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So, can it be fixed?

Old 04-06-21, 10:04 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Troul View Post
can it? Yes. Will it exceed the cost rather than just finding a good frame or ready to go bicycle? More than likely so.
Right- obviously donít know your expectations, budget, frame size, exact locality, criteria, but if it were me, Iíd scrap that & look at stuff like this

Miyata 512 here, or maybe the Schwinn Traveler here

cause those get you better steel, maybe similar age, style, and size at a (likely-negotiable) price that is about what youíd
1. invest to get a new fork and/or frame
2. and the tools/parts/time or bike shop help and labor to swap everything over.

...Or if you donít need to get back on a road bike, just wait for your Bianchi :-)
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Old 04-07-21, 10:52 AM
  #27  
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Technically the fork could probably be bent back into the original position; HOWEVER, I agree with other posts, I would not ride a bike that had a fork bent that much.

Back in the day we would straighten forks on kids bikes that were bent but on adult bakes, if they were bent that severely, we would tell the customer that they need a new fork. Children weigh a lot less and the forks are much shorter so the likelihood of a catastrophic failure is much less....in my opinion. Not so for an adult bike.

I can't think of a worse way to crash than a catastrophic fork failure. ....esh, just makes me cringe.

Just a note: it's not a simple strap the fork straightener on there and pull back in to shape. To do it right, the fork would be removed, the fork crown and tube immobilized and the torque only applied to the bent part not of the crown joints. Stressing the crown joints can really compromise the integrity of the fork.

Last edited by drlogik; 04-07-21 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 04-07-21, 11:18 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by FelixScout View Post
Well the tech said there is concern about the the brazing in the lugs due to bike age and the severity of impact. And that led to this question.
I would be concerned about it too. Can if be fixed? Yeah, I am sure a competent builder could repair the frame, and you can buy a new fork. No question. Would it be worth the cost? No.
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Old 04-07-21, 12:16 PM
  #29  
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The metal is never the same once it's been bent & rebent back to be shape it was once in. Paperclip theory applies to you fork.

Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Technically the fork could probably be bent back into the original position; HOWEVER, I agree with other posts, I would not ride a bike that had a fork bent that much.
Back in the day we would straighten forks on kids bikes that were bent but on adult bakes, if they were bent that severely, we would tell the customer that they need a new fork. Children weigh a lot less and the forks are much shorter so the likelihood of a catastrophic failure is much less....in my opinion. Not so for an adult bike.

I can't think of a worse way to crash than a catastrophic fork failure. ....esh, just makes me cringe.

Just a note: it's not a simple strap the fork straightener on there and pull back in to shape. To do it right, the fork would be removed, the fork crown and tube immobilized and the torque only applied to the bent part not of the crown joints. Stressing the crown joints can really compromise the integrity of the fork.
What about a top tube & down tube breaking away from the head tube?
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Old 04-07-21, 01:16 PM
  #30  
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The metal is never the same once it's been bent & rebent back to be shape it was once in. Paperclip theory applies to you fork.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Technically the fork could probably be bent back into the original position; HOWEVER, I agree with other posts, I would not ride a bike that had a fork bent that much.
Back in the day we would straighten forks on kids bikes that were bent but on adult bakes, if they were bent that severely, we would tell the customer that they need a new fork. Children weigh a lot less and the forks are much shorter so the likelihood of a catastrophic failure is much less....in my opinion. Not so for an adult bike.

I can't think of a worse way to crash than a catastrophic fork failure. ....esh, just makes me cringe.

Just a note: it's not a simple strap the fork straightener on there and pull back in to shape. To do it right, the fork would be removed, the fork crown and tube immobilized and the torque only applied to the bent part not of the crown joints. Stressing the crown joints can really compromise the integrity of the fork.
What about a top tube & down tube breaking away from the head tube?
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Correct the metal is never the same. And, yes, the top tube and down tube could also be adversely effected as could the lugs that attach them to the crown and head tube. The braze joints at the fork drop-outs could also be compromised. Any other corrections, or have we sufficiently flogged this horse?
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Old 04-07-21, 01:21 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Correct the metal is never the same. And, yes, the top tube and down tube could also be adversely effected as could the lugs that attach them to the crown and head tube. The braze joints at the fork drop-outs could also be compromised. Any other corrections, or have we sufficiently flogged this horse?
wsnt correcting, i was giving a glimpse at my past when a head tube left me & the remaining frame behind. Low speeds, but damn did that hurt.
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Old 04-07-21, 01:28 PM
  #32  
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The fact you can put a tooth pick in the gap means it's unsafe and your LBS is correct. The head tube is probably off center and most LBS don't have the frame straightening tools anymore. Which means you would have to send this off to a specialist repair shop / framebuilder. The repair would far out cost what the frame is worth. I would keep the parts off the bike you like and go look for a decent used replacement bike.
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Old 04-07-21, 02:24 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
...It is an old Schwinn...
Get another frame and fork and transfer your components over to it.

In other words its not worth the fix... Unless... the bike is of sentimental value. In that case remember it is a steel bike and yes IT IS FIXABLE.
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Old 04-07-21, 02:40 PM
  #34  
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No prob...

wsnt correcting, i was giving a glimpse at my past when a head tube left me & the remaining frame behind. Low speeds, but damn did that hurt.
Y'ouch!!
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Old 04-07-21, 05:52 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
It is an old bike made of cheap steel that has been in at least one significant impact and is being used to haul a child around with one of their parents. Do you really need to say more than that? If I was a parent and this happened I wouldn't want to continue riding that bike. If it were something of value maybe I would give it a close inspection but a dime a dozen gas-pipe frame not at all. If I had special attachment to it I would use it as decoration like a wall hanger but I wouldn't want to carry myself much less my child.
Every word of this. Just find a new bike in decent shape and move on to riding with the kid.
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Old 04-08-21, 01:05 PM
  #36  
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Thank you all for satisfying my curiosity. I am going to strip the bike, scrap the frame, and maybe keep the fork for the memories.

This was my first "grown up" bike after almost 10 years not riding and I had it for 12 years, 3 cities, and many memories.

Old Wobbly, you will be missed.
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Old 04-08-21, 02:12 PM
  #37  
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and maybe keep the fork for the memories.
If you don't already own a truing stand, and if wheels still fit in the fork and don't bind on the crown, leave it and use it as is. Otherwise straighten the fork as best you can.

Clamp it in a vise. If you drill holes into the blades near the crown you can insert small bolts to use as a truing guide. Give it a snazzy paint job and you're good to go. And, it will be a memory that can still be utilitarian and useful!

I used a homemade truing stand at home made from a fork for many years until I got a Park Pro.



--

Last edited by drlogik; 04-08-21 at 02:24 PM.
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Old 04-08-21, 03:11 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by FelixScout View Post
Thank you all for satisfying my curiosity. I am going to strip the bike, scrap the frame, and maybe keep the fork for the memories.

This was my first "grown up" bike after almost 10 years not riding and I had it for 12 years, 3 cities, and many memories.

Old Wobbly, you will be missed.
Old Wobbly treated you well. How you find a replacement that you enjoy as much.
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