Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Do I need to replace my chain with my cassette?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Do I need to replace my chain with my cassette?

Old 05-07-21, 08:53 AM
  #1  
djdelarosa25
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Do I need to replace my chain with my cassette?

Just swapped out my 11-34T cassette with an 11-28T because the jumps were pretty big on an 8-speed. I've read that I should be changing my chain, too, as it could quickly wear out my new cassette. My chain is around 2000 km old. Is this necessary?
djdelarosa25 is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 08:56 AM
  #2  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 740 Post(s)
Liked 893 Times in 513 Posts
Depends on how worn your chain is.
cxwrench is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 09:04 AM
  #3  
deacon mark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,775

Bikes: Habanero Titanium Team Nuevo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 76 Posts
I doubt it based the mileage it can happen if the chain is too far stretched for a length of time. Frankly put a new chain on the bike and if it does not skip you are good to go. If it skips you need a new cassette but I highly doubt it.
deacon mark is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 09:49 AM
  #4  
MudPie
Senior Member
 
MudPie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,033
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 33 Posts
Although it might not be necessary, but since you have a new cassette, I would put on a new chain, too. Might as well start with a fresh set of cassette and chain.

As mentioned, as chains wear over time, they tend to "stretch" such that they no longer match the cogs of the cassette, and skipping occurs when pedaling with power. Your old chain may or may not be "stretched" to cause this condition. You can measure the length of your current chain (12 links should equal 12" exactly) or just pedal around and see if the chain skips. If it doesn't skip, then you should be fine.

However, I put on a new chain when replacing a cassette. More of a peace-of-mind thing for me.
MudPie is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 10:49 AM
  #5  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 7,156

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2789 Post(s)
Liked 1,418 Times in 1,035 Posts

Do I need to replace my chain with my cassette


I think you should replace your chain with a chain. <grin>
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 05-07-21, 10:53 AM
  #6  
urbanknight
Over the hill
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 22,702

Bikes: Specialized Allez Elite, Raleigh Pursuit tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 116 Times in 71 Posts
I believe the conventional wisdom is that if you have a worn cassette, it will have worn your chain as well. If you're changing a perfectly good cassette just to get different gearing, that's not the same reason. Racers swap wheels with different cassettes back and forth regularly. Some people have a different wheel with its own cassette for the stationary trainer. Others will change cassettes for the different terrain they are about to ride in. Never heard any of them claim it wore the chain more quickly.
__________________
It's like riding a bicycle
urbanknight is online now  
Likes For urbanknight:
Old 05-07-21, 11:19 AM
  #7  
oldbobcat
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 3,397

Bikes: '79 Gios, '80 Masi, '06 Felt, early '60s Frejus

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 143 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 77 Posts
Generally, my friends and I get a cassette to last through two chains.
oldbobcat is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 11:31 AM
  #8  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,055

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1333 Post(s)
Liked 821 Times in 574 Posts
Originally Posted by urbanknight View Post
I believe the conventional wisdom is that if you have a worn cassette, it will have worn your chain as well. If you're changing a perfectly good cassette just to get different gearing, that's not the same reason. Racers swap wheels with different cassettes back and forth regularly. Some people have a different wheel with its own cassette for the stationary trainer. Others will change cassettes for the different terrain they are about to ride in. Never heard any of them claim it wore the chain more quickly.
Some people keep a chain and a cassette together as a set.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 05-07-21, 11:37 AM
  #9  
urbanknight
Over the hill
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 22,702

Bikes: Specialized Allez Elite, Raleigh Pursuit tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 116 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Some people keep a chain and a cassette together as a set.
I've heard of that, but is there documentation of that doing anything good? Maybe it's because I grew up racing in a time when you had to push a little (easily lost) pin just right in order to change chains, but it seems like a hassle to do that unless there were some serious wear problems if you didn't.
__________________
It's like riding a bicycle
urbanknight is online now  
Old 05-07-21, 11:39 AM
  #10  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,055

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1333 Post(s)
Liked 821 Times in 574 Posts
Originally Posted by urbanknight View Post
I've heard of that, but is there documentation of that doing anything good? Maybe it's because I grew up racing in a time when you had to push a little (easily lost) pin just right in order to change chains, but it seems like a hassle to do that unless there were some serious wear problems if you didn't.
It is trivial to do this with a quick link.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Likes For dsbrantjr:
Old 05-07-21, 11:41 AM
  #11  
HillRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 32,806

Bikes: '96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '20 Surly Midnight Special, All are 3x10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1649 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 504 Times in 381 Posts
Originally Posted by deacon mark View Post
I doubt it based the mileage it can happen if the chain is too far stretched for a length of time. Frankly put a new chain on the bike and if it does not skip you are good to go. If it skips you need a new cassette but I highly doubt it.
You answered the opposite of the OP's question. He has a new cassette and wants to know if he should replace the old chain. You recommended replacing an old cassette if he fitted a new chain.

Anyway, I agree that a new chain with the new cassette is a good idea. Start fresh as the cost isn't that much.
HillRider is online now  
Old 05-07-21, 12:36 PM
  #12  
deacon mark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,775

Bikes: Habanero Titanium Team Nuevo

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
You answered the opposite of the OP's question. He has a new cassette and wants to know if he should replace the old chain. You recommended replacing an old cassette if he fitted a new chain.

Anyway, I agree that a new chain with the new cassette is a good idea. Start fresh as the cost isn't that much.
My bad and your advice fine but personally if it was me and the chain did not skip I would not replace it. Frankly I use shimano cassettes and they have gone way up in price and are harder to find now. I would like to have an 11-32 but they are expensive compared to pre covid.
deacon mark is offline  
Old 05-08-21, 07:21 AM
  #13  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 7,009

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3694 Post(s)
Liked 831 Times in 556 Posts
Chains are consumables, so feel free to also put a new chain on, but keep the not-old old chain perhaps for the next time you need a 'new' chain.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 05-08-21, 10:11 AM
  #14  
DiabloScott
It's MY mountain
 
DiabloScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mt.Diablo
Posts: 9,208

Bikes: Klein, Merckx, Trek

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2863 Post(s)
Liked 792 Times in 466 Posts
A new cassette will not damage a used chain.
Shifting might not be quite as good as putting on a new chain though... that's kind of always true.
DiabloScott is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.