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The Cascade of changes

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The Cascade of changes

Old 07-28-20, 06:43 AM
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chip.mcbride
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The Cascade of changes

Just had my first lesson...I was reading a few posts and someone mentioned the cascade effect...I know first hand now what that means. I have a Schwinn Paramouint 30 PDG. I've had since 1996. I've been riding a lot lately, just on the road and paved trails. It had old piranha pro 2 inch tires...aggressive tread and quite dry. I have a specialized parts bike and thought I'd swap to the thinner tires 1.95. Not much thinner but with more of a road tread....Wow...the old tire had a 6 speed cassette...I noticed the new one had 7...after getting it mounted...and then the brakes had to be adjusted to accomodate...and then there was the fact the shifter was only made for 6. I pulled the other shifter off the specialized...but its a newer shimano combo, brake and shifter...2 selectors, one up and one down....which required removing the original grip...which doesn't really "slip" on or off anymore...so I had to cut it off...and then realized the cable was frayed and after unsuccessfully thinking I may just unwind the frayed strand just to get it working again...Ended up ordering new cables and grips. Got the cable installed in the newer brake/shifter combo, new clamp on grips installed, derailleur dialed in for the 7 speed...brake cable adjusted....and realized the cogs on the derailleur look a little wonky...some are flat, some are pointy, like sharks teeth, but some are broken forward and some are back...so those are on order....but the bike is rideable and I have a deeper bond with this bike than I had before...it isn't fancy, but it's mine...
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Old 07-28-20, 07:01 AM
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The truncated teeth on the cassette cogs are likely put there as part of the system to ease shifting. If you look you will likely find that they are symmetrically arranged around the cog.
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Old 07-28-20, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
The truncated teeth on the cassette cogs are likely put there as part of the system to ease shifting. If you look you will likely find that they are symmetrically arranged around the cog.
Thank you. The cassette teeth look good. I was referring to the ones on the pulley cog on the derailleur...I'm sure they have a proper name that I have yet to learn.
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Old 07-28-20, 07:20 AM
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The top pulley on the derailleur is the guide pulley, the bottom one is the jockey pulley/wheel. https://www.bicycling.com/repair/a20...bike-repair-3/
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Old 07-28-20, 10:38 AM
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The only thing that makes me happier than upgrading bikes is riding them. You are in a good place.

I even love it when stuff breaks. Gives me an excuse to get something better.
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Old 07-28-20, 10:58 AM
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I just got back from a 12 mile ride on the Rails to Trails here...It is pretty flat, hence I've made the changes to take advantage of that environment. Wow. The new to me shifter (from a newer parts bike) shifted so much better than the Altus C10...The thinner tires with the less aggressive thread felt better...easier to get up to speed and easier to maintain....The tires were from the same bike, and the rear cassette is a 7 speed...I haven't actually compared the two to see where the difference in the gearing is...higher or lower, but I did the same 12 miles in about 4 minutes less. A little lubrication helped too I'm sure...I degreased the derailleur pulleys and sprayed some lubricant on them....This ride felt so much smoother...easier gear transitions...just an all around better ride....something I should have looked at doing sooner....and yeah...already looking at what else I can do to it...luckily for me, my neighbor has a vintage 10 speed that hasn't seen the light of day in years....I get to replace the tubes/tires/liner and dry rotted grips on it when the parts come in.....is it weird that I'm excited to get that bike back into riding condition, and it isn't even mine?
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Old 07-29-20, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
The only thing that makes me happier than upgrading bikes is riding them. You are in a good place.

I even love it when stuff breaks. Gives me an excuse to get something better.
Just been reading the threads and looking online...apparently I really need to convert my hubs to quick release style...but only if I use the color coordinated skewers...which means I need a set of cone wrenches...LOL...once you realize how every doodad can be swapped...and it only takes time and a little skill...this is addicting...so, 20$ here and there: you quickly realize how much you can sink into a bike as a labor of love. I plan on using the old quick release from the original front tire...but I really should keep the rim and tire as one never knows when I may need it for another project later....The spouse is rolling her eyes as I figure out where I should start storing these extra parts.
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Old 07-29-20, 07:34 AM
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Donít worry, weíve all done that one moment or another, and I mean both the cascade and the joy of repairing an old bike.

Back in October 2019 (looks so long ago with this dreadfull social isolation..,), Iíve cracked one of the crank arms of my venerable Dama (itís Lady in portuguese, and yes: I put names on my bikes...). And so the story begins...

No problem, letís replace it! It was about 9 years/10000km (some 6000mi) old, so it was surely tough (and it held me at 157kg/345lb, now Iím about 120kg/265lb).

But I wanted to install a wide range 48-36-26T crankset, instead of the previous 48-38-28T, so the Shimano FD-TX800 front and RD-TY500 rear had to be replaced for A FD-M371 front and RD-M370 rear.

The chain was surely old, so was replaced for a new 8s one.

As I was replacing crank and chain, it was recommended to replace the cassete for a new one. I choosed a SunRace CSM680 11-40T 8s, wider than my derailleur capacity, so I bought a derailleur hanger extension too.

Everything was fine and I rode my Lady for another month and a half, until itís frame cracked at the drive side dropout! Probably it was fatiguing for a while, but I think the shorter ratio drivetrain had something to do with accelerating that (and my now sudden courage to climb just about any steep climb I find...). So I had to replace the frame itself, which led to a new fork and seat post.

In the end, she inherited only the wheel set, brakes, seat, stem, handlebar and shifters from Dama. Everything else was replaced, either as I told here, or due to being worn, or to sheer desire to do so...

In my opinion, a frame change is a bicycle change, so I rechristened her Xica (from Xica da Silva, an abolished female slave from Brazilian history): she is all black and beautiful, as is told from the historic figure.

TLDR: crank arm crack starts an almost complete bike replacement.
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Old 07-29-20, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by dwsmartins View Post
Donít worry, weíve all done that one moment or another, and I mean both the cascade and the joy of repairing an old bike.

Back in October 2019 (looks so long ago with this dreadfull social isolation..,), Iíve cracked one of the crank arms of my venerable Dama (itís Lady in portuguese, and yes: I put names on my bikes...). And so the story begins...

No problem, letís replace it! It was about 9 years/10000km (some 6000mi) old, so it was surely tough (and it held me at 157kg/345lb, now Iím about 120kg/265lb).

But I wanted to install a wide range 48-36-26T crankset, instead of the previous 48-38-28T, so the Shimano FD-TX800 front and RD-TY500 rear had to be replaced for A FD-M371 front and RD-M370 rear.

The chain was surely old, so was replaced for a new 8s one.

As I was replacing crank and chain, it was recommended to replace the cassete for a new one. I choosed a SunRace CSM680 11-40T 8s, wider than my derailleur capacity, so I bought a derailleur hanger extension too.

Everything was fine and I rode my Lady for another month and a half, until itís frame cracked at the drive side dropout! Probably it was fatiguing for a while, but I think the shorter ratio drivetrain had something to do with accelerating that (and my now sudden courage to climb just about any steep climb I find...). So I had to replace the frame itself, which led to a new fork and seat post.

In the end, she inherited only the wheel set, brakes, seat, stem, handlebar and shifters from Dama. Everything else was replaced, either as I told here, or due to being worn, or to sheer desire to do so...

In my opinion, a frame change is a bicycle change, so I rechristened her Xica (from Xica da Silva, an abolished female slave from Brazilian history): she is all black and beautiful, as is told from the historic figure.

TLDR: crank arm crack starts an almost complete bike replacement.
That's an awesome history (bikes and actual history). I would imagine that at your size and the desire to climb hills, you had to become a wrench turner. It would seem you'd have to customize your machine for the stress you can push through the cranks and into the frames.
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Old 07-29-20, 08:02 AM
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Sure! Heavy downhill rims, wide 2.3Ē tires, 36 (per wheel) stainless steel spokes with brass nipples are on my wheels. The hubs are cheap Shimano HB-RM40/FH-RM30-8, but thatís the best Iíve found here with 36 holes back then (here in Brazil the norm is 32 holes or less) and I care then often (every 3000km/1800mi), as well as the headset. Hollowtech bottom bracket and crank are also in it. Everything to handle my weight.

Xica is truly a heavyweight steel behemoth, at 13,5kg/30lb. Itís frame isnít light and that was never my intention. Sheís just dumb strong...

Iím the heaviest part of the bike, after all. Why would I be a weight wiener? Also, as you said, I really like to be a wrench turner, not as a professional activity, though.

EDIT: touched the submit button before itís done.

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Old 07-31-20, 06:58 PM
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Ended up taking both tire's hubs apart and re-packing them with grease...I noticed some wobble in the rear wheel....repacked and adjusted the cone nuts...all snug and no wobble. The original plan was to swap the orginal front tire axle to be able to use the quick release...completely different hub...the OG schwinn uses the captured bearing....and the Specialized uses the typical 9 loose bearing style...thanks to this forum and youtube...I knew when to call it quits and the swap...and just repacked both hubs...soooooo smoooooth now....I will still look at swapping axles later down the road when I need new tires....get some sweet looking matching red parts to make it all sexy...and maybe a disc brake. Next purchase will be simple...a separate tool box to house the bicycle tools....
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Old 08-24-20, 05:21 AM
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Replaced the guide pulley and jockey pulley last night. Most parts I've replaced have been with the red ones, when I can find them. Lots of nice red farkles to make it pop. I should get some new pedals in today. I will post a photo when I'm getting it close to what I hope is completed. I let my daughter ride it for a little bit. Her face lit up when she ran through the gears and made a few turns on the cranks. "Oh my, it's so smooth." Yep. It's a labor of love. I have a new front wheel arriving soon and a rotor, disc brake caliper kit in the storage box to install. Not really needed, but it's a little hard to stop upgrading once I've seen how relatively easy it is.
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Old 08-24-20, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by chip.mcbride View Post
The spouse is rolling her eyes as I figure out where I should start storing these extra parts.
Build a separate bike shed.
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Old 08-24-20, 05:32 PM
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Got the pedals in today.....the old ones did not want to come off...I convinced them by cutting into them with the saw...then I could get on there with a wrench and a hammer....The new ones have allen screws....so much easier. I'm almost done. I swapped the old 26 inch wheels out for the 27.5, narrower, less aggressive ones. That also gave me 7 gears in the rear (which meant a new shifter, well, new to the bike, but still used) New jockey and guide pulley wheels, seat post clamp and bar grips. Repacked bearings. I have a new front wheel ordered, that I can utilize a disc brake with. I have a hydraulic caliper, adapter, brake lever on stand by. This site, coupled with youtube has been awesome. I probably could have bought a newer bike, but where is the fun in that. This one rides like a dream now. Effortless shifting.
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Old 08-24-20, 05:47 PM
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You shouldn't run your gears large to large, the drivetrain isn't really designed to do that.
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