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Pedal Re-build Question

Old 09-21-20, 05:47 PM
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WaffleHouse
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Pedal Re-build Question

The Wellgo M141A pedal on my 2013 Trek started making a clicking noise the other day.

Naturally without doing any research, I removed the pedal and immediately the dust seal on the inside of the pedal closest to the crank arm broke (more like crumbled) in half. I continued with the disassembly and removed the spindle only to find a fair amount of grit inside the bearing race. After cleaning the bearing race out, I noticed there was no scoring or surface damage...the races passed visual inspection.

Now that I can reassemble the pedal...does anybody have any tips on where to find bearing "seals"?

I know most people are going to say "Just toss 'em and buy a new pair", but I like these pedals....they're anodized aluminum and match the bike really well.

Thanks
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Old 09-21-20, 06:18 PM
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the pedals I've ever dealt with [that could be "serviced"] ended up in the trash.

The bearing assembly tends to cost enough to not make sense in committing to the service. The seals were never found a la carte when needed. Cheaper to buy new & move forward. Buy a few pairs next time you order your favorite "ones". Personally, I like to try out different designs of pedals.
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Old 09-21-20, 06:46 PM
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Agree with Troul but for the trying different pedals part. get a spare or three. And do the rebuild far sooner on the replacement pair next time. Andy
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Old 09-21-20, 07:38 PM
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If you really want to keep these pedals, just put 'em back together with as much thick grease as you can stuff into them. They'll last a while.
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Old 09-21-20, 08:28 PM
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It's amazing these original pedals lasted that far, with or without service. Would a plumbing O ring do? Or is the broken piece part of a bushing? If not just put them back together and try them.
I have V Sixty platform pedals that went 30,000 miles with once or twice yearly lubing. One side sealed bearing. They don't even have a separate O ring.
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Old 09-22-20, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by GamblerGORD53 View Post
It's amazing these original pedals lasted that far, with or without service. Would a plumbing O ring do? Or is the broken piece part of a bushing? If not just put them back together and try them.
I have V Sixty platform pedals that went 30,000 miles with once or twice yearly lubing. One side sealed bearing. They don't even have a separate O ring.
To be honest, I would be shocked if the bike has 1,500 total miles on it in total (may be helping contribute to the perceived "longevity"). That and I am definitely a fair weather biker...I don't ride in the rain. Just dry, crushed limestone rail-trails. I like your idea, Gambler. I'm going to head over to the local ACE after work today and see what they have in the way of plumbing O-rings. I'm guessing it wouldn't hurt any more than running them without a seal as Koyote mentioned.
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Old 09-22-20, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by GamblerGORD53 View Post
Would a plumbing O ring do? Or is the broken piece part of a bushing?
An O-ring might work as a seal replacement. Some older pedals from e.g. Zeus and Campagnolo used O-ring seals on pedals, but the axle had a groove to hold the ring in place. Without such retention, the ring might not stay in place well. But O-rings are cheap enough that it ought to be worth a try.
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Old 09-22-20, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by GamblerGORD53 View Post
Would a plumbing O ring do?
Yes, worth a try. OP just has to make sure it's the correct type of rubber which, I think, most plumbing o-rings sold at hardware stores are. Nitrile (Buna N) is what is most common and works well. Stay away from EPDM though as it's not made for petroleum greases and is used in some plumbing applications. Chart here. https://www.applerubber.com/products/o-rings/
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Old 09-22-20, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
Yes, worth a try. OP just has to make sure it's the correct type of rubber which, I think, most plumbing o-rings sold at hardware stores are. Nitrile (Buna N) is what is most common and works well. Stay away from EPDM though as it's not made for petroleum greases and is used in some plumbing applications. Chart here. https://www.applerubber.com/products/o-rings/
Great point and noted, Cranky!
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