Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

When oil went in, mud ran out

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

When oil went in, mud ran out

Old 06-23-20, 07:23 AM
  #1  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
When oil went in, mud ran out

I have a fat bike. I could only ride it on good roads, and keep it in good condition. But that would be boring. I avoid the ocean, and salt water, but ride it anywhere else.

A few years ago, the river rose, and a lot of roads became flooded. To me, to see what people do during times of floods is interesting. So at times I rode it through flood waters. Normally not more than 600 mm or 2 feet deep. The fat tires create a huge amount of resistance when riding in water, so it is difficult to go too far on flooded roads. Most roads go up and down, so it is normally only deep for short stretches.

I have ridden many times on dirt tracks, and often through mud. Of course the bike gets mud all over it.

The bike has 3 speed on the front, and a 9 speed freewheel on the back. I think it is Shimano.

The freewheel started catching. That is I would be riding along, and the wheel would turn the pedals. The freewheel was locking on.

I had a tire and tube replaced recently, as well as new brake calipers.

The mechanic was a young boy, maybe 12 years old. I told him about the freewheel, and he did not know how to take it apart. He put some oil in it and it worked properly most of the time.

Since that improved it, I thought I would put a lot more oil in it. I waited until I was a long way from where I live, or other people live. I lay the bike on its side, and put the back wheel up on a raised section of concrete, so I could still turn the pedals. I put some oil on the top of the freewheel, and spun it with the pedals. Then more oil and spun it again. I did this many times. I am amazed how fast oil runs into it. I eventually stood the bike up, and found there was plenty of oil on the chain already. There was also oil on the brake disc. I use the front brakes when going in a straight line, so I am not so concerned about that. Below where the freewheel had been was mud mixed with oil.

It works like new now.

I know, some of you would pull it apart, and use grease. Then you would not ride in mud, or suggest I pull it apart and put fresh grease in it after every time I ride through mud.

I have discovered a quick and easy fix, can still ride through mud, and still have a lot of fun.

I am actually surprised how easily mud gets in the freewheel. I thought it would be well sealed.
alo is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 07:31 AM
  #2  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 13,768

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2495 Post(s)
Liked 565 Times in 436 Posts
Bearing seals don't totally prevent water (and the slurry of grit, like dirt/mud) from entering the bearings. But seals do keep the big stuff out and keep the bad water in.

As I read the OP I shuddered and hoped that I never have to service this poor bike. It sure sounds like it's been neglected, service wise, for way too long. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 07:33 AM
  #3  
shelbyfv
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,172
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1810 Post(s)
Liked 1,181 Times in 671 Posts
So you traded your rear brake for a functioning freewheel.... Thanks for disposing of your waste oil in a responsible manner
shelbyfv is offline  
Likes For shelbyfv:
Old 06-23-20, 07:36 AM
  #4  
HillRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 32,253

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1438 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 260 Times in 209 Posts
If you ride through 2 feet of water, there isn't a freehub (that's what you have, not a freewheel) made that's sealed well enough not to allow water inside. If you continue to ride in those conditions, you will have to learn how to maintain and overhaul your bike frequently. Otherwise the hubs, headset and other bearings will be damaged and have to be replaced. Your freehub was just the first to show the problem.
HillRider is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 09:20 AM
  #5  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
If you ride through 2 feet of water, there isn't a freehub (that's what you have, not a freewheel) made that's sealed well enough not to allow water inside. If you continue to ride in those conditions, you will have to learn how to maintain and overhaul your bike frequently. Otherwise the hubs, headset and other bearings will be damaged and have to be replaced. Your freehub was just the first to show the problem.
It is a freewheel. All of the gears are joined together in one piece. This surprised me. The dérailleur is Shimano. I assume the freewheel is too. It is 9 speed. I had thought those with more gears were cassettes.

I bought it in SE Asia. Bikes are less expensive than the US. So it is easy to replace the bike. There is a new 26 inch fat bike with full suspension for sale here for US$250, I think. So it is not a big deal to replace the bike. Also, most bike mechanics here have little knowledge compared to the US. So getting unusual things done is difficult.
alo is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 09:38 AM
  #6  
tomtomtom123
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 964
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 316 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 100 Times in 71 Posts
Your first problem is submerging you hub, pedals, derailleurs, chain, and bottom bracket in water. 60cm is almost as high as the wheel. Almost all of your moving parts were submerged.
Riding in low mud on the ground is not the same as submerging completely in deeper water. You should try to keep the moving parts dry.
tomtomtom123 is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 09:56 AM
  #7  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by tomtomtom123 View Post
Your first problem is submerging you hub, pedals, derailleurs, chain, and bottom bracket in water. 60cm is almost as high as the wheel. Almost all of your moving parts were submerged.
Riding in low mud on the ground is not the same as submerging completely in deeper water. You should try to keep the moving parts dry.
and not have any fun.

If I had an expensive bike, I might be concerned. It costs very little to replace the bike.
alo is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 10:04 AM
  #8  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
In another place, people were buying fat bikes for $300, and hiring them out where people rode them on the beach, in salt water. They hired them for $10 per day. So when they had hired them for more than 30 days, they were already making a profit. You should have seen the bikes after being ridden in the ocean.

I look after my bike very well in comparison.
alo is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 10:43 AM
  #9  
KenCarlson
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 42

Bikes: 2011 Specialized Roubaix, Specialized Crosstrail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by alo View Post
It is a freewheel. All of the gears are joined together in one piece. This surprised me. The dérailleur is Shimano. I assume the freewheel is too. It is 9 speed. I had thought those with more gears were cassettes.
Well I'll be... there is such a thing as a 9-speed freewheel:
https://www.sunrace.com/en/products/detail/mfex9

Last edited by KenCarlson; 06-23-20 at 10:46 AM.
KenCarlson is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 12:48 PM
  #10  
Ferrouscious
Some Weirdo
 
Ferrouscious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: SW OH
Posts: 378

Bikes: '86 Maruishi Excellence, '86 Schwinn Prelude

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 50 Posts
That wasn't mud, that was rust. Do whatever you want with your bike, just don't involve me.
Ferrouscious is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 02:42 PM
  #11  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 1,824

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 316 Post(s)
Liked 90 Times in 72 Posts
Your wheel bearings and bottom bracket may be next.

I once toured with a guy who at the end of his previous season rode his entire bike into the ocean. He'd heard of the custom of dipping one's wheel, but he took it a step farther. He put the bike away for the winter with no maintenance, then decided to cross the continent again the next year. About 1000 km into the ride, his bike started falling apart. It started with repeated chain failures, then the wheels started wobbling on destroyed bearings, and finally the bottom bracket fell apart. He couldn't afford the repairs or a replacement bike so he went home.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 03:16 PM
  #12  
solman
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: NJ
Posts: 38

Bikes: Trek 720 Hybrid, Trek FXS-5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
All of us enjoy a little fun now and again that's for sure. Most of us don't have $250-$300 to throw around and so would not intentionally dip our bikes in knee deep water and mud. It might be a necessity in a storm or unusual circumstances but then a full cleanup and lube are in order.
If this works for you have at it, but I don't think most of us here on these forums would do this.
solman is offline  
Old 06-23-20, 08:19 PM
  #13  
spelger
Senior Member
 
spelger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: reno, nv
Posts: 393

Bikes: yes, i have one

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 183 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 75 Posts
Its your bike. i say ride it the way you want to. if it is not a big thing to replace then have as much fun with it as you want.

i could not do it though (poor bike).
spelger is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 12:40 PM
  #14  
dmanthree
Senior Member
 
dmanthree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northeastern MA, USA
Posts: 1,087

Bikes: 2017 Roubaix

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 385 Post(s)
Liked 74 Times in 53 Posts
At this point, I'd just spring for a sealed gearhub.
dmanthree is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 01:21 PM
  #15  
krecik
Senior Member
 
krecik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tredegar, Wales
Posts: 358

Bikes: coastie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 54 Posts
It's not hard to overhaul a freewheel, at least the one's I've seen, you can do it easily yourself. There's lots of good info on sheldon brown, they often have a ring with pin holes on it. It has left hand thread so clock wise to unscrew. You can use a tool or a screwdriver an a hammer. Clean out the innards with white spirit and dry everything whith a rag. Put some light lube on the pawls and secure the bbs on their races with grease. Put it all together and boom, done.
krecik is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 09:16 PM
  #16  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
Some people talk like the bike is going to break really soon. This is my third year with the bike. I have replaced tires and brakes. The bike just keeps going. If I get 5 or 6 years, then pay $250 or $300 for a new one, to me, that is not bad. Buying a new one also gives me a full set of spares.
alo is offline  
Old 06-26-20, 04:25 AM
  #17  
krecik
Senior Member
 
krecik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tredegar, Wales
Posts: 358

Bikes: coastie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by alo View Post
Some people talk like the bike is going to break really soon. This is my third year with the bike. I have replaced tires and brakes. The bike just keeps going. If I get 5 or 6 years, then pay $250 or $300 for a new one, to me, that is not bad. Buying a new one also gives me a full set of spares.
You posted this in the mechanics sub forum so people are going to give you mechanical advice. The bike isn't not going to break (not straight away at least) but this is just a really poor way of doing it. Of course if you don't plan to change the way you use it then there's really no point in a propper overhaul. I just don't really understand why you made this thread. You don't seem to be asking for advice so what is it that you want? A pat on the back? Idk man, if you like your method and you're not gonna bother doing it properly because you treat your bike as a consumable then why did you post this? Do you need everyone's approval? Do what you want man, it's your bike.

Kret.
krecik is offline  
Old 06-26-20, 12:03 PM
  #18  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,122

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 742 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 197 Posts
Would it not be easier to just replace the freewheel? Why bother oiling it in that way and loose you rear brake? All around win-win. Recycle the old freewheel.
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 06-27-20, 12:41 AM
  #19  
alo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 191 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 92 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by SJX426 View Post
Would it not be easier to just replace the freewheel? Why bother oiling it in that way and loose you rear brake? All around win-win. Recycle the old freewheel.
A bit of dust lands on the disk and absorbs the oil. When the brakes are applied, it gets wiped off. The oil is soon gone.
alo is offline  
Old 06-27-20, 04:30 AM
  #20  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,122

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 742 Post(s)
Liked 300 Times in 197 Posts
alo If I understand correctly, the brake pad doesn't absorb any oil. Or are you expecting the brake pad to get hot enough to burn it out? On a rear brake?
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.