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Choosing proper Tires and Wheels

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Choosing proper Tires and Wheels

Old 06-07-20, 09:02 AM
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MeagreAger
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Choosing proper Tires and Wheels

I mistakenly walked into the bike shop with my roadbike from the late 80s, asking if to order two wheels for under $200. Not only are wheels more expensive, they wouldn't be readily available in my bike's dimensions. My question is first, how do I properly measure the dimension of the wheel, should I remove the tire beforehand? Next, is Ebay the best bet for finding older wheels that would fit my bike, or is there another resource? If it would help I can upload pictures of my David Scott Ironman Centurion. Thank you in advance!
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Old 06-07-20, 09:44 AM
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What's wrong with the wheels that you have? What're you trying to accomplish?
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Old 06-07-20, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by MeagreAger View Post
If it would help I can upload pictures of my David Scott Ironman Centurion. Thank you in advance!
Well they shouldn't be blowing you off even with such a low budget.
But your wheel size issue is probably with the hubs and not the rims.
I'd guess 126mm 7sp freewheel and 700c rims.
If the hubs are still good, you could get new (not fancy) rims laced on for not too much more than $200.
You could even learn to do it yourself and have a nice story to tell.
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Old 06-07-20, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by MeagreAger View Post
I mistakenly walked into the bike shop with my roadbike from the late 80s, asking if to order two wheels for under $200. Not only are wheels more expensive, they wouldn't be readily available in my bike's dimensions. My question is first, how do I properly measure the dimension of the wheel, should I remove the tire beforehand? Next, is Ebay the best bet for finding older wheels that would fit my bike, or is there another resource? If it would help I can upload pictures of my David Scott Ironman Centurion. Thank you in advance!
The tire size should tell you the wheel diameter: xx-622 or xx-630 or otherwise.

i don't know about older wheels, but it is too hard (read: expensive) to find, just get modern wheels. As somebody posted above, it could be 126mm hub width. Current road bike wheels are usually 130mm. If your frame is steel, you could spread it to fit the modern wheel.
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Old 06-07-20, 11:55 AM
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I'm not certain if I can say with specificity, but I was told by a mechanic that it can't be trued because the component of the spoke used for adjustments is damaged.
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Old 06-07-20, 11:58 AM
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The wheels on an Ironman are always 700c.

There are decent new 700c 126mm freewheel wheelsets out there for under $200 a pair. Not superfancy or superlight, but sealed bearing and good, solid reolacements.
Try Velomine or Wheel & Sprocket.

Likely your wheels cannot be trued because the nipples are stuck to the spokes and won’t turn. Not an unusual situation for a 30+ year old bike.
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Old 06-07-20, 12:08 PM
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Find a new bike shop. Preferably one that has been around a while if possible. Or a co-op in your area. The component used for truing is called a spoke nipple and if the mechanic is unable to change one of those out you don't want them truing your wheel.
Now if you want to change wheels for something (lighter, faster, whatever...) then you might have to work at it since it may require drive train changes depending on what you want to accomplish.
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Old 06-07-20, 03:31 PM
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Yeah, find another bike shop. Even warped rims and damaged spokes can be repaired without replacing an entire wheel. Just depends on whether it's cost effective.

This site has specs for most Ironman models: Vintage Centurion Bicycles

The Ironman took standard 700c tires. The rims are probably Araya, Wolber or comparable good quality mid-range rims, measuring 622x14. Wheel and tire sizes are confusing. But the typical Ironman original wheels -- Araya or Wolber -- will have rims listed as 622x14, which will be compatible with tires ranging from 700x20 to 700x25. The rims will accept wider tires, up to 700x28, but the frame probably will not. My Ironman barely has room for 700x25 tires, mostly because larger tires will scrape the rear brake bridge.

Even if you need to replace the wheels, you can be a set of comparable wheels from Shimano and many others for around $200 for a pair. You can mail order them from Amazon or many online discount vendors. Or check bike forums sales forum for good used wheels.
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Old 06-07-20, 05:56 PM
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You can certainly find your own wheelsets for a bike of that age. The issue of whether you can DIY the adjusting of the wheelbearings, change out the freewheel or freehub and cassette and know correctly what spacing between the drops you need to look for can be a lot for first timers. As well, get tools that might be only used once in your life.

So letting a bike shop get you the correct wheels new might be just as cheap, even though they will be more than 200 bucks. There is more to changing wheels than just buying wheels.
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Old 06-08-20, 05:45 AM
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I would find a new bike shop. Those guys are not helpful at all. Where are you located generally? We could make recommendations on a shop to trust.

Is there a bike coop in your city? That's be the place to go: knowhow, inventory of used wheels, available tools to suit your cassette lockring or freewheel...

Also, what is preventing you from reading the manufacturer's marks or decals on the rim, hub, and cassette/freewheel, and then telling us here. That would make the job easier for those of us who cannot see your wheelset.

EDIT: Please begin by explaining why you think that you need to replace your wheelset.
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