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Quite rear hub for road bike

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Quite rear hub for road bike

Old 04-28-21, 06:45 PM
  #1  
edwinchenloo
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Quite rear hub for road bike

Hello,

I'm about to replace a tubular tire and would like to take the opportunity to replace the rear hub of my tri bike. It makes quite some noise while coasting that annoys me a lot. This is a personal preference. I would just like to have a quiet one. So i'm looking for any specific brand and model recommendations for a quiet 10-speed hub, below $350, preferably light-weight. One with ceramic bearings would be sweet too. I tried to search for one but there is a lot of 'noise', lack of data, plus some models are just not readily available.

I would also appreciate a good online store to order such a part. I do help my LBS from time to time but i'm thinking to do the rear hub replacement myself.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-28-21, 07:00 PM
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Do you have a truing stand and knowledge on how to build a wheel? You cannot generally just swap a hub just like that. You need to get the right length spokes and properly build the wheel. If the hub is the same dimensions as the old one maybe it will work a little better but you still need a truing stand and wheel building knowledge. Also a Dishing tool is handy.

If you are looking for a quieter hub you could go for White Industries, the T11s are excellent and I have had mine for years and they are fantastic and made in America. Onyx uses a silent sprague clutch but is going to be a bit more expensive.
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Old 04-28-21, 07:00 PM
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One way to figure this out is to have the wheel in hand and listen as you spin it while restricting the freehub body from spinning too. One man's symphony is another's sick sound. There are some general opinions like Chris King hubs being loud and American Classics not so much. But since it is important I think you should hear before you buy. Andy
The suggestion of a roller clutch is a sound one (bad pun)
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Old 04-28-21, 07:10 PM
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Run some motor oil through the freehub. It will be silent.
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Old 04-28-21, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
Do you have a truing stand and knowledge on how to build a wheel? You cannot generally just swap a hub just like that. You need to get the right length spokes and properly build the wheel. If the hub is the same dimensions as the old one maybe it will work a little better but you still need a truing stand and wheel building knowledge. Also a Dishing tool is handy.
I have watched quite a few videos on lacing plus I'll have the front wheel, which has same the design, available as a reference. I don't have a truing stand but was thinking to improvise using my trainer and something to hold a reference caliper. I'll try to get a hub with the same dimensions and reuse the spokes. I ordered a spoke wrench and even a cheap spoke tension meter. It will be a learning experience for sure. I figure worst case I'll get it laced, close to being perfect, then ask my LBS to do any final adjustments.

Last edited by edwinchenloo; 04-28-21 at 09:20 PM. Reason: incomplete sentence
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Old 04-28-21, 09:27 PM
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Building a wheel is not terribly difficult. Over the years I have built many for myself friends and family. I encourage you to do it. I started out with a book from the library an old fork for a trueing stand and a home made dishing tool I cobbled together from an old aluminum level. Plenty of online vids on how to make or improvise both those things. As for a quiet hub I completely agree with you. The most silent I have found are shinano deores. Rarely can I hear the hub unless theres no wind and im listening for it.
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Old 04-28-21, 09:37 PM
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Ceramic bearings, huh? Why?
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Old 04-28-21, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
Run some motor oil through the freehub. It will be silent.
+1. Light grease may work as well but you'll have to experiment as some freehub pawls may get sluggish and not engage with too thick of a lube. Only way to know is to try and easily reversible if it doesn't work.
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Old 04-28-21, 10:30 PM
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i remember buying a phill wood freewheel grease injector and enjoying the silence, until the pedals started spinning around,
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Old 04-29-21, 01:49 AM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Ceramic bearings, huh? Why?
So while fixing one problem one can plan for another in the future

I have no idea why anyone would choose ceramic bearings outside of racing, but then life is short and full of opportunities.
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Old 04-29-21, 02:02 AM
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Take a look at Onyx Racing Products hubs. These use a sprag clutch instead of a ratchet and pawl system and are absolutely quiet when coasting, and even have virtually no drag as the sprags completely disengage.

They are not cheap though, but perhaps you can find one second hand?

Look up some videos and listen to the sound.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbvNPLsc7fM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDA_vngAI-w&


EDIT: I have also found using a thicker lube like Phil Tenacious Oil on the ratcheting pawls in the freehub body quiets things up a lot.
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Old 04-29-21, 06:34 AM
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IME some hubs are just loud and always will be, no matter what you do. Others are designed intentionally to be quiet.
Ultegra hubs are a good example- 6600/6700 hubs are almost silent, yet super durable.
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Old 04-29-21, 10:36 AM
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Phils tenacious has been my go to for quieting freewheels much cheaper than a new hub
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Old 04-29-21, 12:53 PM
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I have found that shimano hubs are quiet and reliable. I added a stiffer spring in mine to be able to pump grease into them at my service intervals and even then they are not much noisier.
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Old 04-29-21, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by edwinchenloo View Post
I have watched quite a few videos on lacing plus I'll have the front wheel, which has same the design, available as a reference. I don't have a truing stand but was thinking to improvise using my trainer and something to hold a reference caliper. I'll try to get a hub with the same dimensions and reuse the spokes. I ordered a spoke wrench and even a cheap spoke tension meter. It will be a learning experience for sure. I figure worst case I'll get it laced, close to being perfect, then ask my LBS to do any final adjustments.
A proper truing stand will help you greatly. I wouldn't waste time trying to improvise plenty of great to at least decent enough truing stands on the market.
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