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Air compressor specs for tubeless tire installation?

Old 12-28-20, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Something was wrong with that compressor. It should not be spitting oil out like that. I have has several and never had that happen. Heck, I need to ADD oil to most of my guns.
It may also have been water, especially in high humidity and no water trap on the compressor.
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Old 12-28-20, 06:58 AM
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I'd be specing a new compressor on all the intended uses, not just one. From all I hear from tubeless advocates, you'll never have to mess with those tires again until you need new ones.
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Old 12-28-20, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
If the only way to seat the bead is to fiddle with the tire while the air is still blasting through.... enough so that a small compressor can’t keep up... you really need to look at how you are taping the rims. Those tire beads are much too loose.
I don’t agree there. I mean, yes, the issue is no interference between rim and bead (i.e. looseness), but some tires, like Compass, are well-known for supple sidewalls which don’t sit uniformly on the rim bed, creating opportunities for air escape. Sometimes adding layers of tape works, but only to an extent; too much tape can interfere with bead seating. And then the amount of tape which works for one brand may not work for the next, so then what? Spend time and money to remove and retape with less? I prefer to be more economical and use the air compressor as a tool, rather than just a method to get air in the tire. And don’t some rims not need tape at all?Working the tire a bit with air flowing can get the job done sometimes, with the least cost, time, and fuss.

Last edited by chaadster; 12-28-20 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 12-28-20, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
I don’t agree there. I mean, yes, the issue is no interference between rim and bead (i.e. looseness), but some tires, like Compass, are well-known for supple sidewalls which don’t sit uniformly on the rim bed, creating opportunities for air escape. Sometimes adding layers of tape works, but only to an extent; too much tape can interfere with bead seating. And then the amount of tape which works for one brand may not work for the next, so then what? Spend time and money to remove and retape with less? I prefer to be more economical and use the air compressor as a tool, rather than just a method to get air in the tire. And don’t some rims not need tape at all?Working the tire a bit with air flowing can get the job done sometimes, with the least cost, time, and fuss.
The tape just seals the spoke holes. if you have rims with no spoke holes (thee is such thing, but has other disadvantages), no tape is needed. the tape doesn't have to be too wide, it only needs to cover the holes safely.

if you do a bad tape job, a compressor won't help. that would just bite you later when you lose air over time.
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Old 12-28-20, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
The tape just seals the spoke holes. if you have rims with no spoke holes (thee is such thing, but has other disadvantages), no tape is needed. the tape doesn't have to be too wide, it only needs to cover the holes safely.

if you do a bad tape job, a compressor won't help. that would just bite you later when you lose air over time.
Right...my point was that adding more tape is neither a cure-all nor even a substitute for air volume in some cases.
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Old 12-28-20, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
I don’t agree there. I mean, yes, the issue is no interference between rim and bead (i.e. looseness), but some tires, like Compass, are well-known for supple sidewalls which don’t sit uniformly on the rim bed, creating opportunities for air escape. Sometimes adding layers of tape works, but only to an extent; too much tape can interfere with bead seating. And then the amount of tape which works for one brand may not work for the next, so then what? Spend time and money to remove and retape with less? I prefer to be more economical and use the air compressor as a tool, rather than just a method to get air in the tire. And don’t some rims not need tape at all?Working the tire a bit with air flowing can get the job done sometimes, with the least cost, time, and fuss.
Originally Posted by chaadster
Right...my point was that adding more tape is neither a cure-all nor even a substitute for air volume in some cases.
Wrong, it is the other way around.... more air volume is a poor substitute for an inadequate taping job.

If the bead is loose enough on the rim that it requires the method you described (futzing with the tire as air continues to blast through), I would not ride that setup. It is too loose and will be too prone to burping or blowing off..... which previous generations of Compass tires were known for. I have a current generation of the Barlow Pass, and while I did use a compressor to seat them, they snap in place with the first initial blast a second or two at most.

Yes, it does sometimes take extra time to get the tape right for certain tire/rim combos. But that is what is required to do it properly. If the tape required to seat the bead is so much that the bead won't seat properly..... that is a bad tire-rim combo and IMO is unsafe (older Compass tires with some rims, for example). The fact that you are able to force it to seat without enough tape does not change that.

However, the reality is that in all the tubeless setups I have done (well over a dozen) I have never changed the tape setup. In retrospect, I should have in one case (the Maxxis mentioned below)

Ideally, you don't even need a compressor for a well-fitting tubeless setup (that includes being properly taped), at least not for typical MTB tires. I went 8 years and a dozen tubeless setups before I ever even needed to use a compressor to set a bead. I did use one for my fat tires and my Barlow Pass Tires, and one 2.3" Maxxix MTB tire that I was not tubeless ready. I now know that with proper taping, I could have set that Maxxis with a floor pump, and I will likely go back and fix that. But in ALL cases, the tire snapped into place immediately with a compressor.
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Old 12-28-20, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
The tape just seals the spoke holes. if you have rims with no spoke holes (thee is such thing, but has other disadvantages), no tape is needed. the tape doesn't have to be too wide, it only needs to cover the holes safely.

if you do a bad tape job, a compressor won't help. that would just bite you later when you lose air over time.
Sometimes tape only needs to cover the holes. Other times it needs to go all the way to the edge to form a better seal with the tire bead in order to set the bead, but also to keep the bead sealed in use in the event that the bead is momentarily unseated.

I leaned this the hard way
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Old 12-28-20, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Wrong, it is the other way around.... more air volume is a poor substitute for an inadequate taping job.

If the bead is loose enough on the rim that it requires the method you described (futzing with the tire as air continues to blast through), I would not ride that setup. It is too loose and will be too prone to burping or blowing off..... which previous generations of Compass tires were known for. I have a current generation of the Barlow Pass, and while I did use a compressor to seat them, they snap in place with the first initial blast a second or two at most.

Yes, it does sometimes take extra time to get the tape right for certain tire/rim combos. But that is what is required to do it properly. If the tape required to seat the bead is so much that the bead won't seat properly..... that is a bad tire-rim combo and IMO is unsafe (older Compass tires with some rims, for example). The fact that you are able to force it to seat without enough tape does not change that.

However, the reality is that in all the tubeless setups I have done (well over a dozen) I have never changed the tape setup. In retrospect, I should have in one case (the Maxxis mentioned below)

Ideally, you don't even need a compressor for a well-fitting tubeless setup (that includes being properly taped), at least not for typical MTB tires. I went 8 years and a dozen tubeless setups before I ever even needed to use a compressor to set a bead. I did use one for my fat tires and my Barlow Pass Tires, and one 2.3" Maxxix MTB tire that I was not tubeless ready. I now know that with proper taping, I could have set that Maxxis with a floor pump, and I will likely go back and fix that. But in ALL cases, the tire snapped into place immediately with a compressor.
I don’t follow your logic on most of this, nor agree with your conclusions.

If a bead doesn’t seat properly, the tire ain’t on right, so that’s a non-issue here, regardless of amount of tape.

If the beads snap in with a bit of wrangling and air, that’s just as fine and good as if there was more tape intereference, because once seated, the amount of tape in the rim bed doesn’t matter...the tape does nothing other than to help seat the bead (and seal spoke holes) by retaining enough air to get the bead up on the shelf and into the rim hooks. Tape is not responsible for, nor a requirement, for bead retention in the hooks.

Again, some rims require no tape, and some rims have no hooks, so I’d encourage you to re-evaluate your assessment of the role of tape in tubeless setup.
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Old 12-28-20, 12:25 PM
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I want to thank everyone for the replies and discussion. Clearly, there are too many variables between rim and tire brands and designs, as well as technique, to make establishing minimum compressor specs viable. I started running road tubeless in ‘13, IIRC, and I hardly feel that I’ve more insight into what I need from a compressor today than I did then, so the lack of consensus doesn’t surprise me.

So two things today...

I went to Home Depot yesterday and bought an HDX brand 1gal garden sprayer (https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-1-Ga...HDXA/307766754), thinking it would be interesting to see if I could do this without a compressor. The included bits mixed up just perfectly to fit snugly on the valve stem; I used the fluid pickup tube as the valve stem hose. After several attempts discharging various pressures from the sprayer/jug, and futzing with adding tape, I was able to get the 650bx48 tire up on the shelf, but unable to seat it. I was doing about 50 strokes on the sprayer, which got to be exhausting! Once it did hold some air, I switched to my floor pump but was unable to get enough air going in to overcome the amount leaking out the unseated bead, so that was a fail. This was with a WTB i23 rim with factory tape plus three additional layers of Easton tape and a Herse Switchback Hill tire. Had I a compressor, it’d have worked.

Frustrated, arm blown out, and running out of time today, I re-resolved (!) to just get a damn compressor again. I also dropped the wheels and tires to my LBS to get installed since they are right on the way to HD, I got sh*t to do, and definitely want to ride tomorrow. At HD, I bought a 4.5gal Husky unit: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-4-...0445/305026725. I know... and I’d have preferred to buy Lowe’s, but the premium was $150 for a Dewalt unit there, which was just really too much more for me to spend on this thing which I’m going to barely use.

Anyhoo, the Husky was laid out to fit perfectly where I wanted it, although I’d have liked the drain plug on the front, but it does have wheels so I can pull it out easily to do that. I hooked up my old hose reel, and ordered a Park inflator to replace my POS Prestaflator, so I should be good to go once that arrives. Even tucked into it’s little cave under the stairs, at 67dB, it is totally unobtrusive and a huge, huge improvement over my old Central Pneumatic unit.

I’m really hoping— and really confident— that once I get the pump head, I’ll have a system with virtually pro-level capacity to tackle tackle any bike tire situation I may face. I forget what I paid for the hose reel those years ago, but a similar (and longer) one is available today for $90, so I’m calling my “all in” on this one at $450. Given a Bontrager TLR Flash Charger floor pump is $150, I reckon the $300 buys me a ton of convenience and additional capability, so I’m happy.

Here’s a not-very-flattering pic of where I stuffed it, under the steps and right next to my work bench:


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Old 12-28-20, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
If a bead doesn’t seat properly, the tire ain’t on right, so that’s a non-issue here, regardless of amount of tape.
Well of course.... but I don't understand what point of mine you are addressing here.

Originally Posted by chaadster
If the beads snap in with a bit of wrangling and air, that’s just as fine and good as if there was more tape intereference, because once seated, the amount of tape in the rim bed doesn’t matter...the tape does nothing other than to help seat the bead (and seal spoke holes) by retaining enough air to get the bead up on the shelf and into the rim hooks. Tape is not responsible for, nor a requirement, for bead retention in the hooks.
The issue is not whether it helps retain the bead seal against the bead seat, it is what happens if that seal gets broken. The same bead/tape contact that lets you seat the bead easily is also what minimizes the air loss before the bead re-seats. This happens very quickly and you might not even know it happened. If there is too much of a gap there, that can result in a very large and sudden loss of air. This is what burping is. And a big burp is a nearly instantaneously flat tire..... and usually this will happen at the worst possible times (when the tire is encountering some hard side load).

Originally Posted by chaadster
Again, some rims require no tape, and some rims have no hooks, so I’d encourage you to re-evaluate your assessment of the role of tape in tubeless setup.
If a rim really needs no tape, that would mean you are not having to go through what you describe to get them to seat. If you don't put tape on a rim and need to go through what you describe, it in fact DOES need tape (even if there are no spoke holes), at least with that tire. Whether or not the rims are hooked or more of a Stans design is irrelevant to this.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-28-20 at 02:23 PM.
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Old 12-28-20, 02:01 PM
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I keep getting tempted to buy an air compressor, but the 2-liter soda bottle with two valves and a hose attached to it has been working fine or about two years. remove the valve core on the wheel, attach hose directly, pump bottle to a mere 40 psi while holding the hose pinched closed, then let it fly. works 99% of the time on the first try. if not, I wiggle the tire onto the rim a little better and try again. takes less than five minutes from start to finish.
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Old 12-28-20, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Well of course.... but I don't understand what point of mine you are addressing here.



The issue is not whether it helps retain the bead seal against the bead seat, it is what happens if that seal gets broken. The same bead/tape contact that lets you seat the bead easily is also what minimizes the air loss before the bead re-seats. This happens very quickly and you might not even know it happened. If there is too much of a gap there, that can result in a very large and sudden loss of air. This is what burping is. And a big burp is a nearly instantaneously flat tire..... and usually this will happen at the worst possible times (when the tire is encountering some hard side load).


If a rim really needs no tape, that would mean you are not having to go through what you describe to get them to seat. If you don't put tape on a rim and need to go through what you describe, it in fact DOES need tape (even if there are no spoke holes), at least with that tire. Whether or not the rims are hooked or more of a Stans design is irrelevant to this.
Here again, I fundamentally disagree with your presumptions and conclusions.

To reiterate, tape has nothing to do with proper tubeless fit, and ideally, is not used at all, because it interferes with the the precise mating of the bead lock (on the rim bed) and the bead. Tapes only purpose is to seal spoke holes, not to ensure fit, and in fact, using tape to achieve fit is a kludge for less-than-ideal rim and tire bead seat diameter matching. The whole reason hookless rims work is because of the precise fit of the bead lock and bead; sticking tape in there softens those interface edges and reduces the efficacy of the bead lock.

If your rim and tire don’t fit together properly, that’s where tape comes in, but that’s not how tubeless should work. Using air, on the other hand, to seat a bead has no impact on the fit; it does not alter the bead-to-bead lock interface, or anything. If you can blow a bead up into place and it holds air, that’s as good as it gets...presuming you’re using a proper tubeless tire with correct fit and rigid bead construction.

The reason we have these issues is because tires are not manufactured to the tight specs that, say, car tires are manufactured to with regards to bead/bead lock fit, so we’ve taken to relying on tape to make up for those failures. Similarly, molded, hooked rims are not not manufactued to the same tight specs, either, so again, tape is a hack to make up for it. Some rims are proper, and some tires are proper. Air is always the same, and has no impact on fit whatsoever, so if you get the bead up just using air, even if you have to work the tire around a bit, that means you either have a bead with an interference fit on the rim bed, or you have a perfect rim/tire match up, but, having beads with an interfernce fit on the rim bed (i.e. before seating) does not mean you have good fit when seated.

Again, my view is that tape is not a part of good tubeless design, but can be helpful when the tire and rim are not matched perfectly or you have insufficient air volume to position and move the bead.
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Old 12-28-20, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
I want to thank everyone for the replies and discussion. Clearly, there are too many variables between rim and tire brands and designs, as well as technique, to make establishing minimum compressor specs viable. I started running road tubeless in ‘13, IIRC, and I hardly feel that I’ve more insight into what I need from a compressor today than I did then, so the lack of consensus doesn’t surprise me.

So two things today...

I went to Home Depot yesterday and bought an HDX brand 1gal garden sprayer (https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-1-Ga...HDXA/307766754), thinking it would be interesting to see if I could do this without a compressor. The included bits mixed up just perfectly to fit snugly on the valve stem; I used the fluid pickup tube as the valve stem hose. After several attempts discharging various pressures from the sprayer/jug, and futzing with adding tape, I was able to get the 650bx48 tire up on the shelf, but unable to seat it. I was doing about 50 strokes on the sprayer, which got to be exhausting! Once it did hold some air, I switched to my floor pump but was unable to get enough air going in to overcome the amount leaking out the unseated bead, so that was a fail. This was with a WTB i23 rim with factory tape plus three additional layers of Easton tape and a Herse Switchback Hill tire. Had I a compressor, it’d have worked.

Frustrated, arm blown out, and running out of time today, I re-resolved (!) to just get a damn compressor again. I also dropped the wheels and tires to my LBS to get installed since they are right on the way to HD, I got sh*t to do, and definitely want to ride tomorrow. At HD, I bought a 4.5gal Husky unit: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-4-...0445/305026725. I know... and I’d have preferred to buy Lowe’s, but the premium was $150 for a Dewalt unit there, which was just really too much more for me to spend on this thing which I’m going to barely use.

Anyhoo, the Husky was laid out to fit perfectly where I wanted it, although I’d have liked the drain plug on the front, but it does have wheels so I can pull it out easily to do that. I hooked up my old hose reel, and ordered a Park inflator to replace my POS Prestaflator, so I should be good to go once that arrives. Even tucked into it’s little cave under the stairs, at 67dB, it is totally unobtrusive and a huge, huge improvement over my old Central Pneumatic unit.

I’m really hoping— and really confident— that once I get the pump head, I’ll have a system with virtually pro-level capacity to tackle tackle any bike tire situation I may face. I forget what I paid for the hose reel those years ago, but a similar (and longer) one is available today for $90, so I’m calling my “all in” on this one at $450. Given a Bontrager TLR Flash Charger floor pump is $150, I reckon the $300 buys me a ton of convenience and additional capability, so I’m happy.

Here’s a not-very-flattering pic of where I stuffed it, under the steps and right next to my work bench:

congrats on the compressor and setup. I like the retractable hose you have. I just have a "normal" hose and hate the clutter that gets dirty. That compressor also seems to be reasonably silent. I don't understand why they have the 2-tank setup since that seems more expensive to make.
Oil-free is cool. One of the disadvantages of mine is when it is under 40F, it starts very hard and slowly. I have it in my un-heated garage. I assume an oil-free compressor doesn't have the problem for lack of a lubricant that can be too viscous when cold. But I'm not sure if oil-free just means it is a sealed lube system.

I doubt you have to worry about that setup not working out. For some reason I now hope my setup breaks so I have an excuse to get a similar setup.... I swear I sometimes use the floor pump just because I don't want to have the noisy compressor on.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
Here again, I fundamentally disagree with your presumptions and conclusions.

To reiterate, tape has nothing to do with proper tubeless fit, and ideally, is not used at all, because it interferes with the the precise mating of the bead lock (on the rim bed) and the bead. Tapes only purpose is to seal spoke holes, not to ensure fit, and in fact, using tape to achieve fit is a kludge for less-than-ideal rim and tire bead seat diameter matching. The whole reason hookless rims work is because of the precise fit of the bead lock and bead; sticking tape in there softens those interface edges and reduces the efficacy of the bead lock.

If your rim and tire don’t fit together properly, that’s where tape comes in, but that’s not how tubeless should work. Using air, on the other hand, to seat a bead has no impact on the fit; it does not alter the bead-to-bead lock interface, or anything. If you can blow a bead up into place and it holds air, that’s as good as it gets...presuming you’re using a proper tubeless tire with correct fit and rigid bead construction.

The reason we have these issues is because tires are not manufactured to the tight specs that, say, car tires are manufactured to with regards to bead/bead lock fit, so we’ve taken to relying on tape to make up for those failures. Similarly, molded, hooked rims are not not manufactued to the same tight specs, either, so again, tape is a hack to make up for it. Some rims are proper, and some tires are proper. Air is always the same, and has no impact on fit whatsoever, so if you get the bead up just using air, even if you have to work the tire around a bit, that means you either have a bead with an interference fit on the rim bed, or you have a perfect rim/tire match up, but, having beads with an interfernce fit on the rim bed (i.e. before seating) does not mean you have good fit when seated.

Again, my view is that tape is not a part of good tubeless design, but can be helpful when the tire and rim are not matched perfectly or you have insufficient air volume to position and move the bead.
You are welcome to your views on tubeless design and how tape interferes with proper bead seating. It would seem that manufacturers and professional mechanics do not share these views.

I have explained to you WHY it matters to get as close a fit as you can with tape rather than relying solely on massive, prolonged air flow (i.e., what happens if the bead seal breaks), but you seem to feel you got this all figured out already and are not hearing it. Hopefully you don't learn the hard what what I was explaining to you, or you don't get someone else hurt.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-28-20 at 04:52 PM.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
Seems a bummer that there is not more specific understanding and guidance on this.
Seems like "any compressor will do" is as specific of an answer as anyone has ever gotten.

Honestly, don't over think this. You can buy a 3 phase industrial compressor with nuclear grade fittings if you want. Or you can buy that floor pump dsbrantrj listed.
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Old 12-28-20, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Pop N Wood
Seems like "any compressor will do" is as specific of an answer as anyone has ever gotten.

Honestly, don't over think this. You can buy a 3 phase industrial compressor with nuclear grade fittings if you want. Or you can buy that floor pump dsbrantrj listed.
That would make sense, but the OP does not believe in taping rims to fit the tire. Thus massive and sustained air delivery is required, more than any professional mechanic would ever need.
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Old 12-28-20, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun
congrats on the compressor and setup. I like the retractable hose you have. I just have a "normal" hose and hate the clutter that gets dirty. That compressor also seems to be reasonably silent. I don't understand why they have the 2-tank setup since that seems more expensive to make.
Oil-free is cool. One of the disadvantages of mine is when it is under 40F, it starts very hard and slowly. I have it in my un-heated garage. I assume an oil-free compressor doesn't have the problem for lack of a lubricant that can be too viscous when cold. But I'm not sure if oil-free just means it is a sealed lube system.

I doubt you have to worry about that setup not working out. For some reason I now hope my setup breaks so I have an excuse to get a similar setup.... I swear I sometimes use the floor pump just because I don't want to have the noisy compressor on.
Thanks, and yeah, I know exactly how that is! That was me about three days ago when I went to fire up the old Central Pneumatics; it was so freakin’ loud it tripled my frustration level!
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Old 12-28-20, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
You are welcome to your views on tubeless design and how tape interferes with proper bead seating. It would seem that manufacturers and professional mechanics do not share these views.

I have explained to you WHY it matters to get as close a fit as you can with tape rather than relying solely on massive, prolonged air flow (i.e., what happens if the bead seal breaks), but you seem to feel you got this all figured out already and are not hearing it. Hopefully you don't learn the hard what what I was explaining to you, or you don't get someone else hurt.
References? Or do you mean you don’t agree? Enve definitely agree with me: https://www.gravelcyclist.com/bicycl...ve-composites/
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Old 12-28-20, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
That would make sense, but the OP does not believe in taping rims to fit the tire. Thus massive and sustained air delivery is required, more than any professional mechanic would ever need.
I’m going to pick up my wheels at Motor City Bicycle tomorrow; are you sure that my compressor delivers more “massive and sustained air delivery” than any pro would need? I can take a pic of their compressor setup for you, if you want, and we can discuss it.
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Old 12-28-20, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
I’m going to pick up my wheels at Motor City Bicycle tomorrow; are you sure that my compressor delivers more “massive and sustained air delivery” than any pro would need? I can take a pic of their compressor setup for you, if you want, and we can discuss it.
While you are there, ask them about your theory that you don't need to worry about taping a rim as long as you can use the method you describe to force the bead to seat. If they have any idea what they are doing, they will tell you that if a bead does not pop into place almost immediately with a compressor, something is amiss.

Or ask them specifically this: you try to set a tire with a compressor, and it does not set on its own. You try tall the usual tricks of pulling the bead on to the seat and trying again, soap, using a tube. None of this works, Do you
a) add another layer of rim tape and try again
b) determine that this is a bad tire rim combo and abort
c) keep the air blasting through as you yank the bead into place and call it good if you succeed.

Let me know if they choose C.

There are plenty of uses that require a large compressor. Seating a single bicycle tire should not be one of them.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-28-20 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 12-28-20, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster
References? Or do you mean you don’t agree? Enve definitely agree with me: https://www.gravelcyclist.com/bicycl...ve-composites/
Nothing in that article is contrary to what I am telling you.

Sources? here are instructions from Enve on how to set up their rims
https://www.enve.com/en/journal/how-...ess-road-tire/
Notice they are taping the rim, and doing so from wall to wall. Apparently, they do not feel tape interferes with the bead seating.

WTB specs using rim tape 5mm wider than the internal width of the rim. I can tell you from experience with their rims and the recommended tape width, it goes completely from wall to wall.
https://www.wtb.com/products/tcs-rim-tape
Notice in the description they mention it creates an air tight seal with the tire.
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Old 12-28-20, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
While you are there, ask them about your theory that you don't need to worry about taping a rim as long as you can use the method you describe to force the bead to seat. If they have any idea what they are doing, they will tell you that if a bead does not pop into place almost immediately with a compressor, something is amiss.

There are plenty of other uses for a large compressor. Seating a single bicycle tire should not be one of them.
I don’t need to ask about the theory, because I saw them put it in practice when I dropped the wheel off. Jimmy tried to hook me up right away, but was unable to get the bead to catch. As I mentioned upthread, I added 3 layers of tape to the one wheel, and got that to catch and move up the shelf, but I didn’t have the pressure to seat it. The other rim got 1.5 extra layers before I ran out, and that is the one be tried without success to catch. Now I’ve known him as a tech for almost 10 years, since the Tree Fort days, and know he floats between the three MCB stores as chief tech, so I weight what he does far more heavily than what some random dudes who’ve not been on the forum even four years have to say.

Like I said, I appreciate your replies and the discussion, I just don’t agree with you and prefer to align my viewpoint with what Enve have to say on the matter, which I posted upthread. That, and I have my own years of experience with road tubeless which don’t seem to resonate with your perspective either. I’m not saying you or anyone else needs a better compressor; this thread was only about satisfying my own concerns with regard to compressor selection, and while I didn’t get the exact answers I was hoping, the discussion raised interesting questions and also made me comfortable in downsizing my tank capacity from what I had earlier.
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Old 12-28-20, 06:56 PM
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Well, I'm glad you got a compressor you like. Nothing wrong with having more capacity, and it will certainly do what you want it to. Enjoy the new toy!
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Old 12-28-20, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Nothing in that article is contrary to what I am telling you.

Sources? here are instructions from Enve on how to set up their rims
https://www.enve.com/en/journal/how-...ess-road-tire/
Notice they are taping the rim, and doing so from wall to wall. Apparently, they do not feel tape interferes with the bead seating.

WTB specs using rim tape 5mm wider than the internal width of the rim. I can tell you from experience with their rims and the recommended tape width, it goes completely from wall to wall.
https://www.wtb.com/products/tcs-rim-tape
Notice in the description they mention it creates an air tight seal with the tire.
Interesting interpretation, but not surprisingly at this point, I disagree with your assessment, and I think the Enve statements do contradict your perspective. Nowhere do they say to wrap multiple layers or continue to wrap to overcome fit problems. Nowhere do they say that tape is a functional part of the bead/rim interface. Further, they clearly state the importance of tight production tolerances, so it's ridiculous to think that mounding tape to unknown tolerances would make any sense.

With regards to WTB, let me just say that I did not select their rims, but rather, they came on the bike I selected. To say I'm unimpressed with their rim design thus far should go without saying.
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Old 12-28-20, 06:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Well, I'm glad you got a compressor you like. Nothing wrong with having more capacity, and it will certainly do what you want it to. Enjoy the new toy!
Fundamental distinction there in our perspectives: to me, the compressor is a tool, to you it is toy.
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