Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Next tool acquisition - torque wrench

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Next tool acquisition - torque wrench

Old 08-20-20, 06:52 PM
  #1  
TheCharm 
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Alexandria VA
Posts: 65

Bikes: 2015 Surly Disc Trucker & 2011 Trek 7.3fx

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 11 Posts
Next tool acquisition - torque wrench

Hi all:

I posted earlier this week that this pandemic has convinced me I need to become a more competent mechanic. When I had a car, I could do basic things like oil changes, spark plug changes, tire rotations and some exhaust work (that didn't include welding). So while I'm certainly not bold enough to call myself anything approaching competent, I am fairly comfortable with tools. Generally, I need to do/see things once or twice and then I have a familiarity to be self-sufficient. Anyway, I appreciate you all's patience with a bike wrench noob. I know I'll have more questions moving forward. I've used the search feature, but some things may have been addressed long ago and could benefit from a fresh discussion. I use Sheldon's site and Zinn's book for reference material.

So. Torque wrenches. First off, I have a Craftsman that is fairly husky - it goes from around 40 N m through nearly 400 N m. I used it for various tasks on my car when I had one, notably torquing lug nuts. As far as my bike goes, I use it for the cassette locking ring -- it's a 1/4" drive and I have a shimano lock ring remover that fits, and I think the scale of this will be suitable for BB work when I get to that. But I *think* that'll be about it for this torque wrench as far as a bike goes. I need something for the lesser amounts.

I know lots of folks get those pre-set torque tools that Park and Pedros offer, but I think I'd like to avoid those and instead get a smaller wrench that covers all of the remaining range I'm likely to need.

Both Pedros and Park have offerings. From Park, for example, I could get the TW-5.2 ratchet and the SBS-1.2 socket and bit set. In total, I'd spend around US $160. Neither one of these items are available from Park just now. I haven't looked elsewhere, but I assume would be similar.

Pedros has the Demi Torque and an 18-piece bit set which would set me back around US $155 for the two - substantially the same as the Park option. I assume these are both in stock as the website doesn't say otherwise.

Finally, I'm a big fan of Wera tools and they have a torque and bit (16 pcs) set all in one nice package (https://products.wera.de/en/torque_t..._torque_1.html). The site doesn't list a price but Wera commands a premium. I don't mind spending money on good tools that will last a lifetime. But I can't seem to find this set anywhere. Amazon lists it, but does't have a price and it doesn't seem like it's available there.

I'm also considering getting a Wera stand-alone torque wrench and getting the smallest bit set that includes what I need and add as I might need to (for other repairs I might encounter outside of my bike). As far as what I need that requires being torqued properly, I think would need 4,5,6,8mm hex and T-25. Does that about cover it?

So how would you all approach this? What do you keep in your toolbox for torque? I have talked to plenty of LBS mechanics who state they never torque, they just make it "good-n-tight". I can appreciate that, but I'm not looking to be talked out of this. I'm the kind of maniac that if a torque setting is indicated, I. WILL. USE. IT.

Final question, I swear: the rotors I currently have call for 6.2 N m of torque. I don't think the wrenches I've seen have a graduated scale that allows for that precision - they're usually a bit more "coarse" in their adjustments. It's going to drive me crazy if I can't dial that in directly - so would I torque to 6 or 7 N m??

Thanks for your consideration.
TheCharm is offline  
Old 08-20-20, 07:11 PM
  #2  
RowdyTI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Sometimes people relying fully on the torque wrench strip bolts. That could happen if you're working with a generous application of anti-seize and the torque specification is for dry fastening. Anti-seize can increase clamping force for a given torque rating by up to 50%, and more commonly about 30%.

Also to avoid cluttering the board elsewhere, can thread watchers tell me why some thru axles like the HardLite say torque of 8-10 NM and others say 9-13.5 NM like the Maxle Stealth? How do they figure out these torque ratings since the material of these axles is the same aluminum and they seem perfectly equivalent except coming out of different factories with different names on them.

Last edited by RowdyTI; 08-21-20 at 12:26 PM.
RowdyTI is offline  
Likes For RowdyTI:
Old 08-20-20, 07:19 PM
  #3  
TheCharm 
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Alexandria VA
Posts: 65

Bikes: 2015 Surly Disc Trucker & 2011 Trek 7.3fx

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by RowdyTI View Post
I am getting myself a CDI TorqControl TLA28NM. It goes from 2 to 8 NM. I prefer it because it has the form of a mini tool so over time you can get a feel for various torque levels, and it doesn't have too much leverage like a usual torque tool so you're not 100% relying on the tool. A tool like this gives you a better feel for what's actually going on. Sometimes people relying fully on the torque wrench strip bolts. That could happen if you're working with a generous application of anti-seize and the torque specification is for dry fastening. Anti-seize can increase clamping force for a given torque rating by up to 50%, and more commonly about 30%.
Oh, that's a very nice option and a great price point! I don't think I'd need any greater than 8 N m for my bike; I'd have to double-check. Do you already have a bit set you'd be using with it, or are you eyeing up an acquisition there too?

Thanks for suggesting a low-cost alternative!

Edit: I see on a google search I did, it comes with some bits.
TheCharm is offline  
Likes For TheCharm:
Old 08-20-20, 07:28 PM
  #4  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,336 Times in 844 Posts
I'd* go expensive on the 1/4" drive, beam on the 3/8" , probably wont need the 1/2" drive for bicycles.

*though after 40 years, a good sensitivity to 'how tight , is right' is developed..

but to tell someone else 'how tight?' that's where the standardized numbers come in..






...

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-20-20 at 07:33 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Likes For fietsbob:
Old 08-20-20, 07:28 PM
  #5  
fooferdoggie 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 1,698
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 475 Post(s)
Liked 595 Times in 355 Posts
this guy works well and its s not too bulky. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...0?ie=UTF8&th=1
fooferdoggie is offline  
Likes For fooferdoggie:
Old 08-20-20, 07:51 PM
  #6  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 2,061

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 495 Post(s)
Liked 275 Times in 209 Posts
My favorite I've used is the Effetto Giustaforza II torque wrench, which is 2-16 nm. This is my personal wrench which I use a lot. Goes around $170 for a wrench with bits: https://www.probikekit.com/bicycle-t...=TOP10_220518_. My favorite high end wrench that covers like all the values you're likely to need is the Topeak D-TORQ WRENCH DX but it is hella expensive. I have a cheap Park beam-style wrench in addition to my Mariposa for the uncommon times that I feel I need precise torque for high values. I do wish I had something that was more acurate/precise up to about 30nm for some suspension bolts.

I've used the Park wrenches in a commercial setting a lot, they're fine but not my favorite. Pedros looks similar, but I haven't used it.

Also I'm a professional mechanic; don't trust anyone who doesn't use a torque wrench with regularity. Real mechanics use real tools. If I'm being honest, there are a number of fasteners which are relatively insensitive to torque value and I do not use a torque wrench on absolutely every one of them, but you can bet your ass I'm using a torque wrench for any kind of pinch bolt over carbon (or really other materials except for maybe steel steer tubes), any suspension bolt, and anytime I have any doubt. With efficient work practices you do not save any time and money refusing to use torque wrenches when appropriate.
cpach is offline  
Old 08-20-20, 07:58 PM
  #7  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
Liked 438 Times in 290 Posts
So how often do you guys calibrate your torque wrenches?

That is one of the advantages of the beam type wrenches, they tend to maintain their calibration.
Pop N Wood is offline  
Old 08-20-20, 08:18 PM
  #8  
aggiegrads
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sherwood, OR
Posts: 1,253
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 320 Post(s)
Liked 280 Times in 165 Posts
The vast majority of fasteners will fall below 10Nm with a couple of notable exceptions. The main exception is pedals and crank bolts. Square taper and some splined cranks take about 40Nm, and Shimano pinch bolts take about 12Nm,

My nice torque wrench is a 2-10Nm, a less expensive mid range, and a nicer SK 40-200Nm that I originally bought for automotive use.

if I had to live without one of those, it would be the big one. The “good and tight” standard works for pedals and cranks, and the problem with those is usually undertorquing.

fietsbob gives good advice to spend more at the bottom end of torque ranges. If you like Wera, they make the Syntace torque wrench, or at least they did, and I believe that they still do. EDIT: I checked the Syntace website and they clearly state that their wrench is built by Wera.

KCTool is the US distributor for Wera, and the bicycle tool kit is here: https://www.kctoolco.com/wera-004180...rque-1-16-pcs/ Even on sale is is over $300. There are better options for the price in my opinion. I love my Wera screwdrivers and the mini-bit ratchet is one of my favorite tools, so you can’t go wrong if you don’t mind spending the money.

There are two camps here when it comes to tools. The first is the “a skilled mechanic can make do with a screwdriver and a rock, you don’t need [tool you are considering here]. I fall in the second camp which despises low quality tools, believes that good tools will last forever, and prefers to use a purpose-built tool whenever possible.

Last edited by aggiegrads; 08-20-20 at 08:38 PM.
aggiegrads is offline  
Old 08-20-20, 09:02 PM
  #9  
RowdyTI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
How about this one? https://www.kctoolco.com/wera-074705...p-screwdriver/

Wera 7443 4.0 - 8.8 Nm Adjustable Torque Pistol Grip Screwdriver


That should do most of your needs and looks like a good tool.

Regarding calibration, I read:
You don't need an expensive torque wrench. +/-5% accuracy is plenty good enough for bicycle use.
You're going to get more variation than that depending on what you use on the threads and how much.

Also read:
IMO a torque wrench isn't necessary, but it may help someone who is hamfisted and lacks touch. It's pretty easy to feel when fasteners are properly tightened as the torque will begin to ramp up steeply as you approach max tightness.

I also subscribe to the notion of functional tightness, or the idea that clamps should be tight enough to do the job, and any more is just added stress on the parts. So for example, I tighten seatposts so they don't slide or allow the post to twist under normal conditions (plus a margin for error). That may, and should require less torque than what the hardware can take, and can easily enough be gauged by experience, or a simple twist test.

OTOH - I've seen far too many cases where blind reliance on a torque wrench has gotten folks into trouble for a number of reasons. So even if you opt to buy and use a torque wrench, you still need to retain a sense of what you're doing.
What reasons could those be that people get into trouble using torque wrenches?

I tend to think a good mechanic should be able to feel what's appropriate. In another thread I called the bikes most of us ride precision instruments, and someone begged to differ on that point. I'm also not convinced there's any rocket science when bike mfg's come up with their recommended torque figures. For example, the HardLite thru axle says 8 to 10 and the Maxle Stealth says 9 to 13.5 NM. As far as I can tell, they're identical hardware except for minor cosmetic differences.

Check out this thread: Is it important to get a torque wench?

Last edited by RowdyTI; 08-20-20 at 09:09 PM.
RowdyTI is offline  
Likes For RowdyTI:
Old 08-20-20, 09:08 PM
  #10  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,238

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2995 Post(s)
Liked 2,220 Times in 1,467 Posts
I would vote for Wera. I do like their stuff. If I could swing it I would go with the Snap-On digital torque wrench, that one is super duper nice and satisfying in the hand especially the larger one for big torque jobs. I am currently using the Effetto Mariposa Guistaforza II Anniversary torque wrench and it is nice but I don't like the super long bits. I may end up either going for the Topeak Digital or the Wera wrench at some point but currently my EM is just fine.

Don't have time for cheap amazon tools and honestly the guessing (because my hands are calibrated) can be off by a lot sometimes. Granted yes I use my "calibrated" hands frequently on certain things but I much prefer the torque wrench when possible. Better to be safe than sorry and especially with carbon components and modern lighter and lighter weight stuff it is good to be safe and secure.

We were installing a car hitch and it needed a lot of torque for a bolt and we cranked on it hard and it was still off by 50nm or so. It was quite ridiculous.
veganbikes is offline  
Likes For veganbikes:
Old 08-20-20, 09:37 PM
  #11  
2_i 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,455

Bikes: Trek 730 (quad), 720 & 830, Bike Friday NWT, Brompton M27R & M6R, Dahon HAT060 & HT060, ...

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 723 Post(s)
Liked 266 Times in 199 Posts
Forget the advice so far and get a modestly priced digital torque adapter, such as Performance Tool M206. I combine it with different adapters to get a reading on any torque I apply that is suspect for one reason or another. You change units or mode of operation by pressing a button. Yes people give advice in good faith but they were gaining their torque wrench experience in another epoch.
2_i is offline  
Old 08-20-20, 11:59 PM
  #12  
Ryan_M
Full Member
 
Ryan_M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Courtice, Ont.
Posts: 218

Bikes: 2020 Giant Roam 1... at least it was

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 74 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by fooferdoggie View Post
this guy works well and its s not too bulky. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...0?ie=UTF8&th=1
I have this same kit and highly recommend it! Not super high end but it comes with a calibration certificate so it has to be somewhat accurate, certainly accurate enough. I'm also not a fan of buying a kit that includes bits but this has everything I need besides the specialty bike tools.
Ryan_M is offline  
Likes For Ryan_M:
Old 08-21-20, 03:39 AM
  #13  
TheCharm 
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Alexandria VA
Posts: 65

Bikes: 2015 Surly Disc Trucker & 2011 Trek 7.3fx

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by cpach View Post

Also I'm a professional mechanic; don't trust anyone who doesn't use a torque wrench with regularity. Real mechanics use real tools.
I know - this does concern me. Often times, the answer me with a slight smirk on their face as if to suggest "torque wrenches are for rookies". I actually don't think it's cool as I'm of the opinion that if there is a torque setting printed on the part or in the documentation it's there for a reason and best be used!
TheCharm is offline  
Likes For TheCharm:
Old 08-21-20, 03:52 AM
  #14  
TheCharm 
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Alexandria VA
Posts: 65

Bikes: 2015 Surly Disc Trucker & 2011 Trek 7.3fx

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 11 Posts
Great comments! Thanks all - I hope to make a decision as to what direction I want to go soon.
TheCharm is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 05:08 AM
  #15  
grizzly59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 712
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 283 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 164 Posts
I would buy a 1/4" beam torque wrench for working on bikes. Accurate and hold their calibration, inexpensive as well. I use a 3/8 beam as well as clicks on cars, and it also comes in handy to check the calibration of the other click torque wrenches.

Something like this

https://www.amazon.com/Titan-23140-N...%2C178&sr=8-13
grizzly59 is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 05:49 AM
  #16  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
Liked 438 Times in 290 Posts
Originally Posted by RowdyTI View Post
Regarding calibration, I read:
You don't need an expensive torque wrench. +/-5% accuracy is plenty good enough for bicycle use.
You're going to get more variation than that depending on what you use on the threads and how much.
You're confusing calibration with accuracy. Calibration removes the inaccuracies that creep in over time. The 5% listed accuracy is only guaranteed if the unit is properly calibrated on a periodic basis. Most manufactures recommend yearly calibration schedules. Click type torque wrenches drift more readily and require more frequent calibration schedules than the more simple beam type units.

If you aren't calibrating your tools than how do you know whether the torque you are applying is any more accurate than the mechanic doing it by feel?

Also realize that most torque specs are listed based upon dry untreated threads. There are some exceptions. If you lube the fasteners than the torque setting needs to be adjusted.
Pop N Wood is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 06:16 AM
  #17  
Dancing Skeleton
Full Member
 
Dancing Skeleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 31 Posts
There are many different sellers with this one sold under different names.
I've had it for years and it works great, and it can usually be bought for ~$50.
The only two things that I need it for that are out of its range are cassettes at 40Nm, & my crank at ~50Nm.
For those two I've got a 35 year old 1/2 drive click-type wrench.
Dancing Skeleton is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 06:34 AM
  #18  
Moe Zhoost
Half way there
 
Moe Zhoost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,698

Bikes: Many, and the list changes frequently

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Liked 701 Times in 424 Posts
Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
Forget the advice so far and get a modestly priced digital torque adapter, such as Performance Tool M206. I combine it with different adapters to get a reading on any torque I apply that is suspect for one reason or another. You change units or mode of operation by pressing a button. Yes people give advice in good faith but they were gaining their torque wrench experience in another epoch.
I've considered one of these. I do have 2 torque wrenches already so I would think that this digital gauge could also be used to calibrate them. I realize that they are not a primary standard so it would probably be a good idea to check them as well, but I would assume that digital gauges are less sensitive to change than analog spring tension wrenches.

Anyone have any experience?
Moe Zhoost is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 07:55 AM
  #19  
2_i 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,455

Bikes: Trek 730 (quad), 720 & 830, Bike Friday NWT, Brompton M27R & M6R, Dahon HAT060 & HT060, ...

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 723 Post(s)
Liked 266 Times in 199 Posts
Originally Posted by Moe Zhoost View Post
I've considered one of these. I do have 2 torque wrenches already so I would think that this digital gauge could also be used to calibrate them. I realize that they are not a primary standard so it would probably be a good idea to check them as well, but I would assume that digital gauges are less sensitive to change than analog spring tension wrenches.

Anyone have any experience?
I also have an old style one but hardly use it anymore as the digital device is so much more convenient. I would compare this to the case of an electronic calculator vs mechanical slide rule. The only issue is that an adapter will not fit into tight spaces. However, this is more of an issue around an engine than bicycle. The best is a digital stand-alone tool but their current prices are beyond what can be justified for home use. I suspect that over time the digital wrenches will dominate the market just as digital calipers.
2_i is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 10:01 AM
  #20  
RowdyTI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
You're confusing calibration with accuracy. Calibration removes the inaccuracies that creep in over time. The 5% listed accuracy is only guaranteed if the unit is properly calibrated on a periodic basis. Most manufactures recommend yearly calibration schedules. Click type torque wrenches drift more readily and require more frequent calibration schedules than the more simple beam type units.
Well, I was thinking accurate calibration probably isn't important for bike work. The low torque wrenches would stay calibrated much longer than the higher torque ones, and even after 5 years I doubt the lack of calibration an issue for bike work. That said, how do you calibrate yours and what do you recommend? Also interested in thoughts from others.

Regarding working by feel, again, it's much easier to go by feel when working with low torque bolts up to 12 NM.
RowdyTI is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 10:39 AM
  #21  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,163

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
Liked 438 Times in 290 Posts
We have a calibration lab at work. Every tool has a calibration date that needs to be checked before use. Use to work in a nuc plant and those guys were fanatical about calibrated tools.

For home use I have beam type wrenches I use on my cars and very rarely on a bike. Can't say I've ever had them calibrated. But I'm the type who doesn't worry much about torque specs on bikes.

By saying an accurate calibration isn't necessary for bike work you are essentially saying the same thing that I am.
Pop N Wood is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 01:30 PM
  #22  
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Posts: 8,234

Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 57 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I'd* go expensive on the 1/4" drive, beam on the 3/8" , probably wont need the 1/2" drive for bicycles.

*though after 40 years, a good sensitivity to 'how tight , is right' is developed..

but to tell someone else 'how tight?' that's where the standardized numbers come in..







...
Snug it down, and then just a little bit more! lol
Wanderer is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 06:24 PM
  #23  
DeadGrandpa
Philosopher of Bicycling
 
DeadGrandpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Carolina
Posts: 1,120

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 460 Post(s)
Liked 249 Times in 166 Posts
https://www.amazon.com/Venzo-2-10NM-.../dp/B00V4CQEGW

^^^^ This is what I use for stems, seat posts, stuff like that.
DeadGrandpa is offline  
Old 08-21-20, 09:15 PM
  #24  
RowdyTI
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by DeadGrandpa View Post
https://www.amazon.com/Venzo-2-10NM-.../dp/B00V4CQEGW

^^^^ This is what I use for stems, seat posts, stuff like that.
For a bit more money, wouldn't it be better investing in this?
https://www.amazon.com/Bicycle-Torqu...ct_top?ie=UTF8

Every single one of the written reviews is highly positive, and it's not much money.
RowdyTI is offline  
Old 08-22-20, 09:54 AM
  #25  
quindecima
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Oregon
Posts: 71

Bikes: Flex, Volkscycle MarkX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 5 Posts
Go on Epay and get a Snap-on in Inch lbs. They are pretty cheap there make sure it is calibrated.
quindecima is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.