Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Rims too tight -- sandpaper them down?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Rims too tight -- sandpaper them down?

Old 05-06-21, 09:21 AM
  #101  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,763

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1547 Post(s)
Liked 736 Times in 462 Posts
For the record, this sounds like a bad idea to me. But this is even more concerning:

Originally Posted by jesnow View Post
I'm thinking that I'll remove so little material it won't even be detectable on a truing stand. Maybe one with a gauge. If I even make it to 0.2 mm material removed without solving the problem I'll stop and declare failure and reap all the "I told you so"'s in this group.

I'm also thinking I don't need to remove material all the way around. Just the critical part where the bead is when you're squeezing it on the last bit on one side. If that's more than 15cm of circumference I'd be really surprised. I tried out measuring thickness of the whole rim, carbon fairing and all, and it's surprisingly consistent, 60.04+/-2mm everywhere I measured. So if I measure at several points in the area I'm sanding, and go slowly, I can control the amount sanded pretty carefully, and keep material removed to a minimum.

That means of course there will only be one place on the rim I can put the tire on, and only on one side, but I can live with that. I'll put a sticker of some kind on it so I can find it.
When I get down to less than 1 mm of tire bead overhanging the rim, I'm done. One more push and it's on. It's when I've got 3-5 mm of overhang that I have problems.

And you're planning to create a local dip in one part of the rim, instead of a uniform reduction in the rim's diameter? Capt. Murphy of Murphy's Law is waiting to be called into action.

If, despite all the warnings you'll have to ignore, you decide to do this, please do report back after a few weeks' rides to let us know how it works. And if serious injury resulted.
pdlamb is online now  
Likes For pdlamb:
Old 05-06-21, 09:31 AM
  #102  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,670

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 737 Post(s)
Liked 890 Times in 511 Posts
Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
Carbon with aluminum brake track. As I understand it, sanding will only be done on the aluminum.



OP already admitted to learning stuff in this thread. You can stop it with the 'Know It All' pile on any time now.

jesnow I applaud you for sticking with the thread and agreeing to show us your results win or lose. You are stronger than many of us.
There is no such thing. It's an aluminum rim w/ a carbon aero section or fairing bonded to the rim.
cxwrench is online now  
Old 05-06-21, 09:35 AM
  #103  
AlmostTrick
Tortoise Wins by a Hare!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Looney Tunes, IL
Posts: 7,352

Bikes: Wabi Special FG, Raleigh Roper, Nashbar AL-1, Miyata One Hundred, '70 Schwinn Lemonator and More!!

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1519 Post(s)
Liked 876 Times in 470 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
There is no such thing. It's an aluminum rim w/ a carbon aero section or fairing bonded to the rim.
Ah, got it! Thanks for the correction.
AlmostTrick is offline  
Old 05-06-21, 11:17 AM
  #104  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,022

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 548 Post(s)
Liked 362 Times in 275 Posts
Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
Hahaha... I can't tell if this is a parody of "As the World Turns" or "As the Stomach Turns"!
Either way...


thook is offline  
Likes For thook:
Old 05-06-21, 11:39 AM
  #105  
thook
(rhymes with spook)
 
thook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winslow, AR
Posts: 2,022

Bikes: '83 univega gran turismo x2, '85 schwinn super le tour,'89 miyata triple cross, '91 GT tequesta, '90 yokota grizzly peak, '94 GT backwoods, '95'ish scott tampico, '98 bonty privateer, '93 mongoose crossway 625, '98 parkpre ariel, 2k'ish giant fcr3

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 548 Post(s)
Liked 362 Times in 275 Posts
i just wanna say if the wheel blows up and you crack your skull or get killed....pics or didn't happen
thook is offline  
Old 05-06-21, 03:43 PM
  #106  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,145
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 607 Post(s)
Liked 537 Times in 323 Posts
Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
I don't have experience doing this but done carefully and cleanly I don't see how your proposal would cause any safety issues. And you certainly don't deserve any scorn for thinking outside the box or asking for answers to a specific question.

Let us know how it goes.
The only scorn has been based on the fact the OP asked a question, then got upset when he got answers that didn't fit his predetermined answer.
phughes is offline  
Likes For phughes:
Old 05-07-21, 08:14 PM
  #107  
shelbyfv 
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 8,395
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2267 Post(s)
Liked 2,207 Times in 1,198 Posts
Tire

Posting this for OP and anyone else who has trouble mounting tires. Specialized Turbo Cotton- the easiest tire to get on and off a rim I have ever encountered. Fixed a flat for a friend and I probably could have pulled the bead off w/o a lever. Was able to mount the tire with only the slightest thumb pressure. So easy I might have been concerned but these were OE on a new S works, I guess Specialized knows what they are doing. Just a bit of info for anyone with a problem combo.


https://www.specialized.com/us/en/tu...ext=00015-1503

Last edited by shelbyfv; 05-08-21 at 05:47 AM.
shelbyfv is online now  
Old 05-07-21, 09:38 PM
  #108  
goldfinch
Senior Member
 
goldfinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minnesota/Arizona and between
Posts: 4,037

Bikes: Trek Madone 4.7 WSD, 1969 Schwinn Collegiate, Surly Long Haul Trucker, Terry Classic, Serotta Classique, Giant Liv

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Look at the risks. Look at the benefits. If something went wrong it could go very wrong, with a tire off the rim at speed. Probability of that happening is unknown but people have laid out reasons why it might, The benefit is less time and aggravation in tire changes. Doesn't justify the potential risk.

I'd get new rims.

I'd like to see a thread with all the tips and tricks. I still use baby powder and a tire jack.
goldfinch is offline  
Old 05-08-21, 05:09 AM
  #109  
Bimmer69
Senior Member
 
Bimmer69's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 64
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
Hahaha... I can't tell if this is a parody of "As the World Turns" or "As the Stomach Turns"!
Either way...
more like ďAs the Rim TurnsĒ lol.

op not sure how much you would gain by removing such a small amount of the diameter. Also how would you do it evenly?
Bimmer69 is offline  
Old 05-08-21, 09:43 AM
  #110  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 14,932

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2927 Post(s)
Liked 1,206 Times in 846 Posts
Originally Posted by superdex View Post
Don't sand.

Get out your spoke wrench and tighten everything 2 turns. Poof, you've shrunk your radius. You're welcome.
To do this by spoke tension only one has to compress the rim to a smaller circumference. The materials that rims are made of are VERY reluctant to compress without serious forces, think the efforts to forge crank arms as example. Spokes and nipples will fail long before this lever of force can be applied. What will happen is that the spokes will stretch, localized deformation will happen at the spoke holes in the rims (and pull through or crack in time) and maybe the hub flange will fracture.

Of course since I am sometimes clueless about forum posting indications of sarcasm superdex might be trying to make a "joke". Too bad it's advise can lead to more damage then benefit. But if the OP did follow this bad advise and did ruin their rim/wheel and had to replace them/it the new wheel/rim might turn out to be easier to mount a tire to Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Likes For Andrew R Stewart:
Old 05-09-21, 11:32 AM
  #111  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,625

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Liked 132 Times in 101 Posts
Not surprised, I have a set of Dura Ace WH-7850-C24-CL, carbon clincher/ tubeless wheels which have aluminum tracks formerly with gatorskins and with the arthritis in my hands found them impossible w/o at least one metal lever to remove and to install a Kool Stop Tire Bead Jack. I now swap out easier mounting tires that have lots of miles on them from other wheelsets and life is good. Don't like sanding, even if well executed you might find out what could go wrong when they were easier to mount.

Last edited by easyupbug; 05-09-21 at 11:36 AM.
easyupbug is offline  
Old 05-10-21, 09:44 AM
  #112  
superdex
staring at the mountains
 
superdex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Castle Pines, CO
Posts: 4,434

Bikes: Fairdale Goodship, Spesh Crux, Salsa Timberjack 29

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 335 Post(s)
Liked 106 Times in 69 Posts
Okay, it's Monday. I feel like I'm waiting on election results.... How'd it go?
superdex is offline  
Likes For superdex:
Old 05-10-21, 12:14 PM
  #113  
Tim Dunn
Old Time newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Ohio
Posts: 5

Bikes: Colnago, Raleigh International, my home built touring frame from 1977, Seven, Hispano France Pista, couple others..

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
No.

Replace the wheels or rims.
Tim Dunn is offline  
Old 05-10-21, 12:21 PM
  #114  
icemilkcoffee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 367 Post(s)
Liked 268 Times in 169 Posts
Originally Posted by superdex View Post
Okay, it's Monday. I feel like I'm waiting on election results.... How'd it go?
No news is ..... bad news?
icemilkcoffee is online now  
Old 05-10-21, 12:43 PM
  #115  
Crankstank 
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Seattle
Posts: 34

Bikes: 2008 Rodriguez Adventure, 1995 TiCycles, 1995 KHS Montana Pro Custom, 2012 Surly Troll, 1976 Azuki Gran Sport Custom Frankenbike, 1974 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 1976 Schwinn Superior, 1989 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 15 Posts
Kevlar (folding bead) tires are always tighter, at least the first few times, than wire bead. So maybe go to a wire bead tire. Or a different brand. I know some older rims were notorious (matrix titan on the old Treks!) for being larger diameter than average.
Crankstank is offline  
Old 05-10-21, 01:09 PM
  #116  
RustedRoot
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Jon, being imperious and condescending will deservedly get you snarky replies. Here's another: If you know all the tricks you would not ask the question, the answer to which is obvious. Pray, tell, what is it?

Perhaps you might rephrase your question.
RustedRoot is offline  
Likes For RustedRoot:
Old 05-10-21, 01:10 PM
  #117  
AlanO
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Since you donít want the trick Iíll just say no.
AlanO is offline  
Likes For AlanO:
Old 05-10-21, 03:20 PM
  #118  
Jbarcs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Posts: 76

Bikes: 2013 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 2007 Specialized S-Works Tricross, 2010 Specialized Tricross Triple, 2016 Specialized AWOL EVO

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by jesnow View Post
I'm thinking that I'll remove so little material it won't even be detectable on a truing stand. Maybe one with a gauge. If I even make it to 0.2 mm material removed without solving the problem I'll stop and declare failure and reap all the "I told you so"'s in this group.

If that's more than 15cm of circumference I'd be really surprised. I tried out measuring thickness of the whole rim, carbon fairing and all, and it's surprisingly consistent, 60.04+/-2mm everywhere I measured. So if I measure at several points in the area I'm sanding, and go slowly, I can control the amount sanded pretty carefully, and keep material removed to a minimum.

That means of course there will only be one place on the rim I can put the tire on, and only on one side, but I can live with that. I'll put a sticker of some kind on it so I can find it.
This gets weirder every time I read it. I thought it a bad idea but figured I'd be entertained reading the "why it's a bad idea" posts. Then I learned about the KoolStop Jack and learned something valuable... a thumbs up for Bike Forums. But now back here in the sturm und drang of this bizarre thread I learn that you actually want to sand your rim out of round... but only on one side and just where it "gets tight."

Crom help us.
Jbarcs is offline  
Likes For Jbarcs:
Old 05-11-21, 07:52 AM
  #119  
WinterCommuter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: St Paul, MN
Posts: 73

Bikes: 2014 Trek Farley, 1993 Gary Fisher Paragon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by jesnow View Post
I have some new rims that are super tight with my preferred tires. I'm very experienced, and still broke two tire levers getting them on there (which I ultimately did). The tires aren't tight on any of my other wheels. I think it's the tubeless-ready idea biting me in the ass. Manufacturers are deliberately making them tight by adding a tiny amount to the circumference of the rim. But I'll *never* get those things on out on a ride! It doesn't matter what tricks there are in the shop to mount a tire if you're screwed from the get go on a ride in the middle of nowhere. I have to be able to get the thing mounted in seconds not hours.

My question: Has anybody ever sanded down the outside of the rim? Wet/dry sandpaper, 100 grit will take them right down, then 600 grit to smooth them. Aluminum is soft, WC wet/dry sandpaper is hard, this will work very quickly. People regularly sand out ding marks and such. But I've never heard of anybody sanding down a rim to improve tubeful tire fit in "tubeless-ready" rims.

Has anybody ever tried it?

Please do *not* reply to this thread with other advice for getting tires onto the rim, I'm asking a very specific question. I know *all* the tricks already thank you. This is maybe a new one.

Cheers,

Jon.
nope. Never heard of it.

i have several carbon and alloy road rims that are made in china. They are all tubeless ready, but i havenít gone tubeless on any of my road wheels. i use tubeless rim tape on all of my road wheels. These wheels are all exceptionally difficult to mount with new tires. So, i know your pain, but my bag of tricks has always gotten the tires on/off eventuallyóin the garage or on the road. So, you must be dealing with a whole different beast. Even so, Iíve never considered sanding or milling the rims and iím certain that i never will. If it came to considering sanding down an otherwise perfect set of rims, iíd buy a different set of rims and have the new ones built up.

Just my 2 cents.
WinterCommuter is offline  
Old 05-12-21, 04:31 AM
  #120  
gotrek99
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Steel Core Tire Levers and soapy water.

They make tire levers with a steel core and they are the best solution for putting on tight tires at home along with a little soapy water on the bead. The levers alleviate the worry of getting the tire off in the event of a road flat. A bead tool works when you are at home.
gotrek99 is offline  
Old 05-12-21, 05:45 AM
  #121  
Dsprok
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 250

Bikes: Hybrid and Folding

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
If you must marry that particular tire to that rim.....sitting down? Put the rim in a freezer put the tire in hot sun wait a couple hours and 'git it done'
Dsprok is offline  
Old 05-12-21, 06:17 AM
  #122  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 3,382

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 941 Post(s)
Liked 743 Times in 504 Posts
Originally Posted by Dsprok View Post
If you must marry that particular tire to that rim.....sitting down? Put the rim in a freezer put the tire in hot sun wait a couple hours and 'git it done'
You must have a pretty large freezer.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Likes For 70sSanO:
Old 05-12-21, 06:29 AM
  #123  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,705

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1626 Post(s)
Liked 1,226 Times in 810 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
You must have a pretty large freezer.

John
I can fit a couple deer in mine. Chest freezers are "a thing" for many.
dedhed is online now  
Old 05-12-21, 02:27 PM
  #124  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,670

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 737 Post(s)
Liked 890 Times in 511 Posts
Originally Posted by Dsprok View Post
If you must marry that particular tire to that rim.....sitting down? Put the rim in a freezer put the tire in hot sun wait a couple hours and 'git it done'
Carbon doesn't have the rate of thermal expansion/contraction you think it does. Not even close. It's one of the lowest of any material in the world.
cxwrench is online now  
Likes For cxwrench:
Old 05-12-21, 02:49 PM
  #125  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 3,382

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 941 Post(s)
Liked 743 Times in 504 Posts
I think that somewhere in this thread the OP states that he is able to mount the tire, although it is very difficult.

His concern is not mounting it at home, but have to fix a flat on the road and struggling with it in that environment.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Likes For 70sSanO:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.