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Is it possible to swap rear quick release with traditional axle bolt?

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Is it possible to swap rear quick release with traditional axle bolt?

Old 04-19-21, 06:23 PM
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beach_cycle
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Is it possible to swap rear quick release with traditional axle bolt?

I want to try traditional 26Ē training wheels, but m new bike (Electra Townie 7D Equipped) has quick release wheels that will not support them. I need to teach my brain to ride a two wheel bike again. I had my brain injury 30 years ago, so the first time I did it was 1996; I bought a mountain bike and just rode, crashed and repeat. I was in my late 20ís and my body recovered faster. Within a few months, I was riding smooth and got back on a motorcycle. 50,000 miles later, crashed my Softail Custom and didnít ride again for 16 years. Now Iíve been primary riding adult trikes for 5 years (15,000 miles) and switching back to a single track vehicle is a challenge. Iíd rather enjoy riding my new bike without crashing, and willing to try training wheels for the conversion.



My LBS has 26Ē training wheels in stock, and theyíd be helpful when I take my new bike home Thursday. The problem is they are held on by the axle bolt, but my Electra Townie 7D Equipped has quick release. Furthermore, the equipped model has a hub that generates electricity for a rear light. Iím wondering if I can swap the quick release for an axle bolt. If I did that, would the power generator still work?
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Old 04-19-21, 07:32 PM
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Some people remove the cranks on little kids bikes instead of training wheels for their children.
They let them coast around under push power and they seem to adapt quickly.
Maybe try a version of that yourself?
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Old 04-19-21, 07:42 PM
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Bill Kapaun has the right idea, lower your saddle and remove your pedals or cranks and use it as a balance bike. The problem with training wheels is you don't learn you just have the ability to ride on 3 to 4 wheels which is not ideal. Maybe for an adult it is a bit different but a balance bike is the better way to do it. It seems like the balance is really what you need as you have trikes so pedaling isn't an issue so find a nice parking lot or better yet a grassy field and take off those pedals and scoot till you get your balance back.

You are unlikely to be able to swap easily to a nutted axle but you can go to your local shop and see what is possible but usually not. Also any light generation is done at the front hub or is a bottle dynamo which rubs the tire and occasionally you will see some by the bottom bracket but those aren't super common.
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Old 04-19-21, 07:46 PM
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Assuming that only the qr aspect is the problem and that the QR and axle in play are common 9.5 or 10mm ones that have been used for decades it seems that a swap over to a nutted (not bolted) axle is pretty straight forward. Of course parts availability might be an issue these days.

I've installed a few adult balancing (training is a term I dislike because the added outrigger wheels tend to be a crutch for many) wheels to 26" wheels bikes before and those bikes with derailures needed the ders removed and some chain tensioning aspect accounted for. If the bike has vertical drop outs this is challenging. I wonder if the shop knows this but hasn't explained it well yet. The added aspect of electrical assist might further complicate the install.

Good luck. Andy
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Old 04-25-21, 07:57 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions!



Yes, the power generator is a front dynamo hub. It was new to me, so I figured it out when I brought the bike home; tracing the wires...



I also prefer the term balance wheels; I don't like that I'm loosing my balance and they would be a crutch for me.



I didn't see the suggestions until I received an email. I took the bike home Thursday; pushed it as I don't drive a motor vehicle. Went to take a spin around my neighborhood Friday, but before I did, raised the seat for proper leg extension and inflated the tires to ~60 PSI, they were at ~25 PSI (below recommended 45-65 PSI). Maybe it was those conditions that let me test ride in the parking lot!? When I started my neighborhood spin, I lost balance and crashed at ~10 feet: cuts around my left eye, right hand and left knee; left hand sprained and my left eye is swollen. I gained enough balance to ride once, but now… maybe the push bike suggestion. I’ll check if the cranks are attached to square tapered bottom bracket (I have a crank puller for that and change chain wheels on my trikes – currently 49-111 gear inches and not enough power).
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Old 04-25-21, 08:20 PM
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I remember when my Dad removed my training wheels. I must have been about 3-4 years old. I remember getting on the bike afterwards, picking out where I was going to fall, and going for it. Then after awhile I didn't have to

After a severe bicycle injury years ago I had to do the same thing to get back in the saddle. My balance was off, my back history, and I had a tremor with vestibular problems to deal with. I got on my bike, picked out a place to fall, and went for it. After a short while I didn't have to.

So now I'm 67 with medical issues. I wear allot of protection. Even though I'm not falling I still keeping picking out my next place to fall just in case.

Good Luck...
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Old 04-25-21, 09:43 PM
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FWIW: a couple friends have developed balance issues as they have aged. One sustained a TBI that resulted in several months of care at the hospital where I work. Many of them have converted to recumbent trikes.

Bent Up Cycles in North Hollywood is a good place to start. They are very knowledgeable about recumbent trikes and the various adaptations needed.
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Old 04-28-21, 12:21 PM
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Protective Gear

Zandoval, I also remember my dad removing my training wheels; I was also 3-4. I donít remember much else, but Iím sure I just went for it (my MO). Now, Iíd like to wear protective gear. I donít know where to get it though. Bike pads and stuff in the department stores tend to be for kids 15 or younger and doesnít fit me. After last Fridays crash and the injuries around my left eye, I was considering a full face motorcycle helmet. Itís been a while since I rode off road 2 stroke MC, 12-14, but the shop had protective gear for youth and adults. I think that should be my next purchaseÖ including protective gear around my upper body and joints.



Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
I remember when my Dad removed my training wheels. I must have been about 3-4 years old. I remember getting on the bike afterwards, picking out where I was going to fall, and going for it. Then after awhile I didn't have to

After a severe bicycle injury years ago I had to do the same thing to get back in the saddle. My balance was off, my back history, and I had a tremor with vestibular problems to deal with. I got on my bike, picked out a place to fall, and went for it. After a short while I didn't have to.

So now I'm 67 with medical issues. I wear allot of protection. Even though I'm not falling I still keeping picking out my next place to fall just in case.

Good Luck...
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Old 04-28-21, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by beach_cycle View Post
Zandoval, I also remember my dad removing my training wheels; I was also 3-4. I donít remember much else, but Iím sure I just went for it (my MO). Now, Iíd like to wear protective gear. I donít know where to get it though. Bike pads and stuff in the department stores tend to be for kids 15 or younger and doesnít fit me. After last Fridays crash and the injuries around my left eye, I was considering a full face motorcycle helmet. Itís been a while since I rode off road 2 stroke MC, 12-14, but the shop had protective gear for youth and adults. I think that should be my next purchaseÖ including protective gear around my upper body and joints.
Off-road motorcycle gear seems like it would be a good place to look. My wife recently took up roller skating after a long hiatus, and she was able to get pretty substantial elbow and knee pads, one other idea.

As for the full face helmet, you should be able to find off road cycling helmets that have that. A friend of mine wore one to commute in San Francisco a few years ago after sustaining a face injury in a crash. https://www.gearhacker.com/best-full...helmet-review/
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Old 04-28-21, 01:06 PM
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Jeff Wills, Iíve considered recumbent trikes for a few years. But with my Social Security Disability I barely pay rent and buy budget food + hygiene and misc bike parts for my transportation (adult trikes). Iíve looked at Bent Up Cycles website for years, and their lowest prices are several thousand $; above the $2K Iím aloud to have with SSDI/SSI. I just looked again and saw an entry level recumbent trike listed: $1,299; no specs though. Iíll inquire...



I donít even know if I could sit that low; before the gyms closed, I confirmed I could sit in an exercise recumbent. I couldíve pulled it off with my stimulus, but built a new adult trike, donated it to make room for my new bike (2 bike limit) and then bought the bike. I spent over $1K and now trying to make the best of it...



Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
FWIW: a couple friends have developed balance issues as they have aged. One sustained a TBI that resulted in several months of care at the hospital where I work. Many of them have converted to recumbent trikes.

Bent Up Cycles in North Hollywood is a good place to start. They are very knowledgeable about recumbent trikes and the various adaptations needed.
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Old 04-28-21, 05:51 PM
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Andy, in 2017 I tried Stabilizer Wheels on my Mongoose Mountain Bike; theyíre bigger and heavier. The pair I bought from jet.com were advertised to fit 20-29Ē wheels, that bike had 29Ē wheels, so I thought I was good. They didnít fit; at the lowest setting the balance wheels were 3Ē off the ground. On rides it would hit hard when the balance wheels shifted side to side; Iíd ride on three wheels as long as possible until a force would shift (usually recovered but one day crashed breaking my hip requiring total hip replacement). I thought about that and checked with my LBS for a solution. The guy helping me was like these will work, and then another mechanic said not with QRÖ



These are similar to the old stabilizer wheels but say wonít fit with the chain guard. I can probably remove it. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...ACO5T769&psc=1



That bike also had QR and derailleur, but frame mounting didnít matter. They are wider and heavier. One review mentioned they donít fit 27Ē or larger. 29er failed and 26 may succeed. In the questions a 26Ē Electra Townie was said to work, so Iíll give them a spinÖ and hope they are a short term crutch.














Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Assuming that only the qr aspect is the problem and that the QR and axle in play are common 9.5 or 10mm ones that have been used for decades it seems that a swap over to a nutted (not bolted) axle is pretty straight forward. Of course parts availability might be an issue these days.

I've installed a few adult balancing (training is a term I dislike because the added outrigger wheels tend to be a crutch for many) wheels to 26" wheels bikes before and those bikes with derailures needed the ders removed and some chain tensioning aspect accounted for. If the bike has vertical drop outs this is challenging. I wonder if the shop knows this but hasn't explained it well yet. The added aspect of electrical assist might further complicate the install.

Good luck. Andy
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Old 04-28-21, 06:21 PM
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Lots of good ideas here. Another possibility for using the training wheels might be to ask your local bike shop or co-op if they have a nutted-axle wheel you could borrow for the time it takes you to regain your confidence.

Also, if you do the "balance bike" thing, you don't have to remove the cranks (which would also involve removing the chain). Just take off the pedals.
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Old 04-29-21, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by beach_cycle View Post
... my next purchase… including protective gear around my upper body and joints.​
I know this thread is getting old but I really wish you my best. I see myself having the same problem in the future. I am one of those guys that is more beat up than he looks and have had to make real adjustments in my riding and riding style. A friend of mine is recovering from a minor stroke that would have been major had he not been treated with the clot busters. He went to a cheap used WalMart three wheeler for about four months and is now riding a comfortable hybrid with touring tiers. He has told me he is just grateful to be able to ride period...

As for protective gear, don't forget what the Roller Blader's used to wear. The knee and wrist and elbow guards could be helpful.




By the way. My friend still keeps his cheap little three wheeler. He says its a real popular ride for the corner store and visitors.
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Old 05-01-21, 06:37 PM
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Years ago I sent an older gent out the door with a step-through Electra Townie. He loved it. He'd suffered a stroke, lost much of his reflexes and balance, and was inquiring about an adult trike so he could ride with his wife. He related that he could still balance, but not very well, and he was most concerned about getting his landing gear down quickly in an emergency. I explained that trikes were tippy in a sidehill situation, heavy, and not terribly maneuverable. After a test ride he fell in love with the Townie.
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