Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Convert from interrupted to uninterrupted RD cable

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Convert from interrupted to uninterrupted RD cable

Old 05-22-20, 03:23 PM
  #1  
tbenjaminsen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Tromsoe, Norway
Posts: 13

Bikes: 2014 Mondraker Factor XR 29er, 2017 BMC SpeedFox 01 XT/XTR, Kona Wo fattie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Convert from interrupted to uninterrupted RD cable

Hi all!

First post, so please go easy on me :-)

I知 currently rebuilding a Trek 4300 Disc for my 10yo son. I知 going all the way, refinish, new brakes, new drivetrain, conversion from a 3x to 1x setup, the whole shebang! For the rear derailleur I would prefer uninterrupted wiring, but the frame is clearly manufactured with interrupted wiring in mind. I知 really not a fan of exposed shifting cable, both from an aesthetic and weather sealant perspective.

Would it at all be possible to drill or cut the interrupter lugs to fit the cable with housing, allowing for a fully uninterrupted routing of the shifting wire?

TIA,

Tom
tbenjaminsen is offline  
Old 05-22-20, 03:58 PM
  #2  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 7,492

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) '82 nishiski,

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1342 Post(s)
Liked 625 Times in 439 Posts
long term you will get worse shifting by doing this as there will be increased friction from the housing. if it were better overall or had any significant concerns high end bikes would do this....but you only see this in very old or low end bikes. If you are dead set on this, you could try it just using zip ties rather than permanently modding the frame
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
squirtdad is offline  
Likes For squirtdad:
Old 05-22-20, 04:01 PM
  #3  
_ForceD_
Senior Member
 
_ForceD_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1,551

Bikes: Several...from old junk to new all-carbon.

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 135 Posts
What's the problem with exposed shifting cables? I mean that's really the norm. IMO, if it were possible to have absolutely NO cable housing (and it probably is)...that's how I'd go. When you have housing, that just creates friction, and someplace for moisture, and possible gunk to accumulate.

Use stainless cables and use less housing.

Dan
_ForceD_ is offline  
Likes For _ForceD_:
Old 05-22-20, 04:48 PM
  #4  
dsaul
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 1,896
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 571 Post(s)
Liked 415 Times in 289 Posts
All of the frames I build are made with no cable stops. I only use cable guides for full length cable housing and have never had a problem with shifting performance. The only exposed spot for "gunk" to get in is at the derailleur and that is no worse than an exposed cable setup, which has at least 2 spots for that gunk to get into the housing.

For the OP - I wouldn't drill out the stops, because it will be difficult to do and you may want to switch back. There are several different adapters that bolt into the cable stops and provide a cable guide for the cable housing. This is one of those adapters. https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...199&category=7
dsaul is offline  
Old 05-22-20, 04:51 PM
  #5  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 7,865
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 44 Posts
Short answer: use the housing stops as-is. They're better than what you want to do.

Well designed bikes have historically used exposed cable whenever possible. Full length housing is heavier, lazier, and offers mushy performance when the setup is anything older than brand-new. I suspect it must be cheaper for frame manufactures, since I can't think of another reason why it's becoming common on new bikes. As far as aesthetics, I'm also not a fan of the appearance of full-length housing.
FastJake is offline  
Likes For FastJake:
Old 05-22-20, 05:37 PM
  #6  
tbenjaminsen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Tromsoe, Norway
Posts: 13

Bikes: 2014 Mondraker Factor XR 29er, 2017 BMC SpeedFox 01 XT/XTR, Kona Wo fattie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
long term you will get worse shifting by doing this as there will be increased friction from the housing. if it were better overall or had any significant concerns high end bikes would do this....but you only see this in very old or low end bikes. If you are dead set on this, you could try it just using zip ties rather than permanently modding the frame
Thanks for the input, these are all valuable considerations to be included in the decision process.

The main reason for the wish to go full length is weather sealant. We live far up north in Norway, and the weather is probably at the harshest end of the scale, featuring moist, rainy, muddy and snowy conditions, well, kinda most of the time.

On a side note, I知 a little baffled over the comment regarding full length housing on lower level/cheaper/older bikes - my 2014 Mondraker Factor XR, which I firmly believe is a high-end FS trail bike, has full length housing, and I致e never had any shifting problems or excessive friction from the housing. Go figure 🙂
tbenjaminsen is offline  
Old 05-22-20, 05:47 PM
  #7  
tbenjaminsen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Tromsoe, Norway
Posts: 13

Bikes: 2014 Mondraker Factor XR 29er, 2017 BMC SpeedFox 01 XT/XTR, Kona Wo fattie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by dsaul View Post
All of the frames I build are made with no cable stops. I only use cable guides for full length cable housing and have never had a problem with shifting performance. The only exposed spot for "gunk" to get in is at the derailleur and that is no worse than an exposed cable setup, which has at least 2 spots for that gunk to get into the housing.

For the OP - I wouldn't drill out the stops, because it will be difficult to do and you may want to switch back. There are several different adapters that bolt into the cable stops and provide a cable guide for the cable housing. This is one of those adapters. (Link removed due to insufficient posting privileges).
Great reflection, it is also quite in line with with my observations and conclusions, although I value the input from the other comments also.

Oh, and thanks for the link to the adapters - I wasn稚 aware such existed, and they may well be the smartest route for solving the challenge 👍🏻
tbenjaminsen is offline  
Likes For tbenjaminsen:
Old 05-22-20, 07:19 PM
  #8  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,667

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1606 Post(s)
Liked 1,203 Times in 793 Posts
Hooded or sealed end caps.

https://jagwire.com/guides/end-caps
dedhed is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright ゥ 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.