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Patching Party

Old 04-22-21, 02:38 PM
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Andrew R Stewart 
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Patching Party

No problems in this thread to answer but I thought I'd share results from my patching party. Typically each off season I hold a party where we all patch out rubes from the previous year. This was nixed for the last two winters so today I decided to party privately.

Here's the results. 16 rubes collected and saved for fixing. 11 were patched and now are testing for air retention over night. 3 tubes had no found hole (dipped into bucket of water multiple times) and are also being tested (could be crap in valve?) 2 tubes tossed due to impact flats (snake bite pairing of holes).


My "tools". Note the Clean streak and the Phil shot glass

I first find the hole (water dipping as needed and mark it with silver sharpie (the first photo shows some marks on the tubes by the jig's cone). Then I sand as usual to roughen. because I talc my tubes and sanding doesn't always remove the talc I do a wipe off with a Clean Streak moistened paper towel. I found this trick a few years ago by experimentation with the various solvents I have about the shop. Clean Streak works very much like "Liquid Buffer" (a fluid that's likely now illegal to sell given the tightening hazardous material laws) did years ago. Then I lay a thin layer of glue and let it dry completely. If the hole is close to a seam or if the seams are prominent I will add a second more goopy layer. Sometimes I reinflate the tube a touch to open up the hole enough to get the glue to pop up at the hole to better aim the patch positioning. The patch gets applied and pressed in well. I generally leave the clear plastic "covering" on for now, set the tube aside for a few minutes. I'll peal off the clear covering carefully as often the edge of the patch wants to also peal up, finger nails help keep the patch edge down. The tube gets just enough air to slightly expand and test it for a day or so. When proven good I'll sprinkle talc on the glued surfaces and the tube is rolled up for the next installation.

Why do I do this when I buy tubes at dealer costs? because one way to reduce the need to recycle is to keep goods in use as long as possible. Besides when I have had friends over to patch their or other's tubes we have a blast (bad pun)

Here's a test for the old guys here. Who can ID the red round patches in the second photo? Andy
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Old 04-22-21, 02:43 PM
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Gotta have a Phil Shot Tube handy. (it technically isn't a glass since it is metal construction) Glad you have luck with patches my patching never seemed to want to work and I really took my time and tried to do it right a few times. Maybe it is my luck.
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Old 04-22-21, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Gotta have a Phil Shot Tube handy. (it technically isn't a glass since it is metal construction) Glad you have luck with patches my patching never seemed to want to work and I really took my time and tried to do it right a few times. Maybe it is my luck.
I suppose the Phil shot thing might be called a vessel and it's a close ended tube. It was filled with Glenfiddich, a Speyside single malt distilled in the hometown of my great great grandfather, Dufftown. A mild scotch with typical flowerly tones.

I'll know tomorrow how many of the 11 patched tubes are no good Andy
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Old 04-22-21, 03:01 PM
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Well, I'll take a guess; Clement? Or Velox??
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Old 04-22-21, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I suppose the Phil shot thing might be called a vessel and it's a close ended tube. It was filled with Glenfiddich, a Speyside single malt distilled in the hometown of my great great grandfather, Dufftown. A mild scotch with typical flowerly tones.

I'll know tomorrow how many of the 11 patched tubes are no good Andy
Glenfiddich is good stuff though scotch and whisky (or whiskey) in general is good. Though I am part Scottish and my Grandmother was way into Scotch so maybe that is why I like it granted I was never old enough to learn to enjoy it while she was alive, that would have been fun.
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Old 04-22-21, 03:08 PM
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Camel patches?
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Old 04-22-21, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I suppose the Phil shot thing might be called a vessel and it's a close ended tube. It was filled with Glenfiddich, a Speyside single malt distilled in the hometown of my great great grandfather, Dufftown. A mild scotch with typical flowerly tones.

I'll know tomorrow how many of the 11 patched tubes are no good Andy
Booze and solvent fumes make a powerful combo; spraying lacquer at the body shop after a beer or two at lunch yielded an interesting buzz.
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Old 04-22-21, 03:33 PM
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I have a similar ritual sans the clean streak. I leave the clear plastic on the patch because I have ruined a good job by removing it once.
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Old 04-22-21, 03:34 PM
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And I don't get nearly that many flats.
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Old 04-22-21, 03:37 PM
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Rima patches: F0 size on box in back. Box of 100 ~$17 or so. I no longer batch these, after realizing about 10 yrs ago
that the # to fix had risen to 17 tubes. The conundrum of tubes with 'no holes' on under water leak test is always
frustrating. In the past I would re-install on an old wheel, pump up to 100# and set it to incubate. If it went down it
was tossed, if not it would be used as potential on-bike spare. Now I just toss them. I always carry two after ~15 yrs ago having a double
flat after side-swiping a curb when a car at a stop sign started to pull out when I was making a L turn. Pulled the
tubes out of the under seat bag and both had holes rubbed in them by loose tools. Tools since then always double
bagged in zip bags and tubes in their zip bags.
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Old 04-22-21, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Here's a test for the old guys here. Who can ID the red round patches in the second photo? Andy
I seem to recall that Velox tubular tire patch kits had patches like that. I liked the Rema patches better, with the feathered edges.
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Old 04-22-21, 05:54 PM
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Bill K,
If those are Camel patches, Andy doesn't have the right self vulcanizing cement for them. I would guess the Monkey Grip patches, but they also require vulcanizing tube cement.
John,
The Velox patches used to have a small extra edge on them that made them look like mini snowmen. I wonder if Andy is just quizzing us? Smiles, MH

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Old 04-22-21, 06:25 PM
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I tend to patch-as-I-go and repair a punctured tube right after it happens so I don't accumulate them. Also, I have concluded patching a hole right on or very near the tube's seam or mold ridge is an exercise in futility so I toss them out of hand.

Andy, re that workbench in the second photo. I don't think I've ever seen a workbench with wall-to-wall carpet.
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Old 04-22-21, 07:21 PM
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The prize goes to joeruge. Velox from many years ago, it's been a LONG time since i patched a sew up.

Un seen is the exhaust fan where the majority of the work was done. The scotch was poured after all were done, although I have been known to have a beer after the thinking part of work has been done before...

The work bench is a metal cart and the towel gives me a quiet surface for late night stuff, the wife goes to bed early often.

I give the flat tire clinics for the local club (or did till good old C19 penetrated our lives) and use the patches for them when teaching how to patch. hence the quantity on hand. I average about 1000 miles per flat. Some years I have had zero flats and other years I've had as many as 6. My yearly mileage has been between 2000 and 5000 since 1978 or there abouts (when I started to keep mileage calendars, still do on paper. For a few years they were Bicycling Mag's then Cats Against the Bomb, these days cheat Staples ones with no theme) averaging about 3000+ for the last decade.

May Pnumo, the god pressure, be under you. Andy
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Old 04-22-21, 07:48 PM
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For micro holes, I've had to hold the tube under water for 20 or 30 seconds before the first tiny bubble showed up. There's always a few surface bubbles clinging to the tube. Wipe them off with fingers, then see if a new bubble eventually reappears!

I had no flats at all in 4500 miles last year! Most years, I might get a sliver puncture and one or two pinch flats. These pinch flats are almost always on good, smooth roads, where I'm not watching carefully enough to see the one sharp cornered rock or metal bit in the road.

Batches
I like to use up a whole tube of glue, instead of trying to keep it after opening, or even after storing unopened for a couple of years. So batch patching works for me, usually 4 or 5 tubes. And it must be more efficient, with everything laid out and the technique repeated on each tube.

My silver sharpie line goes all the way around the tube, and there's a crossed line for a couple of inches along the tube length. Then it doesn't get worn off by sanding.

I like using real sandpaper strips (usually 100 grit) instead of the cheap sandpaper that comes in the patch kit box. And the box itself is a good base for the sanding step -- with the tube stretched a little and pulled down on both sides of the box.

I've clamped the patches overnight with some spring clamps, since I had them, but I don't know if it helps at all.

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Old 04-22-21, 09:59 PM
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Yeah, when I saw all those tubes it reminded me when I used to have 'sew-up' parties - except I was the only one attending! I'd gather four or five tubs and break out the little orange metal box containing all the little goodies; razor blade to cut the stitching, patches, cement, needle, thimble and the little card wrapped with waxed cord.... Ah, the good ole days! Yeah, right. As soon as clincher started getting really good I dumped those damn tubular and have never regretted it.
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Old 04-22-21, 11:07 PM
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I ran sew ups on my commuters till the early 1990s and on my sunday light bikes till the early 2000s. As a life wrench one gets tired of dealing with their own stuff at some point. Andy
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Old 04-23-21, 05:31 AM
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Andy, you mentioned you remove the clear plastic. I stopped removing it during our tours as I would sometimes patch along the road ,if we weren't in a hurry, and just got into the habit of leaving them on.
I powder all our tubes but never thought about the Clean Streak idea!
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Old 04-23-21, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by spelger View Post
And I don't get nearly that many flats.

me neither. And I’m tubeless on my gravel bike which is what I ride most frequently.
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Old 04-23-21, 07:01 AM
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If I have to patch on a seam, I like using the Hozan rim sanding blocks. I find them to be a perfect size and grit for sanding tubes.
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Old 04-23-21, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
If I have to patch on a seam, I like using the Hozan rim sanding blocks. I find them to be a perfect size and grit for sanding tubes.
I’ve occasionally used an X-acto knife or similar to carefully “shave” down a raised seam prior to sanding and patching. I also bought an 8oz tub of glue, with a brush built into the tight-sealing screw top. I found that the little tubes were essentially one-shot deals as they inevitably dried out once they were unsealed. The big container hasn’t evaporated worth a damn in 3-4 years. Only cost ~$6 and will likely last many more years
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Old 04-23-21, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Booze and solvent fumes make a powerful combo; spraying lacquer at the body shop after a beer or two at lunch yielded an interesting buzz.
I didn’t even need the booze. I had a project many years ago that used ethyl acetate to separate pyrolysis oil to different fractions continuously. We had about 15 gallons of ethyl acetate in relatively open vessels in a poorly ventilated room (it was the 90s). About an hour into the process everyone in the room was very, very happy and everything was very, very funny. We were giggling like a bunch of kindergarteners.
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Old 04-23-21, 09:00 AM
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Last April when you couldn’t find a tube for love nor money, I did a “patch party” for my local co-op. My wife and I water tested and marked tubes at the shop since they have an air compressor and then took the tubes home and patched them before folding, size marking, and banding. This is the pile of good tubes.






In all, we patched about 150 tubes of various sizes. None of the volunteers really want to patch tubes so most of these were pre-pandemic.

Personally, I get anywhere from 20 to 50 flats a year. 90% from goatheads. I even got a goathead caused flat in November 2020.
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Old 04-23-21, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Last April when you couldn’t find a tube for love nor money, I did a “patch party” for my local co-op. My wife and I water tested and marked tubes at the shop since they have an air compressor and then took the tubes home and patched them before folding, size marking, and banding. This is the pile of good tubes.






In all, we patched about 150 tubes of various sizes. None of the volunteers really want to patch tubes so most of these were pre-pandemic.

Personally, I get anywhere from 20 to 50 flats a year. 90% from goatheads. I even got a goathead caused flat in November 2020.
why not switch to tubeless? Or do goat heads rip too big a hole? I don’t have goatheads where I ride. At least not enough that I would be made aware if their presence with tons of flats
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Old 04-23-21, 11:03 AM
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Stuart meet Bib. (Bib is Michelin's mascot for those who don't know). Andy
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