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Going tubeless?

Old 06-11-20, 12:35 AM
  #1  
venomx
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Going tubeless?

If I get another puncture Iíll consider tubeless. Ideally I want to be able to replace inner tubes on my own but itís impossible with this current setup. I suppose now they have been used and stretched a bit it might be easier next time. ( it took me and a mechanic 1hr30 just to get my tyres on the rim) Iíve also ordered that tool someone suggested from amazon
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bbb-Cycling.../dp/B00A855QRY

Iíll do some research into tubeless, are you less likely to get punctures that way ?
My rims are tubeless ready so always an option

Only thing is if you get a puncture with tubeless tyres and the sealant canít fix it, you have to buy another tyre ?
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Old 06-11-20, 01:57 AM
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Why it's impossible to replace a tube with your current setup? It shouldn't be.
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Old 06-11-20, 02:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Amt0571 View Post
Why it's impossible to replace a tube with your current setup? It shouldn't be.
the bike mechanic said it was the most difficult set of rims heís ever worked with. And it took both of us to do it. Therefore itís impossible on my own
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Old 06-11-20, 02:23 AM
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I have only used Schwable Pro One tubeless 25C onto carbon rims so far, but I have to agree virgin setup is the worst, in my experience it takes two people, 2 pairs of hands to actually mount the the tyre, and I have done 3 pairs of them. Taking them off and remounting is much much easier as the bead will have stretched, if stranded by the side of the road fitting a tube is doeable.
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Old 06-11-20, 02:31 AM
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Originally Posted by venomx View Post
the bike mechanic said it was the most difficult set of rims heís ever worked with. And it took both of us to do it. Therefore itís impossible on my own
Something is wrong there. I'va had some rim / tire combinations that were difficult. In some instances I have broken tire levers. But in any case, it should be something doable at the side of the road.

What are you supposed to do if you get a puncture 50km from home and you can't repair it?
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Old 06-11-20, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Amt0571 View Post
it should be something doable at the side of the road.

What are you supposed to do if you get a puncture 50km from home and you can't repair it?
thats what Iím getting at. Itís not possible to do it on my own. And to be fair I donít go far from home anyway . If i get another puncture Iíll consider going tubeless or getting rims which are easy to put tyres on . Bike mechanic lives near me so shouldnít have a problem either way
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Old 06-11-20, 02:59 AM
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Originally Posted by venomx View Post

Iíll do some research into tubeless, are you less likely to get punctures that way ?
For road riding, it isnít that you get fewer punctures, itís that the sealant are able to deal with most of them unassisted. You might need to top up the pressure though.
Originally Posted by venomx View Post
Only thing is if you get a puncture with tubeless tyres and the sealant canít fix it, you have to buy another tyre ?
That CAN happen, if the cut is long enough. Often itís possible to remove the tire, then put a patch on the inside to get some more life out of it.
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Old 06-11-20, 10:19 AM
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I just bought a new pair of GP5000 tires and thought for about a nano-second about trying the tubeless variety. Then I remembered the video I watched...
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Old 06-11-20, 08:45 PM
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What kind of rim tape are you using? Switch to a thin/slippery "tubeless" rim tape if you haven't already.

I've come across combinations that were very difficult over the years. I avoid those. Tubeless is not a "solution" for a tire/rim combination so difficult that even your mechanic complains (but it's also possible your mechanic is no good.) Get different tires if you have to. I never carry tire levers, because I can remove all my tires by hand.
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Old 06-11-20, 10:18 PM
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My hands are raw after taking off and putting on tires today without tools.
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Old 06-12-20, 02:14 PM
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If you get a puncture that won't seal on its own, you'll need to use road bacon. If the road bacon doesn't work (very serious puncture > 1/4") you'll have to insert a tire boot and tube.
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Old 06-12-20, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Elvo View Post
If you get a puncture that won't seal on its own, you'll need to use road bacon. If the road bacon doesn't work (very serious puncture > 1/4") you'll have to insert a tire boot and tube.
+1

Sealant is first line of defense, bacon strips 2nd line of defense, spare tube + boot 3rd line of defense.

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Old 06-12-20, 02:56 PM
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Are we talking about a road bike, where you might go 50 miles from home? I tried tubeless... specifically Pirelli PZero 700x25c tires on Fulcrum Racing3 2-way wheels. What an expensive mistake!

IMHO, for tubeless to make any sense at all you need wider tires and also wider wheels than I've got. Much wider.

Apparently all "bacon" repair plugs aren't equal - the Lezayne variety didn't well work for me! If you're gonna rely on bacon plugs, you should probably practice using them at home before trying them along a roadside. Once plugged, you should plan on installing a brand new tire at the first opportunity because riding at road speeds on a plugged tire is a very bad idea. Note: if the plug is in the part of the tire that contacts the road,
you'll hear and feel a bump on every tire rotation. That's the road, trying to pull the plug out. Come to think of it... you should probably avoid turns.

You should certainly plan on carrying a spare tube, plus shop towels because you're gonna be a sticky mess when you install them. It won't be a quick job.


venomx... I think a different set of wheels might be a good investment for you, so that you can swap tires/tubes independently and much more easily.
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Old 06-12-20, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by BritishV8 View Post
Are we talking about a road bike, where you might go 50 miles from home? I tried tubeless... specifically Pirelli PZero 700x25c tires on Fulcrum Racing3 2-way wheels. What an expensive mistake!
I would say so, as the P Zero Velos are not tubeless, but straight clinchers. The only tubeless road bike tire from Pirelli is the Cinturato Velo TLR, which are fantastic (I put about 5,000 miles on a set.) So if you had a bad experience with P Zeroes tubeless, I can see why.

Originally Posted by BritishV8 View Post
Apparently all "bacon" repair plugs aren't equal - the Lezayne variety didn't well work for me! If you're gonna rely on bacon plugs, you should probably practice using them at home before trying them along a roadside. Once plugged, you should plan on installing a brand new tire at the first opportunity because riding at road speeds on a plugged tire is a very bad idea. Note: if the plug is in the part of the tire that contacts the road,
you'll hear and feel a bump on every tire rotation. That's the road, trying to pull the plug out. Come to think of it... you should probably avoid turns.
Dynaplugs are designed to be used for the life of the tire, and I have done so. I've plugged tires at under 500 miles, and ridden them plugged until cords were showing at +3,000 miles. Almost everything in that quote is wrong, save for the part about not all plugs being equal.

You also don't need ot throw away a tubeless tire with a hole in it. So long as cords haven't been cut, you can patch it from the inside with a typical tube patch. I've also done that, many, many, many times.
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Old 06-12-20, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I would say so, as the P Zero Velos are not tubeless, but straight clinchers. The only tubeless road bike tire from Pirelli is the Cinturato Velo TLR, which are fantastic (I put about 5,000 miles on a set.) So if you had a bad experience with P Zeroes tubeless, I can see why.
I grabbed the wrong name... the tires I tried were indeed Cinturatos. One of them got a sidewall cut on the very first ride. The other lasted longer... but still not very long. They were way too fragile for the roads I ride on.

How can you be sure whether cords have been cut? You're supposed to ream the hole a bit as part of the plugging procedure, so it seems damaging cords is likely.

If venomx needs to remove a tubeless tire and patch it from the inside... well, that's not really solving the problem of hard-to-remove tires, is it? If you've had to patch tubeless tires from the inside "many, many, many times", I can't comprehend why you've put up with them. Not when tubes are cheap, when swapping out a tube should only takes a couple minutes, when tubes don't require sealant, etc.

Last edited by BritishV8; 06-12-20 at 11:14 PM.
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Old 06-12-20, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I would say so, as the P Zero Velos are not tubeless, but straight clinchers. The only tubeless road bike tire from Pirelli is the Cinturato Velo TLR, which are fantastic (I put about 5,000 miles on a set.) So if you had a bad experience with P Zeroes tubeless, I can see why.




Dynaplugs are designed to be used for the life of the tire, and I have done so. I've plugged tires at under 500 miles, and ridden them plugged until cords were showing at +3,000 miles. Almost everything in that quote is wrong, save for the part about not all plugs being equal.


You also don't need ot throw away a tubeless tire with a hole in it. So long as cords haven't been cut, you can patch it from the inside with a typical tube patch. I've also done that, many, many, many times.

Why? You also said bacon strips can be left in for the life of the tyre. Seems like en unnecessary extra step if you can just plug it, like you said, with a bacon strip. - I mean why all this work to seal up a system that should just self seal with Stans in the first place and that you claimed to be able to seal for the life of the tyre, with a bacon strip, in the even that liquid sealant doesn't do what its supposed to do?


From my experience, big gashes in ordinary clinchers doesn't repair well with ordinary tube patches. They stretch and the gash opens a little. Ridable in a pinch, but lumpy.
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Old 06-12-20, 11:32 PM
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Sealant is good for +90% of punctures. Most happen and I donít even know, until I see Orange Seal all over the seat tube when I get home. Plugs are for punctures around 3-4mm around. Dynaplug makes ďmegaĒ plugs that will fill 6-7mm holes, but I donít have that tool or those plugs, so they get patched.

The roads here are absolutely awful, covered in thorns, and equally as much broken glass. As Iíve had to say in every single tubeless thread on this forum, I donít run tubeless tires because theyíre chic or en vogue. I run them because without, I would get a flat a week. On these roads, the choices are armored tires like Gatorskins, tubeless, or buying tubes in bulk. I donít much care for messing with tubes on the side of the road, and Gators roll like garbage, so itís tubeless.

I'm not trying to convert anyone. I not a proponent of the ďtubeless experiment.Ē You either need them or you donít. And when you need them, youíll know.
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Old 06-12-20, 11:39 PM
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Things Iíve pulled out of my tires:
  • staples
  • rivets
  • pallet staples
  • nails
  • screws
  • springs
  • thorns
  • wire
  • glass

Just a few days ago I pulled a 1.5Ē 16ga brad out of my rear tire. Didnít even notice it until I got home. Try that with a tube. A year or so back, I rode 30+ miles with a 3/4Ē #9 door hinge screw stuck in my back tire. Got home, removed the screw, put in a patch, and rode the tire until cords were showing.
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Old 06-13-20, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Things Iíve pulled out of my tires:
  • staples
  • rivets
  • pallet staples
  • nails
  • screws
  • springs
  • thorns
  • wire
  • glass

Just a few days ago I pulled a 1.5Ē 16ga brad out of my rear tire. Didnít even notice it until I got home. Try that with a tube. A year or so back, I rode 30+ miles with a 3/4Ē #9 door hinge screw stuck in my back tire. Got home, removed the screw, put in a patch, and rode the tire until cords were showing.
Wow. In all my years of cycling, over 50 at this point, all I've ever found in my tires is glass when I've had a flat. Maybe you need to move to NYC to get some better roads.
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Old 06-13-20, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by zacster View Post
Wow. In all my years of cycling, over 50 at this point, all I've ever found in my tires is glass when I've had a flat. Maybe you need to move to NYC to get some better roads.
Here in Missouri, it seems like thumbtacks (the flat ones) and nails are the most common cause of a flat...
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Old 06-20-20, 05:19 AM
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When/if I get another puncture Iíll strongly consider going tubeless

Only just got these continental contact travels which are advertised as being very puncture resistant. Theyíre so fast on road and very good off road too

Does the rim tape play any role in tubeless tyres ?
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Old 06-20-20, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by venomx View Post
When/if I get another puncture Iíll strongly consider going tubeless

Only just got these continental contact travels which are advertised as being very puncture resistant. Theyíre so fast on road and very good off road too

Does the rim tape play any role in tubeless tyres ?
Tubeless rim tape does 2 things: First, it provides a seal for all of the spoke holes so that the rim is air tight. Second, it is very thin so that it makes it much easier to install a tubeless, and also a tube type tire on a tubeless ready rim. If you are having trouble installing your tube type tires, check to see what sort of rim tape was installed on your wheels next time you have to take the tires off.
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Old 06-20-20, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
Tubeless rim tape does 2 things: First, it provides a seal for all of the spoke holes so that the rim is air tight. Second, it is very thin so that it makes it much easier to install a tubeless, and also a tube type tire on a tubeless ready rim. If you are having trouble installing your tube type tires, check to see what sort of rim tape was installed on your wheels next time you have to take the tires off.
+1. If you are using tubeless rims but not tubeless tape, you are making life very difficult for yourself.
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Old 06-20-20, 11:26 AM
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If I need some new rim tape is it easy to remove and fit the new one ?
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Old 06-20-20, 01:19 PM
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So Iím less likely to get a flatty with tubeless ?
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