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Is it worth putting $200 into my old Trek bicycle?

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Is it worth putting $200 into my old Trek bicycle?

Old 08-19-20, 08:55 AM
  #26  
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I would say no, its not worth it. Why? Well the OP says "I have a Trex bicycle that I purchased around 1994. I always loved that bike. It has about 24 gears, if I recall correctly." Its Trek and how does a bike have about ?# of gears. Sounds nostalgic but suspect the bike hasn't been ridden (let alone seen the light of day) in years. Now with the pandemic the owner wants to pull it out of storage and ride it again. But I question whether after getting the work done, the urge to ride will have passed, and it will go back into its dark hole again. I also understand the supply of new bikes is constrained right now and repairs are taking weeks. Hate to rain on someones parade but!
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Old 08-19-20, 09:05 AM
  #27  
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There isn’t any parade.

While we’re at it, maybe suggest new derailleurs and a crank for another $100.

Since the shop owner will probably be dumpster diving for cans between jobs to feed his family.

John
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Old 08-19-20, 09:17 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by headwind15
As A bicycle store owner/ mechanic for over 12 years, I find the term "a different rear sprocket to move the gears more correctly" disturbing. The mechanic is making up this terminology up. NEWSFLASH: there are no sprockets that will make your gears move more correctly. This is very similar to a car mechanic saying that your muffler bearings are shot! (in case you didn't know it, mufflers do not have bearings).
not correct. freehwheels and cassettes have shaped and "ramped" teeth that help with shifting. These started about the same time indexing started. So the OP could certainly have a freewheel or cassette that is just straight teeth or an early version of shaped and ramped teeth and moving to newer, more evolved design can certainly improve shiffting
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Old 08-19-20, 10:15 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad
not correct. freehwheels and cassettes have shaped and "ramped" teeth that help with shifting. These started about the same time indexing started. So the OP could certainly have a freewheel or cassette that is just straight teeth or an early version of shaped and ramped teeth and moving to newer, more evolved design can certainly improve shiffting
In 1994 8 speed would be a cassette. Not a chance Trek sold a bike with an 8 speed freewheel. Go take a look at a 1994 Trek catalog and see what bikes Trek offered with 8 speed and what 8 speed groups existed in 1994.

But since the OP’s bike doesn’t exist, we can pretend. Sure it’s an 8 speed Sachs Aris freewheel. It has gummed up shifters, probably brifters, or triggers. Or we can pretend they are 8 speed downtube shifters, bar ends, or thumbies.

It probably doesn’t matter since the OP might be tempted to spend $6000 on a new bike.

Should I buy a new tube for my bike or buy a new bike that already has a tube?

John

And a new wheel, all for $200.

Last edited by 70sSanO; 08-19-20 at 10:25 AM.
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Old 08-19-20, 10:42 AM
  #30  
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Several people have asked for the specific make and model of the bike. Is this just a hypothetical question, or are you asking about an actual bike that you own? If it's the latter, tell everyone what it is so they can respond knowledgeably. Otherwise you're just trolling.
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Old 08-19-20, 11:02 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by RideBike2020
He said the repair of $200 is really not worthy it, since I could not sell it for $200 after the repair.
Were you thinking about selling it in the near future? If not, the fact that it's not worth $200 doesn't really matter.
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Old 08-19-20, 11:30 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by headwind15
As A bicycle store owner/ mechanic for over 12 years, I find the term "a different rear sprocket to move the gears more correctly" disturbing. The mechanic is making up this terminology up. NEWSFLASH: there are no sprockets that will make your gears move more correctly. This is very similar to a car mechanic saying that your muffler bearings are shot! (in case you didn't know it, mufflers do not have bearings).
Originally Posted by squirtdad
not correct. freehwheels and cassettes have shaped and "ramped" teeth that help with shifting. These started about the same time indexing started. So the OP could certainly have a freewheel or cassette that is just straight teeth or an early version of shaped and ramped teeth and moving to newer, more evolved design can certainly improve shiffting
Originally Posted by 70sSanO
In 1994 8 speed would be a cassette. Not a chance Trek sold a bike with an 8 speed freewheel. Go take a look at a 1994 Trek catalog and see what bikes Trek offered with 8 speed and what 8 speed groups existed in 1994.

But since the OPís bike doesnít exist, we can pretend. Sure itís an 8 speed Sachs Aris freewheel. It has gummed up shifters, probably brifters, or triggers. Or we can pretend they are 8 speed downtube shifters, bar ends, or thumbies.

It probably doesnít matter since the OP might be tempted to spend $6000 on a new bike.

Should I buy a new tube for my bike or buy a new bike that already has a tube?

John

And a new wheel, all for $200.
not sure what you are going on about. I made a general statement noting that there is such a thing as a cassette or freewheel that makes shifting better (due to tooth designs, ramps, pins,etc) compared to those with straight teeth.

not sure how this got conflated to 8 speed sachs, etc. and agree 1984 was probably cassette....but wasn't talking about OP's bike

now back to OP

Is your bike rideable now? Assume no, so if you want a bike to ride it seems like the options are
  • Spend $200 with LBS and ride
  • Find a bike for $200 and ride......but will it be a better bike your bike will be with spending the $200?
  • Fix it up yourself for under $200
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Old 08-19-20, 11:48 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad
So the OP could certainly have a freewheel or cassette
This is why I brought up Sachs Aris, although I think IRD makes some 8 speed freewheels, and possibly others.

You were the one who said the OP could have an 8 speed freewheel.

It really doesnít matter.

John
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Old 08-19-20, 01:22 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by headwind15
As A bicycle store owner/ mechanic for over 12 years, I find the term "a different rear sprocket to move the gears more correctly" disturbing.
We hearing things 2nd-hand from someone who is obviously not a bike mechanic.

- Mark
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Old 08-19-20, 01:50 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO
In 1994 8 speed would be a cassette. Not a chance Trek sold a bike with an 8 speed freewheel. Go take a look at a 1994 Trek catalog and see what bikes Trek offered with 8 speed and what 8 speed groups existed in 1994..

They still sell bikes with freewheels.
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...colorCode=grey
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Old 08-19-20, 02:40 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by dedhed
They still sell bikes with freewheels.
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...colorCode=grey
Just about everyone sells lower end bikes with 7 speed freewheels. That isnít in question.

The OP stated 24 speed which is a 3x8. That would mean the freewheel would be 8 speed. I imagine there were a few mfgís that used 8 speed freewheels, but Iím pretty sure Trek wasnít one of them.

That is not an issue with the thread. The issue I have is an LBS quoting only $200 to replace a wheel, cassette, and brifters/triggers (gummed). I donít think a shop can do the components, labor and any incidental parts for that.

In 1994, not all Shimano groups were 8 speed, most road were, but only XT and XTR were.

As a 24 speed bike, it could be touring or mountain with a 3x8, but not necessarily limited to those. But probably not a hybrid.

So my issue is that it seems fishy.

John
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Old 08-19-20, 03:05 PM
  #37  
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12/2013 to present.
Still riding my '95 800 Sport daily.
Nearly every penny I put into it increased the value of "worthless" another fold....
I love the bike and will continue to do so into the rideable future!
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Old 08-19-20, 04:48 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by markjenn
the decision to buy tools and learn bike mechanics is independent from a decision to invest in an old bike.
It needn't be. With my first rebuild, I invested $100 in tools and about $1,000 in the bike. Everything I learned doing that helped with the following 60 or 70 I refurbished.

The cheapest way to own a bicycle is usually to buy a new one and take care of it.
For me, the cheapest way to own a great bike (or several of them) was to learn to do all the work myself. They're so much easier to "take care of" that way.
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Old 08-19-20, 10:07 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by RideBike2020
I have a Trex bicycle that I purchased around 1994. I always loved that bike. It has about 24 gears, if I recall correctly.
I local bicycle repair shop said he would have to put a new rear wheel on, which includes sprockets to make the gears move correctly, and I also wanted new gear shifters, since the old one's are sticky and deteriorated. He said the repair of $200 is really not worthy it, since I could not sell it for $200 after the repair. I appreciate his honestly.

Do you think it's worth it?
It depends on how and where you're going to ride the bike. If it's something you're looking to ride multi use bike paths, dirt and gravel roads, or just cruising around the neighborhood, $200 is totally worth it! I've worked in the bicycle industry as a mechanic for the last 38 years. The last several months, I pretty much do this exact repair multiple times daily. The biggest issue is getting parts at the moment.
Although these bikes are pretty simple to work on, a lot of shops and mechanics simply don't have a lot of experience on bikes that are pre 2000, so they don't like to work on them.I know that sounds strange, but it's true! Lots of other mechanics love working on this type project. Personally, I'd look more into that kind of shop.
Compared to a new bike, a nicer Trek Marlin or Roscoe, which is the modern day equivalent of your bike, are going to set you back $800-$1200. If you're looking for something to ride on more rugged off road trails, a new bike would be a better option, but the price just goes up from there.
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Old 08-20-20, 11:21 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by RideBike2020
I have a Trex bicycle that I purchased around 1994. I always loved that bike. It has about 24 gears, if I recall correctly.
I local bicycle repair shop said he would have to put a new rear wheel on, which includes sprockets to make the gears move correctly, and I also wanted new gear shifters, since the old one's are sticky and deteriorated. He said the repair of $200 is really not worthy it, since I could not sell it for $200 after the repair. I appreciate his honestly.

Do you think it's worth it?
Probably.

Compare the price to what you'd spend on a new in-stock bicycle of similar or better quality.

For any bicycle from a bike shop, you'd probably spend much more to replace it without COVID-19 depleting inventory.

When I broke a discontinued spring in my Campagnolo 9 speed rear lever, it cost me $700 for mostly New Old Stock components to upgrade to 10 or 11 cogs not $4,500 for a new bicycle.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 08-23-20 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 08-22-20, 12:30 PM
  #41  
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I'd save up some cash for a new bike and donate the old one (or sell it maybe). Even "special" bikes that we are nostalgic about we quickly forget once we have a new, better, lighter model. And new bikes are better and lighter.
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Old 08-22-20, 06:26 PM
  #42  
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You love the frame and fork, why not do it? Last year I put Campy 11 speed on my good ol' steel steed. Yep, could have purchased a new bike with Shimano tiagra and fancy frame, but that ol' frame and fork fit me so perfectly it wasn't even considered. The upgrade of drive train and wheels turned the bike into a modern machine and I love it all the more!

JUST DO IT
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Old 08-23-20, 08:44 AM
  #43  
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I have an old Miele Uno LS frameset that I really like. I like it so much that I took it to a custom frame/bike builder and had braze-ons for cantilever brakes, brake brake housing stop, rear rack mounts on the seatstays, and a third pair of bottle mounts (under the downtube) added to the bike for only $65.00 Canadian including the parts. Then I put on some other components I had. The cost would have been in the $200.00 or so range BUT... I now have a road touring bike that fits me perfectly. I consider it money well spent.

This is the result.




Cheers
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