Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Can't clean oil soaked aluminum rim - No brakes

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Can't clean oil soaked aluminum rim - No brakes

Old 05-02-20, 10:26 PM
  #1  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Can't clean oil soaked aluminum rim - No brakes

Hi folks. I'm new here having found the forums googling this problem. It may be hopeless at this point, but i thought I'd at least try asking.

I've not been able to get the caliper brake pads to grab on my bike's rear wheel since a local shop rebuilt the hub and replaced a broken spoke on the aluminum rim back in the middle of March. I've tried spinning the rim and aggressively wiping with acetone, isopropyl alcohol, and soap and water repeatedly. And then sanding the face of the brake pads each time in hopes of exposing unaffected material. But nothing has been successful. There's no oily residue, but pressing my thumb against the side of the rim and dragging, I can confirm it's pretty slippery. Not like the front rim at all. Google tells me aluminum can actually absorb oil, and that welders have to heat aluminum to be able to purge it.

Google found a post in these forums on 'Oil and Mineral Spirits on rim" from 2011, and another 'Can't get rid of WD40 on the rims. I'm a fool!' from 2010 where people suggested using mineral spirits or a spray can of brake parts cleaner. I'll check tomorrow to see if there's any auto parts stores that might be open during this virus lock-down that may carry that brake cleaner. Then maybe go call the bike shop on Monday and see if they're open.

Has anyone here dealt with this problem, or found that mineral spirits or brake parts cleaner may actually pull the oil out of an aluminum rim? Neither OP on those threads reported back on whether or not they had any success. Sorry I can't link those posts to their URL's yet as I'm getting a notice saying I need to post 10 times 1st.

Thanks
Mark

URL workarounds:
'Oil and Mineral Spirits on rim"
www(DOT)bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/756913-oil-mineral-spirits-rim.html
'Can't get rid of WD40 on the rims. I'm a fool!'
www(DOT)bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/699496-can-t-get-rid-wd40-rims-i-m-fool.html
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-02-20, 11:24 PM
  #2  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 11,717

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 226 Times in 178 Posts
Toss the pads & get new.
Soap & water cleans grease.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Likes For Bill Kapaun:
Old 05-02-20, 11:29 PM
  #3  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 1,685

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 133 Times in 111 Posts
I'm a pro mechanic and I've never seen anything that didn't clean up with some iso and maybe scotchbrite or fine sandpaper. I'd use scotchbrite or fine sandpaper and get new pads.
cpach is offline  
Likes For cpach:
Old 05-03-20, 01:49 AM
  #4  
tFUnK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,691

Bikes: Too many bikes, too little time to ride

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 40 Posts
I feel like we're missing the part of the story of how the oil got onto the rim in the first place.

But yes, try different/new pads.
tFUnK is offline  
Likes For tFUnK:
Old 05-03-20, 01:52 AM
  #5  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 1,685

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 133 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by tFUnK View Post
I feel like we're missing the part of the story of how the oil got onto the rim in the first place.

But yes, try different/new pads.
Shop may have oiled the nipples before truing the wheel, or handled the rim with greasy hands. I often do this when truing wheels. I also have definitely gotten oil on the brake track before, but I always carefully clean everything before returning to the customer and have never had a problem with rim contamination.
cpach is offline  
Likes For cpach:
Old 05-03-20, 03:02 AM
  #6  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This does sound nuts, doesn't it? But I've spent hours in several attempts over the past month trying to wipe off whatever got onto this rim.

I pulled the wheel off the bike last month, pulled off the tire, tube and rim strip.. then took the rim to a local shop for repair. As I was reassembling everything, I didn't notice the rim feeling oily at all. The guys at the shop had cleaned it up nicely when they handed it over to me. The bike was still sitting on its seat and bars as I left it, the pads still as they were. But they sure slipped like all heck when I got it all together.

If any oil got onto the pads at that point, I'd think it would have been very little, and that a hearty sanding would bring up uncontaminated material below.

...So I just gave wiping the rim with acetone again another go. And like all my other attempts, it just endlessly leaves black residue behind. I'm wondering if that may be aluminum oxide. Does that make sense? Should a really well cleaned rim still feel at bit slippery to a finger pressed and dragged against it after a cleaning like this?

I've been hesitant about swapping the front brake pads to the back, and potentially ending up contaminating them too. But maybe I'll try that next. As I've written, aggressive cleaning with alcohol and dish soap didn't work either.

Originally Posted by cpach View Post
I'm a pro mechanic and I've never seen anything that didn't clean up with some iso and maybe scotchbrite or fine sandpaper. I'd use scotchbrite or fine sandpaper and get new pads.
Yeah... just tried a scotchbrite with acetone with no success. I've wiped the rim with isopropyl on paper towels a couple times.

Last edited by Mark68; 05-03-20 at 03:07 AM.
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-03-20, 08:03 AM
  #7  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 7,410

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1097 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 352 Posts
Brakleen should get any contamination off your brake tracks, but I would suggest you spray it onto a rag or paper towel to avoid getting it on your paintwork or rubber items. If the residue is silicone oil a wash with detergent and thorough rinse, both with VERY hot water may do the job.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Likes For dsbrantjr:
Old 05-03-20, 10:55 AM
  #8  
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 3,771

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 374 Times in 289 Posts
Is this a bike you ride regularly? If it's one you just got out of storage and had fixed up, then the brake pads might just need to be replaced. As well, if it's the old single pivot style brakes, while adequate, they never were the best. And brake pads on bikes from the 70's and 80's were always hard to find satisfactory replacements for me. So I swapped all mine to more modern double pivot brakes that I can get proper pads for.

Also might be that the shop left the caliper release open and you just need to flip it down.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 05-03-20, 01:05 PM
  #9  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for your feedback folks, but I really overlooked what should have been obvious.

I shouldn't have assumed the brake adjustment wasn't going to need going over again when I mounted the wheel again. I've always had a hard time figuring out how to adjust these Shimano cantilever brakes. I have the toughest time getting enough space between that small cylindrical housing the main cable slides through and the barrel adjuster on the frame.

That's what the problem is again. That housing is pulling up and hitting the barrel adjuster. I got it set a few years ago, but I'm struggling to figure out how I did it. I found a pretty good video on this type of brake on Youtube. I'll have to give this a rest for a while and study that video a bit closer later in the day.

https(COLON)//www.treefortbikes.com/Shimano-Altus-CT91-Rear-Cantilever-Brake-includes-Link
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-03-20, 01:46 PM
  #10  
MNebiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: MN
Posts: 116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 35 Posts
I had a kid take his new bike home, got his dad's bottle of Armorall, and proceeded to proudly wipe down every square inch of his shiny new bike. Then his dad brought it back complaining it had no brakes. It took several cleanings of the rims with brake cleaner and a new pads to get it back to functional.

Brake clean or carb cleaner should clean it up, but may take several passes. Both are tough on paint. Throw away the pads.
MNebiker is offline  
Likes For MNebiker:
Old 05-03-20, 03:38 PM
  #11  
Russ Roth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: South Shore of Long Island
Posts: 819

Bikes: 2010 Carrera Volans, 2015 C-Dale Trail 2sl, 2017 Raleigh Rush Hour, 2017 Blue Proseccio, 1992 Giant Perigee, 80s Gitane Rallye Tandem

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked 203 Times in 153 Posts
After building a wheel I just spray it down with glass cleaner and a rag, doesn't really matter what oils they used, aluminum rims don't absorb oil and then continue to contaminate the brakes. If you've plenty of brake pad take a knife and cut a thin slice off of the pads, rubber pads don't really absorb oil all that much. Clean the rim with glass cleaner or a soapy cloth with dish soap and shave the pads, if the problem comes back you've got something wrong with the pads that I doubt is the fault of the bike shop.
Russ Roth is offline  
Likes For Russ Roth:
Old 05-03-20, 05:08 PM
  #12  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,564

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2417 Post(s)
Liked 478 Times in 369 Posts
[QUOTE=Mark68;21452929]Thanks for your feedback folks, but I really overlooked what should have been obvious.

I shouldn't have assumed the brake adjustment wasn't going to need going over again when I mounted the wheel again. I've always had a hard time figuring out how to adjust these Shimano cantilever brakes. I have the toughest time getting enough space between that small cylindrical housing the main cable slides through and the barrel adjuster on the frame.

That's what the problem is again. That housing is pulling up and hitting the barrel adjuster. I got it set a few years ago, but I'm struggling to figure out how I did it. I found a pretty good video on this type of brake on Youtube. I'll have to give this a rest for a while and study that video a bit closer later in the day.

https(COLON)//www.treefortbikes.com/Shimano-Altus-CT91-Rear-Cantilever-Brake-includes-Link[/QUOTE

This sounds like the pull up yoke or the link wire button (they do the same job but with different cable pathways) on the straddle cable is too close to the cable housing stop/barrel adjuster. This happens when the pads are too worn or the rim too narrow for the pad width. (Choose your side of the proverbial mirror) The lever/cable pull amount is less then the yoke's/button's travel before the pads make rim contact. Solutions are to bring the pads closer to the rim. New pads (of the same kind) will be less worn. Cantis and linear brake pads often have some sort of pad/arm spacer adjustment. For classic cantis that was a smooth shaft that slid within an eyebolt securing the pad to the canti arm. For many current linear brakes it's two choices of pad mounting spacers (Shimano's CX cantis have additional spacers to better reach narrow rims. The link wires are available in different lengths. This effects the amount of clearance between the link wire's button and the frame stop/adjusting barrel. Do know this also effects the leverage and feel of the system. Check out the Sheldon Brown pages of canti brakes and their set ups. It is very common for the rear brake's link wire to be shorter that that of the ft. As the clearance in the back is less then the ft this makes sense. But we see yoke/button contacting the stop/adjusting barrel often enough to know this stuff is not well understood by many. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 05-04-20, 06:57 AM
  #13  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
This sounds like the pull up yoke or the link wire button (they do the same job but with different cable pathways) on the straddle cable is too close to the cable housing stop/barrel adjuster.
Yup! That's what was happening.

Solutions are to bring the pads closer to the rim. New pads (of the same kind) will be less worn.
This is what I did a while ago. These are Shimano cantilever brakes with one of those link wires.

I followed instructions in a YouTube tutorial where I slackened up the barrel adjusters at the grip and link wire ends. Then with a rubber band around the back end of the pads, brought the pads square with the rim and tightened. I had to fiddle with the pads and barrels some, but eventually got the brakes to where they at least grab before the link wire button hits the barrel adjuster.

I think the link wire is too big. It measures 2 11/16" which converts to 68.2625mm. Looking at Sheldon Brown's page on these, he shows they come in 63mm, 73mm, 82mm, 106mm, and 93mm lengths. I have no idea why mine falls between 63mm and 73mm. But I'm guessing the 63mm version would probably fix things.

The only problem there is the end of the existing brake cable is quite frayed, and I have no tool that can clip it. Well, maybe it's time for a new tool and/or new cable.

Cantis and linear brake pads often have some sort of pad/arm spacer adjustment. For classic cantis that was a smooth shaft that slid within an eyebolt securing the pad to the canti arm.
Yes... that's what I've got.

For many current linear brakes it's two choices of pad mounting spacers (Shimano's CX cantis have additional spacers to better reach narrow rims. The link wires are available in different lengths. This effects the amount of clearance between the link wire's button and the frame stop/adjusting barrel. Do know this also effects the leverage and feel of the system. Check out the Sheldon Brown pages of canti brakes and their set ups. It is very common for the rear brake's link wire to be shorter that that of the ft. As the clearance in the back is less then the ft this makes sense. But we see yoke/button contacting the stop/adjusting barrel often enough to know this stuff is not well understood by many. Andy
Yup... That was me! Between the YouTube video and finally being able to visualize how it all comes together, I've got a bit better grasp on it. Thanks for your feedback Andy.
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-04-20, 07:15 AM
  #14  
DaveSSS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 5,832

Bikes: TWO Colnago C-RS w/Chorus 12

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 416 Post(s)
Liked 151 Times in 118 Posts
If there's oil on the rim, the brake pads should have been cleaned, or replaced first. Oil is best removed with mineral spirits or naphtha/white gas/camp stove fuel. Acetone can damage paint and doesn't work as well either. No type of alcohol works nearly as well, in comparison. Soap and warm water works too, if there's enough soap, like dish washing soap and it's thoroughly riseld.
DaveSSS is offline  
Likes For DaveSSS:
Old 05-04-20, 07:55 AM
  #15  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,564

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2417 Post(s)
Liked 478 Times in 369 Posts
One can not use a link wire for the straddle cable at all. A separate straddle cable and a separate yoke/pull up can easily be bought for only a few dollars and thus you end up with an infinitely adjustable straddle cable length. One good think about Shimano becoming the 500 lb gorilla it now is, is that they have done a very good job at directing frame designers (read as bike brands) to make sure their frames (and speced out complete bikes) are compatible with Shimano's components. Shimano has published a huge amount of frame/component dimensional specs for bike brands to follow. Canti boss location WRT the rim width is one. Distance from the bosses to the cable stop/barrel adjuster is another. Of course the ideal dimensions are not always what we end up with as well as things like wheels can be subbed or replaced that fall out of spec. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 05-04-20, 08:50 AM
  #16  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
One can not use a link wire for the straddle cable at all. A separate straddle cable and a separate yoke/pull up can easily be bought for only a few dollars and thus you end up with an infinitely adjustable straddle cable length. One good think about Shimano becoming the 500 lb gorilla it now is, is that they have done a very good job at directing frame designers (read as bike brands) to make sure their frames (and speced out complete bikes) are compatible with Shimano's components. Shimano has published a huge amount of frame/component dimensional specs for bike brands to follow. Canti boss location WRT the rim width is one. Distance from the bosses to the cable stop/barrel adjuster is another. Of course the ideal dimensions are not always what we end up with as well as things like wheels can be subbed or replaced that fall out of spec. Andy
The term 'straddle cable' is new to me, as was 'link wire' before I tracked down a photo that matched what I have. I'm not quite sure what you mean by saying, "One can not use a link wire for the straddle cable at all." I don't think I've suggested that's what I'm doing. Googling 'straddle cable' brings me back to Sheldon Brown's page that describes it as an older braking system with a wire that connects left and right cantilevers, running over a triangular 'yoke' in the center that the main brake cable terminates at.

Not being all that familiar with a lot of the relevant terminology, I've had to search for what the parts on my brake system are called. 'Link wire' being the 1st. That straddle wire you mention is a new one. But what I have are Shimano Altus CT91 Rear Cantilever Brakes and a link wire system. Are you suggesting that I could buy a straddle wire and yoke, and maybe solve the problem of the link wire button hitting the barrel adjuster?

You didn't comment on my suggestion that perhaps getting a 63mm link wire might solve my problem. Brown writes that the link wire technology is the preferred option for mountain bikes which is what I've got.

Last edited by Mark68; 05-04-20 at 09:24 AM.
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-04-20, 06:39 PM
  #17  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,564

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2417 Post(s)
Liked 478 Times in 369 Posts
My bad writing got in your way of understanding. One can replace the link wire with a "classic" straddle wire running from canto arm end to the other arm end. The primary cable (what most call the brake cable) is secured to this straddle cable with a clip.Your description shows you found the right images to understand.

One reason I avoided writing about link wire lengths is that how one measures becomes their "correct size". hand a ruler to 10 people and ask them to measure the same item and you can get 11 different measurements.

Sheldon was a professional bike mechanic who valued both time and solutions. In the shop time can be more important if the results are similar. Like I tried to say Shimano has invested a lot to make the time of set up less and the range of results narrower. But supply chain and actual fabrication VS component picks are not a consistent thing so I tried to introduce you to the other time tested (as in many decades before Shimano became that 5oo lb thing) option of not relying on set straddle wire halves (which is what a link wire is, one half of a straddle wire). When one needs dimensional options why seek a solution only available is set sizes, when another option is infinitely variable? Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 05-04-20, 08:37 PM
  #18  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ah yes. So a straddle wire running over a yoke would be an option for better adjustability. I see a really nice looking Tektro Deluxe Yoke Silver BRH05 & cable from Harris Cyclery listed on Sheldon Brown's website with, "two small grub screws let you secure the transverse cable so it won't slide."

Re-reading Brown's cantilever page, he explains how the link wire solved the yoke/straddle wire problem that popped up with mountain bikes. If the main brake cable snapped, the levers would spring apart dropping the straddle wire that would catch the knobby tire, and then whoops! So I may see if I can find a 63mm link wire locally, bring it home and hold it up with the existing one to confirm it's shorter. If not, I could easily return it and maybe go with the yoke option.

EDIT: Or ride the bike to the store!
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-04-20, 09:30 PM
  #19  
drlogik 
Senior Member
 
drlogik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,097

Bikes: '87-ish Pinarello Montello; '89 Nishiki Ariel; '85 Raleigh Wyoming, '16 Wabi Special, '16 Wabi Classic, '14 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 22 Posts
They may have sprayed some parts in the shop with silicone spray and it got on your rims. Silicone is the bane of wood finishers, bamboo rod builders and anyone that needs to paint or varnish a surface. Since you have tried all of the solvents that typically get silicone to break its bond with no avail, try some straight "Orange Degreaser". This stuff can sometimes work miracles. Be sure to rinse the rim well with water afterward and then wipe down with denatured alcohol, ethyl alcohol or similar. Oh, and use new pads and see if that works.

This stuff:

drlogik is offline  
Likes For drlogik:
Old 05-04-20, 09:49 PM
  #20  
Mark68
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I suppose I should point out for people who haven't followed the whole thread, that the problem wasn't slippery rims at all. It was the rear brake link wire button that was pulling up and hitting the barrel adjuster as the brakes were applied. But thanks for everyone's cleaning solutions.
Mark68 is offline  
Old 05-04-20, 10:31 PM
  #21  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 404 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 107 Posts
^ This

John
70sSanO is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.