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Shimano 9 speed chain connector pin installed wrong way

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Shimano 9 speed chain connector pin installed wrong way

Old 04-02-21, 11:42 PM
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Jsendin
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Shimano 9 speed chain connector pin installed wrong way

I replaced the chain on a mates bike. Itís a 9 speed chain for a Deore set up.

It came with one of the Shimano connecting pins. After I installed it and the pin broke in half as itís supposed to I noticed it was not flush - about a mm sticking out. It seems loose and def not safe.

Upon closer inspection I realised that the connector pin (when still whole) has a pointed side and a flat side.

I pushed the flat side in first (wrong side) so the part of the pin that broke off was (I think) the part of the pin that was supposed to remain.

One solution : get a 9 speed quick link, but itís Easter weekend and with Covid itís not allowed to just pop into bike shop.

another solution Iím thinking is to remove the inserted incorrect pin. Remove another link to avoid plates that may have been damaged from insertion and removal of (wrong half of) connector pin. Try install the correct half of the connector pin.

im thinking if it ends up that the chain is now too short by one link then then reverting to the quick link solution will work

Am I the only one that thinks the connector pin design really sucks?

PS Iím not sure if Iím actually asking a question or if I am just talking through my plan of attack to feel better haha - sorry about that!
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Old 04-03-21, 05:34 AM
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I doubt this will be successful. Apologize and get your friend a quick link asap. Encourage him to use a shop for future maintenance.
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Old 04-03-21, 05:44 AM
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Jsendin
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
I doubt this will be successful. Apologize and get your friend a quick link asap. Encourage him to use a shop for future maintenance.
100% correct.

quick link ordered haha
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Old 04-03-21, 07:41 AM
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When Shimano first came out with chains that needed a special connection method (due to the higher side to side prying forces that indexed shifting helped produce and the lack of riders understanding about the benefits of soft pedaling during shifts) we saw many badly set installation pins, and not all were done by home wrenches too. Soon the industry caught up, for the most part professional wrenches (and factories) are setting the pins correctly these days.

Then the connecting links started to be developed in widths and retention strengths that hammer heads wouldn't break. Just like with the pins it took some time for the connecting links to be refined and to attain acceptance. Who here remembers the "Super Link" with its tiny screws?

Now Shimano is offering some of it's chains packed with a connecting link instead of a pin. But like many parts the current pandemic related supply issues these chains are not available consistently. For the local shop and the home mechanic connecting links are a smart consideration, perhaps the best one. But for the bike factories its about time and cost only. Pins cost less then links and once a chain assembly system is in place the insentive is to keep using that as long as possible. Andy
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Old 04-03-21, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
When Shimano first came out with chains that needed a special connection method (due to the higher side to side prying forces that indexed shifting helped produce and the lack of riders understanding about the benefits of soft pedaling during shifts) we saw many badly set installation pins, and not all were done by home wrenches too. Soon the industry caught up, for the most part professional wrenches (and factories) are setting the pins correctly these days.
Actually, it was the thinner chain plates brought on by 9-speed systems. But, yeah, replace the possibly damaged link with a quick link.
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Old 04-03-21, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat View Post
Actually, it was the thinner chain plates brought on by 9-speed systems. But, yeah, replace the possibly damaged link with a quick link.

? What was caused by the thinner chain side plates? Shimano still provided connecting pins on their 9 speed chains for years as Campy does for their 10+ speed stuff still. Connecting links (in my work era) came about when 7 speed cog sets were the newest thing. Andy
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Old 04-03-21, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
? What was caused by the thinner chain side plates? Shimano still provided connecting pins on their 9 speed chains for years as Campy does for their 10+ speed stuff still. Connecting links (in my work era) came about when 7 speed cog sets were the newest thing. Andy
I recall connecting pins for Shimano chains began with 7/8-speed and continued through 10-speed. I have purchased and installed many 10-speed Shimano chains and never had one that came with a quick link, only pins. Perhaps the newer 10-speed models (CN-5700, CN-6700, etc) and all 11-speed chain do come with Shimano links but I've never used one. I have used KMC and Wipperman chains with quick links and have occasionally installed the KMC link in Shimano chains.

And, yes, I remember the Craig Super Link. The 8-speed models worked fairly well but later ones, sold under the Forester name, wore very fast and developed a "click" within a couple hundred miles. I went back to using the Shimano pins!
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Old 04-03-21, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
And, yes, I remember the Craig Super Link. The 8-speed models worked fairly well but later ones, sold under the Forester name, wore very fast and developed a "click" within a couple hundred miles. I went back to using the Shimano pins!
I remember that; I think it was around the year 2000. At that point I just started using SRAM links with Shimano chains.

Then I decided it was silly to be buying the links separately, and just moved on to buying SRAM or KMC chains which included the links.
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Old 04-03-21, 02:09 PM
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Some cheapo chain breaking tools sold at Walmart, Dick's, Sports Academy and others will likely have a few quick links with them. If you have one near you, just check that it has the right size quick link for the speed of the chain. You'll have to remove the pin for the outer side plates anyway to use a quick link, so if you don't have a tool for that, then these cheapo ones usually work at least once or twice.

Also plan on getting a better quick link later when the LBS is open or from online.

Last edited by Iride01; 04-03-21 at 02:14 PM.
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