strongest wheels. If the resulting rim's location (WRT the frame) is too far to the RH side it could be dished over to the left or you could try less RH FW seat to locknut end if you can without the chain contacting the stay end. Or you could transfer some spacers/washers from the LH side to the RH side.

In the future only take off the axle one end's cone, spacers/washers and locknut. This way you have the OEM set up maintained. This stuff is all about tinkering and trying various arrangements. Lastly don't think that the original set up was the best one of even had the rim centered and the chain line proper. Andy.
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Old 04-03-20, 09:28 PM
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Yes, definitely will try not to lose position again. With "chain line" I know now what to look for and found it on Sheldon Brown. Permission to tinker taken also. Thanks much!
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Old 04-03-20, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I set the cog/RH side first. I use however many spacers/washers with cone and lock nut (and some hubs have a second/inner lock nut too) to achieve the freewheel seat to end of lock nut dimension that works for the freewheel you have. For the typical Asian made freewheel in 6 speed (as example) that dimension is about 34mm (IIRC), this can be test fitted later with the LH side assembled, the bearing adjustment close to correct, the freewheel mounted and the wheel in the frame so a chain can be placed on the small cog and large ring to confirm RH seat stay lower inner end clearance WRT the chain (and remember that the chain kicks up slightly when shifting off the small cog). Whatever is left (spacers/washers) over goes on the LH side.

Andy.
This. Back in the day we'd have to removed all the cones and spacers from the axle, usually because the axle broke. Reassembling was a process of trial-and-error to get the cones and spacers in the right place (even if you set them out in order) and the axle centered so the right and left ends came out symmetrical. If they weren't you took off the wheel, redid everything, and reinstalled.
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Old 04-03-20, 09:58 PM
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You will know pretty quickly if you screwed up the spacers as soon as you install the wheel. It will either rub the brakes or it will appear out of line with the seat post. Rear wheel should line up perfectly with the seat tube. Easy peasy.
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Old 04-04-20, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by ramzilla View Post
You will know pretty quickly if you screwed up the spacers as soon as you install the wheel. It will either rub the brakes or it will appear out of line with the seat post. Rear wheel should line up perfectly with the seat tube. Easy peasy.
This assumes a condition prior to the hub overhaul that if one of my co workers made I would scold them if things didn't work out on the first attempt to reassemble. We have no idea if the wheel sat in line with the frame/seat post before. We have no idea if this wheel is the OEM one or if, over the nearly 40 years, it had been exchanged for another.

We, here, can teach how to think or how to repair by numbers. I prefer to teach critical thinking and how to figure stuff out instead of giving the simple sometimes right answer. Andy
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Old 04-04-20, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
This assumes a condition prior to the hub overhaul that if one of my co workers made I would scold them if things didn't work out on the first attempt to reassemble. We have no idea if the wheel sat in line with the frame/seat post before. We have no idea if this wheel is the OEM one or if, over the nearly 40 years, it had been exchanged for another.

We, here, can teach how to think or how to repair by numbers. I prefer to teach critical thinking and how to figure stuff out instead of giving the simple sometimes right answer. Andy
OK. It's time to try plan B. Look around the shop for another bike with the same or similar rear hub axle & spacing. Copy that & you're good to go. (I can never remember how things go together myself. I keep stuff like crank arms, pedal spindles, & bottom brackets within reach just to confirm stuff like thread direction and other stuff),
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Old 04-04-20, 09:32 PM
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Thanks everyone. I ended up just adjusting so the freewheel barely clears the frame when shifting off of the smallest cog. It seems like the wheel is 2-3mm off center away from the drive side but maybe it was just dished wrong in the beginning. The brakes seem to be fine that way. Anyway should be a nice bike for my 12 year old daughter and she's excited to ride it when the rain stops. Not something you see every day.
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Old 04-04-20, 09:55 PM
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It's not uncommon for old wheels to bit by bit get trued over to the LH side. It's easier, and perhaps better for wheel life, to true the rim that way using the less tensioned spokes of the LH side then by tightening the RH side spokes. Andy
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