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What specific bike tools do you own?

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What specific bike tools do you own?

Old 12-07-20, 04:57 PM
  #1  
rajbcpa
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What specific bike tools do you own?

I have been acquiring several bikes recently and discovered that specific bike tools are needed to work on bikes.

So far, I have acquired these recently:
1. bottom bracket sockets
2. small metric open end box end wrenches
3. bottom bracket stamped steel wrenches
4. cable stretcher/cutter
5. bike stands
6. derailuar alignment tool
7. allen wrenches - mostly metric
8. truing wheel
9. chain tool

What specific bike tools do you own? My thinking was to acquire enough tools so that I could work on (learn) just about anything.

I talk with my local bike shop owner often but my primary instruction on heavy wrenching comes from YouTube.

Your thoughts, please.

thanks,
Rob Bartsch
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Old 12-07-20, 05:06 PM
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The special bike tools:

Headset press
Assorted Park cone wrenches
Park chain tool
Park cassette tools
Chain Whip
3rd hand and 4th hand tools
Shimano e-tube cable tool
A bunch of different headset tools.
Pedal wrench
Truing stand
Peanut Butter tool (for crank bolts)
Park cable and housing cutters
Star nut setter
Digital torque wrench
Digital air pressure gauge
Shock pump
Bleed kit
Tubeless tire tools
Presta valve stem removal tool
BSA b-bracket tool.
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Old 12-07-20, 05:22 PM
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You can easily end up buying a lot of tools you'll never use.
Get some "basic" tools such as a set of good cone wrenches, cable cutter/crimper, metric hex keys and wrenches.....
Expand as you need such as cassette/FW, BB & crank removers, chain whip(s)
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Old 12-07-20, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
You can easily end up buying a lot of tools you'll never use.
Get some "basic" tools such as a set of good cone wrenches
Cartridge bearing hubs usually don't use them.

metric hex keys and wrenches.....
Many bikes only use a wrench for brake centering and that may take a bike specific offset model.

Conversely, Torx fasteners are becoming increasingly common for chain rings and stems.

Buying things as you need them is fine advice.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 12-07-20 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 12-07-20, 06:15 PM
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Cone wrenches, some homemade (Sturmey Archer and Bendix hubs)
Spoke wrench
Spoke wrench that works
Truing stand, homemade
Various spline tools (bb, freewheel, etc.) over the years
Chain tool
Tire levers
Pedal wrench
Old fashioned bottom bracket tool
Repair stand, a birthday gift from my spouse

All of these were purchased as needed over the span of 30+ years. I don't buy any specialized tool until I need it. If I have to wait, I ride another bike.
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Old 12-07-20, 08:45 PM
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Everyone is being a bit more generalized I went a bit more specific only because I have already been building this list prior to this post

This is my current toolbox list. I could be missing a couple things from my box on this list and it is in no particular order:

Park Tool BX-3 Rolling Big Blue Box

Wera Hex-Plus Multicolour Stainless L-key set

Silca Hex Wrenches Enve set

Wera Multicolour HF 1 Torx L-key set with holding function

Snap-On T25 hard handle screwdriver

Abbey Decade chain tool

Park Tool DSD-2 and DSD-4

Soma Y-Ratchet

Cone Wrenches: vintage Sugino and Kingsbridge (13-14/15-16)

Hozan Ratcheting hub nut wrench

EAI Pro Keirin Tool

Park Tool cassette lockring tool with handle

Pedro’s Equalizer Pedal Wrench

Park Tool HCW-7 headset Wrench

Shimano Dura-Ace EX Headset Wrench

Wheels Mfg Double End BB Wrench, 48.5mm / 44mm

Birzman Specialist B.B. wrench (Hollowtech II)

Park Tool Cassette pliers

Shimano TL-SR22 1/8" Chain Whip and Lockring Tool

Park Tool FR 1.3 freewheel remover (shimano style)

Park Tool FR-6 freewheel remover (4 notch BMX style)

Park Tool SW 20.2 master spoke wrench SW

Park Tool ATD-1 Adjustable Torque Driver

Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza 2-16 Pro Anniversary – Torque Wrench

Park Tool CCP-22 and CCP-44 Crank Pullers

Park Tool BBT-22 bottom bracket tool

Phil Wood Portable Square Taper Bottom Bracket tools

Park Tool CC-3 chain checker

Crank Brothers Speedier Tire Levers

Jagwire Pro Housing Cutter

Snap On 7-14 12-Point Metric Flank Drive® Short Ratcheting Combination Wrench (on order)

Snap on 1/4" Drive Dual 80® Technology Soft Grip Round Swivel Head Ratchet

Wera 1/4 Zyklop Sockets 4-13 (need to order)

Park Tool BKM-1 Hydraulic Brake Bleed Kit — Mineral

Park Tool DT-2 Rotor Truing Fork

Park Tool PP-1.2 Hydraulic Brake Piston Press

Shimano TL-EW02 Di2 Plug Tool

Park Tool IR-1 Internal Cable Routing Kit

Park Tool VC-1 Valve Core Tool

Portland Design Works Mister Sparkle Chain Cleaner

Topeak Turbo Morph G Pump



Tools I want to get in the near future:

Abbey Hanger Alignment Gauge (HAG)

Truing stand (really want a P&K Lie or Aivee)

T handle Hex wrenches (Beta or PB-Swiss)

Wheels MFG headset press

Knipex Pliers and cable cutters

Mitutoyo 500-474 Solar Absolute Digimatic Calipers, 0-6" (0-150mm)


I have some other tools around that will probably end up replaced for putting in the box or just left out and stored. I am still building it out so things will change and there might be a duplicate tool or two or will be at some point but I gotta figure out what I really love and what I don't. Some tools were bought of necessity rather than exactly what I wanted.
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Old 12-07-20, 09:57 PM
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I have just the one multi-tool, but it has headset and bb spanners, cone wrenches, adjustable wrench, chain tool, allen keys, freewheel tools, socket set, spoke wrench (of course), tape measure, bb tool, chain whip, and a hammer. Sorta cumbersome, but it does everything.
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Old 12-07-20, 10:21 PM
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Way too many to list, pretty close to everything listed above, but the cool ones are
chris king classic and r45 hub rebuilding tools, they've seen enough use to make them worth it over the decades but glad I bought them as a shop employee directly from king.
Park pro truing stand
Park pro double arm repair stand
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Old 12-07-20, 11:15 PM
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JIS screw driver- Japanese Industry Standard derailleur screws appear to be phillips but are not. It will keep you from stripping screws. Park has one but is very expensive, Amazon has them as well.

you are welcome!
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Old 12-08-20, 08:35 AM
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veganbikes has an enviable collection of tools. I’m curious to know how you like the Decade.

I am surprised that more people with a decent collection of tools do not have hangar alignment gauges. Although they are expensive, there is no other tool that can do the job nearly as well. I have the Abbey and the EVT, but the Park one is much less expensive and probably as accurate, but more frustrating to use.

JIS screwdrivers are very handy, and not terribly expensive. I use the Vessel that you can get from Amazon.

An assortment of picks is also very handy and I pick them up more often than I thought I would. A few small brushes also help keep muck accumulation to a minimum.

Buy the assorted bottom bracket and headset tools as you need them, otherwise you will end up with a collection that you will not use.

A chain whip and cassette tool need to be high on the list of things to collect.
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Old 12-08-20, 08:45 AM
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Now that I've switched to disc brakes and tubeless tires I had to buy more.
A bead jack
special plastic hex tool for Campy/Fulcrum axles
Special 48/44 16 spline tool for wheels manufacturing bottom brackets
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Old 12-08-20, 09:02 AM
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All my bikes are old-school types and I can't count on the local shops having the tools needed to properly work on them. So, I have about a dozen different freewheel removers, a full Campagnolo tool kit, some specialized tools like cotter press, Mavic bottom bracket chamfer tool, taps and dies for various bottom bracket and steer tube threads, and of course a range of generalized hand tools.
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Old 12-08-20, 10:16 AM
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Everything I've needed to work on my 1997 Litespeed with Campagnolo square taper/ISIS/FSA Mega Exo bottom brackets and 1997 Campagnolo Chorus / 2000-2006 Record / PowerTap / SON hubs, plus the 1984 Univega I rode before that.

Your needs will vary.

My one regret is buying a Feedback Sports workstand not a Park. The Park at my office had a toggle clamp which was faster than the screw down on my stand, and its angle could be easily adjusted while the bike was mounted because it didn't rely on teeth to maintain the adjustment.

It doesn't quite irritate me enough to spend $200 fixing the problem, although I'd have happily spent another $50 buying the stand.

I'd probably buy a pair of Felco cable cutters instead of Park, although the Park have been fine for over 20 years.
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Old 12-08-20, 12:59 PM
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I'll add ones that haven't been mentioned by anyone else yet:

- Expanding punch for removing threaded headset headtube cups
- Spoke tension meter
- Derailleur hanger alignment tool
- Little "C" shaped chain link grabber (for use with chain breaker) and Quick-Link Removal pliers by Park
- Pin Spanner wrenches (various)
- Air Suspension Fork HP pump / fitting and gauge
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Old 12-08-20, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
veganbikes has an enviable collection of tools. I’m curious to know how you like the Decade.

I am surprised that more people with a decent collection of tools do not have hangar alignment gauges. Although they are expensive, there is no other tool that can do the job nearly as well. I have the Abbey and the EVT, but the Park one is much less expensive and probably as accurate, but more frustrating to use.

JIS screwdrivers are very handy, and not terribly expensive. I use the Vessel that you can get from Amazon.

An assortment of picks is also very handy and I pick them up more often than I thought I would. A few small brushes also help keep muck accumulation to a minimum.

Buy the assorted bottom bracket and headset tools as you need them, otherwise you will end up with a collection that you will not use.

A chain whip and cassette tool need to be high on the list of things to collect.
Thanks, I am quite happy with most of it. Some stuff I want to swap around and replace or add but generally a good set.

I love my Decade, the first time I put it into my hand I knew I had something special. It is a chunky boi but it works well. Though I will say it does seem to struggle a bit on 8 speed and below but with a replaceable plate at the bottom that could be easily fixed. However I don't do a whole lot of 8 speed and below currently.

JIS Screwdriver is the way to go. I don't deal in Phillips heads personally anymore the JIS tends to work better in those screws anyway without camming out. I think the Park Tool DSD is probably the nicest one I have used but I do have a Vessel somewhere around the house (or did)

That EVT Hanger tool is nice but at nearly twice the price of a Abbey Ti HAG, I can only do but drool and wait till I win the lotto (though they have this rule you have to actually play to win)
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Old 12-08-20, 03:00 PM
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I am a complete tool nerd, and I am as embarrassed as I am proud of my tool collection. To me, using quality tools brings me nearly as much joy as riding a bike that performs flawlessly.

I have no doubt that my tool expenditures would be viewed as excessive and unnecessary by the vast majority of people, including those on this forum. It is also people on this forum that would understand and admire the collection. I also buy tools with the knowledge that my son (who already borrows most of these tools or "owns" those that I have upgraded from) will inherit most of these tools, and they are of sufficient quality for him to pass them down as well.

Below is my tool list, in roughly what I would recommend as the order of acquisition for the category. The first tool in each category is either my most recent, or most favorite version of the tool. I am sure that i have missed a few.

1. Pump - Silca Ultimate with Hiro Chuck, Lezyne floor drive with Analog gauge
2. Tire Irons - Schwalbe, Pedros
3. Hex Keys - Beta (T-handle), Wera (L-Key), Wiha (Long L-key), Park (Y-handle)
4. Chain tool - Park CT3.x
5. Torx Keys - Bondhus
7. JIS screwdriver - Vessel
7. Cable Cutters - Knipex, Felco C7
8. Combination wrenches - Craftsman (USA)
9. Cone Wrenches - Park
10. Cassette tool - Abbey Crombie, Park FR-5.2
11. Chain Whip - Abbey, Park SR-18
12. Derailleur Alignment gauge - EVT Ultra tru-arc, Abbey HAG
13. Third Hand - Hozan
14. Torque Wrench - Gedore, Effetto Mariposa, Pro Components
15. Workstand - EVT EZ Lift, Park PCS-10
16. Bench Vise - Reed 405-1/2, Yost ADI-4
17. Adjustable wrenches - Knipex Pliers-wrench, Craftsman pro adjustable(crescent) wrenches
18. Pedal Wrench - EVT, Hozan, Park "hatchet"
19. Crank Puller - Park CWP-7
20. Bottom Bracket Tools - Various Chris King, Park
21. Bearing Press - Park HHP-2
22. Headset tools - Various Park Crown Race setters and cup removers
23. Star nut Setter - Park
24. Freewheel tools - Various Park
25. Spoke wrench - Park Master
26. Truing Stand - Park TRS2
28. Diagonal Cutters - Knipex
29. Needle Nose Pliers - Klein
30. Ratchets - SK tool, craftsman
31. Bit Ratchets - Wera, Wiha, Felo
32. Spoke Tensiometer - Park
33. Lockring Tool - Hozan
34. Pin Spanner - Park SPA-6, SPA-3 (discontinued)
35. Chain Checker - Park CC-2
36. Axle Vise - EVT

Last edited by aggiegrads; 12-08-20 at 03:04 PM.
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Old 12-08-20, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
That EVT Hanger tool is nice but at nearly twice the price of a Abbey Ti HAG, I can only do but drool and wait till I win the lotto (though they have this rule you have to actually play to win)
That sums up exactly my thoughts about the Decade.

Fortunately, I didn't pay retail for my EVT EZ-lift - I got it in trade.
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Old 12-08-20, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Carverbiker View Post
JIS screw driver- Japanese Industry Standard derailleur screws appear to be phillips but are not. It will keep you from stripping screws. Park has one but is very expensive, Amazon has them as well.

you are welcome!
I just bought JIS screwdriver tips for a magnetic screwdriver. But, yes, it is so much better with screws on the bike.
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Old 12-08-20, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Tools I want to get in the near future:

Abbey Hanger Alignment Gauge (HAG)
Truing stand (really want a P&K Lie or Aivee)
T handle Hex wrenches (Beta or PB-Swiss)
Wheels MFG headset press
Knipex Pliers and cable cutters
Mitutoyo 500-474 Solar Absolute Digimatic Calipers, 0-6" (0-150mm)

.
Holy cow, that Aivee is gorgeous. I thought I wanted a DT Swiss stand until I saw that one.

The HAG is great for travel, much better than the EVT. My only gripe with the HAG is that it won't "hang". The handle and rod will slide off of the shaft and onto the floor if you let go of it while you are working.

I have and like the Betas, but one (specifically my 8mm) is oversized and doesn't fully seat in my pedals. I have not tried PB swiss, only because I have Wiha and Wera L-wrenches which are excellent.

Knipex pliers are the bomb. I have several sizes, and a couple of duplicates for my travel kit. You will not regret these, I promise. Most of my other tools started migrating to Knipex after I first used the pliers wrench.

I have a set of Mitutoyo (Imperial) dial calipers that are about 20 years old (got them for a machining class in grad school). I recently bought a set of Mitutoyo verniers and really like them. I had the Park digitals and they eat batteries. After several years of use, I got sick of always needing to replace the batteries what seemed like every time I went to pick them up. Consequently, I started leaving a set of reading glasses on the work bench when I got the verniers.
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Old 12-08-20, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I just bought JIS screwdriver tips for a magnetic screwdriver. But, yes, it is so much better with screws on the bike.
I got these Wera bits in 50mm so I can tell the difference between JIS and regular philips bits. They are JIS. I carry bit wrenches on the bike partly so I can carry real JIS bits.
https://www.kctoolco.com/wera-135532...ips-power-bit/
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Old 12-08-20, 06:08 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
Holy cow, that Aivee is gorgeous. I thought I wanted a DT Swiss stand until I saw that one.

The HAG is great for travel, much better than the EVT. My only gripe with the HAG is that it won't "hang". The handle and rod will slide off of the shaft and onto the floor if you let go of it while you are working.

I have and like the Betas, but one (specifically my 8mm) is oversized and doesn't fully seat in my pedals. I have not tried PB swiss, only because I have Wiha and Wera L-wrenches which are excellent.

Knipex pliers are the bomb. I have several sizes, and a couple of duplicates for my travel kit. You will not regret these, I promise. Most of my other tools started migrating to Knipex after I first used the pliers wrench.

I have a set of Mitutoyo (Imperial) dial calipers that are about 20 years old (got them for a machining class in grad school). I recently bought a set of Mitutoyo verniers and really like them. I had the Park digitals and they eat batteries. After several years of use, I got sick of always needing to replace the batteries what seemed like every time I went to pick them up. Consequently, I started leaving a set of reading glasses on the work bench when I got the verniers.
Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
That sums up exactly my thoughts about the Decade.

Fortunately, I didn't pay retail for my EVT EZ-lift - I got it in trade.
You have a kit as well...humna humna : )

The Aivee is my new favorite. I have heard P&K Lie is more accurate and potentially cheaper but the Aivee has that truing stand look but I am sucker for brass...ahhh the decisions of a tool *****.

It has been Knipex vs Felco for a while but after thinking about it more and more I want Knipex but maybe I might end up with both. Nobody has ever had too many tools to cut things.

Beta's are always well reviewed and heavily used in the pro-mechanic circuit and the weight is not bad for them. I do like the new Park Tool T handle stuff but it is just a boat anchor and I have played around with the speed sleeve but I don't know that I would use it that often. My Wera L keys are great but I don't love the wrap on them I think the PB Swiss is what I have been wanting all along as they are close to the Silca wrenches but have the rainbow and maybe are a little better shaped. I did get a whole bunch of people in the shop to get them, I was talking Allen keys and they were like I think I might just get Bondhus or Park or something, and I was like nope, get the best you can and you will thank me. They have. Though I wish I had done the stainless Torx keys but was available at the time and just wanted to get them and get it done. Honestly they will be fine they just don't match.

The battery issue is why I want the Mitutoyo solars I just hate going for it and no batteries or having to remove the batteries all the time and put them back in. I have a cheap generic set and they are probably close enough to the Park but I hate batteries and USB charged could work but the solar seems like the best solution.

Good lookin' on that stand. I really want a Park electric stand at home after using them at work all the time they are just so much easier. I have used the EVT once and it was nice but currently have been ok with my old Park stand but may swap to a PRS-25 so I have a bit more adjustment and portability.
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Old 12-08-20, 06:38 PM
  #22  
aggiegrads
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It has been Knipex vs Felco for a while but after thinking about it more and more I want Knipex but maybe I might end up with both. Nobody has ever had too many tools to cut things.
I have had the Felcos for 30 years. They are great and I would not discourage anyone from buying those.

The Knipex don't really work much better than Felcos, but it is nice to have two crimpers integrated into the body. The hex crimper is for the brass ferrules that come with most brake cables and the dimple crimper is amazing for cable tips.
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Old 12-08-20, 08:19 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
I have had the Felcos for 30 years. They are great and I would not discourage anyone from buying those.

The Knipex don't really work much better than Felcos, but it is nice to have two crimpers integrated into the body. The hex crimper is for the brass ferrules that come with most brake cables and the dimple crimper is amazing for cable tips.
That is what I have surmised and why I like the Knipex.
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Old 12-08-20, 08:24 PM
  #24  
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I worked in shops for a number of years as a young man. I accumulated a number of tools over the years but nothing too specialized. Anything I needed to strip a bike and rebuild I have. I don't have frame straighteners, bottom bracket thread cutters, headset cup seater, or other specialized tools. I consider my tools regular "shop tools" that are used every day. Obviously I haven't worked in shops for many years but I still have the tools...good ones too. I never skimped on quality. Buy once, cry once.

My suggestion is only buy what you think you'll use often and buy the very best you can afford. The other tools you can borrow or take your bike to the shop to have the work done. To me it's pointless to spend $200 bucks on a cool tool that you'll maybe use once a year.

I do most of the work on my own cars also so many of these tools double for both. One thing, I acquired these tools during 40+ years of my life, I'm 62 now.

Here's a short list of what I own. I own a lot more than this (they fill two full stand-up rolling tool chests) but this is what I use most often on my bikes and cars:

Wrenches - Snap On
Screw drivers - Snap On, MAC and Cornwell
Socket wrenches - Snap On and vintage USA-made Craftsman
Sockets - Snap On (nothing works better on worn or stripped nuts and bolts...nothing)
Cone wrenches - Park and Campy
Allen wrenches - Bondus and PB Swiss
Pliers - Channelock, Klein, Visegrip and vintage Craftsman
Bottom bracket tools - Campy and Park
Headset wrenches - Park and Campy
Freewheel tools - several per maker
Brakes tools - my fingers and hands
Pedal wrench - VAR and Park Pro-level
Chain breaker - Hozan pro model
Spoke wrenches - Campy wheel, VAR and Park
Cable cutter - my trusty 40 year old VAR
Wheel truing jig - Park TS-2
Bike stand - Park Team Issue and a PCS-10

The red tool chest is for my bike-only tools. The blue chest is for my car tools.



The tray on top of my stand is one I made from a bamboo kitchen tray I got at a kitchen store for cheap and bolted it on top. I made it for less than $10 bucks and it works great!


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Old 12-08-20, 09:50 PM
  #25  
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Nothing fancy for me, just a few basic items, a set of hex wrenches or allen keys, a spoke tensioner, a Bontrager multitool, a torque wrench and a floor pump, almost everything on my bike can be worked on with a hex wrench and I don't need much more since I live a block away from the Trek Store.
Cheers!

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