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I used to be a good bike mechanic ...

Old 11-24-20, 03:51 AM
  #26  
Amt0571
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
I have wondered since I used to work on airplanes why working on bikes is more difficult. It's because even the good bike stuff has horribly cheap fasteners.
I have not worked in planes, but I agree with you regarding the bikes.

I only use a torque wrench on carbon parts and seatpost clamps though, and I've never stripped anything.
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Old 11-24-20, 06:57 AM
  #27  
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Let me be clear, I have have stripped a few bolts through the years, just not on a bicycle.

As far as plumbing goes - I found it rare that any job will require replacing only one part.
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Old 11-24-20, 10:26 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
plumbers yoga just plan hurts after a certain age
I bought a plumbing book, after my first home purchase, to tackle a leak under the sink. The directions started with (roughly):
Take every single thing out from under the sink.
Build up a platform of pillow or padding, to lie on, that matches the level of cabinet opening.
Get a good light that fits into the cabinet, ideally that you can move around.
Put down old towels to catch the various leaks and drips.
It's tempting to skip these steps, but don't. You're going to be under there a while...
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Old 11-24-20, 10:52 AM
  #29  
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Torque wrenches are absolutely needed in some place. I worked on one model of printer that needed the hammers screwed down to 11 inch pounds. If you didnt use a torque wrench, you could ruin the whole $3000 assy.

The upshot is--------------------work on any machine including a bike the right way.

Last edited by rydabent; 11-24-20 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 11-24-20, 11:08 AM
  #30  
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From another thread but looks like a promising product. Might be worth a try in your application

Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Not sure if this has been mentioned:

https://www.mcmaster.com/stripped-thread-repair-kits

Maybe not adequate for structural fasteners but should work for a small screw holding a cable in place. I used to use a Loctite product we called Form-a-thread but I don't know if this is the correct name for it. It may very well be the product listed at McMaster Carr but they strip most brand names off their catalogue listings.
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Old 11-24-20, 11:14 AM
  #31  
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A good mechanic never always blames his tools.
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Old 11-24-20, 03:36 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by tgot View Post
I bought a plumbing book, after my first home purchase, to tackle a leak under the sink. The directions started with (roughly):
Take every single thing out from under the sink.
Build up a platform of pillow or padding, to lie on, that matches the level of cabinet opening.
Get a good light that fits into the cabinet, ideally that you can move around.
Put down old towels to catch the various leaks and drips.
It's tempting to skip these steps, but don't. You're going to be under there a while...
But, but, but... this was supposed to be easy. They never mention that the faucet will be behind the basin and you won't be able to reach anything, that the old faucet's clamp won't move after being in place for 20 years, that the drain will never align with what you have, that the flex hose will either be too short or too long, that you'll never be able to get the lever into the stopper hole, that your shutoff valves leak, that the drain is clogged, that the flex hose nuts were metric (neither 7/8 nor 15/16). All of this and all I wanted to do is replace one faucet set with another.

I'll take bike wrenching anyday.
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Old 11-24-20, 03:52 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
A good mechanic never always blames his tools.
Yep, watch tennis players always break the racket.
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Old 11-24-20, 05:06 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
A good mechanic never always blames his tools.
My grandpa (he would be about 125 now) used to say "a bad worker always blames his tools".
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Old 11-24-20, 06:25 PM
  #35  
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Strip 1 screw after all these years being a bike mechanic. I'm sorry to tell you but your has been ,washed up and has been, hang up the wrenches , heck hang up the cleats on your old bike shoes, hang up the sew- up tires. Hang up the chamois pants, hang up the wool jersey, hang up the down tube shifters, hang up the , I can't thing of any more 😎😁
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Old 11-24-20, 08:16 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by zacster View Post
But, but, but... this was supposed to be easy. (snipped)

I'll take bike wrenching anyday.
You didn't have to pull out the 2 3/4" plumbing wrench with a handle less than 4" to fit into the corner?

Agreed, plumbing is uphill AND upwind, both ways.
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Old 11-25-20, 01:13 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
With all due respect to those manufacturers involved, I have found over the past several decades a trend that Chinese-made items are likely to have inaccurately drilled and poorly threaded holes, and nuts and bolts of soft materials, also inaccurately made and threaded. That combination of fastenings often results in poor fit, stripped bolt heads, or stripped threads. It is what it is. We make our choices, pay our money, and live with what we get.
To be fair - Chinese can make high quality stuff and sell it at roughly half the price of those made in USA/EU.
However, at least that's my impression, when "brand name" manufacturers outsource production to China, they probably pay about 1/10 of what they charge. And you can't get 10 times more than you pay for.
Chinese have the tools, the knowledge, and the skilled workers. But, while they do "work for cheap", they can't work for free.

As for the OP - it happens. Mounting paste and a torque wrench are a safe bet.
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Old 11-25-20, 09:36 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Bike Gremlin View Post
To be fair - Chinese can make high quality stuff and sell it at roughly half the price of those made in USA/EU.
However, at least that's my impression, when "brand name" manufacturers outsource production to China, they probably pay about 1/10 of what they charge. And you can't get 10 times more than you pay for.
Chinese have the tools, the knowledge, and the skilled workers. But, while they do "work for cheap", they can't work for free.

As for the OP - it happens. Mounting paste and a torque wrench are a safe bet.
Re: mounting paste - never used it - does it work on painted surfaces?
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Old 11-25-20, 10:57 AM
  #39  
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I used to be good at a lot of things...

Auto mechanic, carpenter, landscaper, computer programmer, etc. etc.

I still do all those things (except programming), but not as well, or at least not as quickly. It's frustrating, but part of aging. Two factors that diminish my skills are reduced visual acuity and muscle cramps. I hate wearing glasses, so I only put on reading glasses for up close work or reading. I used to think nothing about sliding under a car or twisting myself into a tight spot for carpentry repairs or whatnot. Now there's a good chance my legs will cramp, upper or lower.

As for cycling, I never had the racing mentality or muscles, but still do fine and enjoy recreational/ fitness cycling. 2,300 miles this year in hilly terrain. Am finding I enjoy my gravel bike more now than road bike. I tend to focus more on keeping up a good pace on the road bike, but enjoy taking my time on lesser traveled gravel and paved roads with the gravel bike. I stop and "smell the roses" more on the gravel bike, and it is easier on the old body as well with wider tires at lower pressures.

As you age, you do less but enjoy it more if you're lucky enough to be in good physical and financial shape. Don't beat yourself up as your skills diminish. Just plan to go slower and do what you can. As a cyclist, you're likely an expert at pacing yourself; a skill that can be broadly applied if you're not under too many demands from work, family, etc.
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Old 11-25-20, 12:35 PM
  #40  
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Hear, hear! I’m thinking that’s why earlier generations of retiring trade technicians took on apprentices...so they could kick back a bit and complain when the kid stripped the nut instead of them?
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Old 11-26-20, 12:30 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Oakman View Post
Re: mounting paste - never used it - does it work on painted surfaces?
Painted surfaces? Not sure if we are thinking of the same thing. If it's a joke, I've missed it, not a native speaker - so I'll explain, just in case:
Mounting, or anti-seize paste - whatever people call it. It's worked well for me at least. Both for easier assembly, and, more importantly (since grease does the job for the assembly as well), for preventing the bolts and nuts from getting stuck after a few winters of riding.
But I never used it on something I'd call a painted surface. Using it on bolt threads, and bolt "face" (top, flat part that presses against the material being held in place by the bolt).
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Old 11-26-20, 06:26 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Bike Gremlin View Post
Painted surfaces? Not sure if we are thinking of the same thing. If it's a joke, I've missed it, not a native speaker - so I'll explain, just in case:
Mounting, or anti-seize paste - whatever people call it. It's worked well for me at least. Both for easier assembly, and, more importantly (since grease does the job for the assembly as well), for preventing the bolts and nuts from getting stuck after a few winters of riding.
But I never used it on something I'd call a painted surface. Using it on bolt threads, and bolt "face" (top, flat part that presses against the material being held in place by the bolt).
Okay, got it. I have used anti-seize many times. Thought you may be talking about some kind of friction paste used to keep parts from slipping, i.e. carbon seatposts. Or maybe tire mounting paste? Anyway, I mentioned painted surfaces because I have had issues with torque when shimming a front derailleur on to a smaller diameter seat tube (ended up using double face tape).
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