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Removing a damaged freewheel

Old 05-08-21, 02:01 PM
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Removing a damaged freewheel

Asked to clean up a Favorit brand bike, a Czechoslovakian 5-speed, mixte. I'll post photos of full bike later but shocked to find out it's an '80's bike. Cottered cranks brand new in the '80's!! Wow! When I saw it I assumed couldn't be newer than about 1975.

Anyway it has some cool parts, all marked Favorit, including RD, stem , brakes and levers, and shifter. As a quirk, stem bolt is 11mm.

Ex: RD



Then there was this fine freewheel. I hit it with PB Blaster and left soak for an hour then tried with the freewheel tool locked down.

Snap! Oh, oh. Usually I see the tool get damaged, not the freewheel.

Damage at about the 10 O'clock position, under the name"Velo".



The rear wheel hub isn't bad (as old wheels go) and would be rebuildable with new bearing and grease, assuming I have another English/ISO: 1.370" x 24 freewheel. I would like to save the freewheel as even damaged it looks cool.

Anybody have an idea how/if the freewheel be removed with being totally destructive???

Edit: 2nd question, If i unscrewed the ring using a punch, could the outer moverf over to another freewheel body?

Last edited by WGB; 05-08-21 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 05-08-21, 06:14 PM
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At this point one could try a huge Easy Out after removing the axle. This would save the freewheel but WHY would anyone thread it back onto a wheel when they won't remove it easily again is anyone's guess. I suggest you take this as a learning moment and not reuse the freewheel. So do spin off the threaded race, it's a left hand thread BTW. dump all the balls and such and place a good old pipe wrench on the remaining core and spin it off the hub.

I seriously doubt that the freewheel outer core and/or the cogs will transfer over to another brand. Andy
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Old 05-08-21, 08:11 PM
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https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair...uctive-removal


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Old 05-09-21, 08:02 AM
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Ok, thanks all - Not sure why but Internet wasn't working and didn't see any updates to my thread, until this morning. Was just hoping for a magical way to save the freewheel but should've realized if there was a magical way, we wouldn't need freewheel tools.

I'll spin off the locking ring and toss the bearings and put the remainder of the freewheel into a box in the garage. Doubt if I'll ever find a worn Favorit freewheel that I can switch this one onto the body but you never know. I'll use the wrench method to take off the freewheel hub body, thanks all
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Old 05-09-21, 10:52 AM
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If you have a friend with an arc welder, building up the sheared off corners would be a matter of minutes. And should be doable w/o getting too much heat into sensitive parts of the f/w. That’d give you another chance of using a f/w tool to spin it off.
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Old 05-09-21, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
...take this as a learning moment and not reuse the freewheel.
RATS! - I know that feeling when the thing you are trying to preserve offers a SNAP...

That Freewheel looked like a real beauty...
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Old 05-09-21, 12:50 PM
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1: If, as appears to be the case, you removed the axle and bearings before attempting to use the freewheel tool---don't. Correct use of the tool requires the tool to be centered precisely, which in turn requires the axle to be left in situ.

2: Most people who think that they've, as you said, "locked down" the freewheel tool haven't locked it down with sufficient force. The tool should be held in place with the quick release skewer (or axle nut) adjusted as tight as it would be to secure the wheel in the dropouts. Once you've done than and then applied enough twisting force to break the freewheel body free of the hub threads, loosen the skewer or axle nut a quarter-turn or so and turn the wheel a bit farther. Repeat the last two steps once or twice, and the freewheel will come off the hub with no drama. (Novice mechanics in shops that I ran would sometimes argue against using so much force to hold the freewheel tool in place. After they broke their first freewheel tool, they'd generally listen to reason.)
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Old 05-09-21, 06:52 PM
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Trakhak Good guess on the removal of axle. Just tired and hadn't slept. But, now I'm there. I'll disassemble freewheel and take off the body and lesson learned. Might see if the wheel will build back up first, I removed the axle by stripping down from the NDS. Getting grease in that deep in beneath the freewheel body might be tricky as don't have a grease gun. It's not like its worth much anyway so might play with it tomorrow if I have time

dabac No access to a welder
zandoval I know, sad to see it like this s it's kind of an oddity.

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Old 05-09-21, 07:03 PM
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One could try to reestablish nice square tool removing notches on the FW core, after removal, with a Dremel tool. We had to do that a few times so long ago I had forgotten. Didn't work too well for us... Andy
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Old 05-09-21, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
One could try to reestablish nice square tool removing notches on the FW core, after removal, with a Dremel tool. We had to do that a few times so long ago I had forgotten. Didn't work too well for us... Andy
I dimly remember grabbing a wheel away from a cub mechanic who had left a Regina or Suntour freewheel with, for want of a better term, "smeared" notches; after cranking the QR skewer down on the freewheel tool as hard as I was able to, I gave it some wellie, and the tool cut square notches, snowplow style, that were sufficiently robust to get the freewheel off.
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Old 05-11-21, 08:36 AM
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I would dismantle per Mr Stewart’s method BUT do so carefully to not lose any parts or cause further damage i.e. be careful with the pipe wrench . Also, I would keep the bearings from the outer race separate from those from the inner race in order to know the number and size if needed to rebuild. RE: not using that freewheel due to not being able to remove it in the future, I don’t think that it would be terribly difficult to “cut/mill” new notches for the removal tool ~90 degrees from the original, damaged ones . Perhaps Mr Stewart could elaborate on why this might not be a good idea? That outer race “cone” looks suspiciously like the one on a vintage French “Cyclo” freewheel that I’m currently rebuilding (Czechoslovakian knock-off ?) Depending on how the internal races look, rebuilding is definitely possible and you’d retain the OEM configuration

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Old 05-11-21, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by sovende View Post
I would dismantle per Mr Stewart’s method BUT do so carefully to not lose any parts or cause further damage i.e. be careful with the pipe wrench . Also, I would keep the bearings from the outer race separate from those from the inner race in order to know the number and size if needed to rebuild. RE: not using that freewheel due to not being able to remove it in the future, I don’t think that it would be terribly difficult to “cut/mill” new notches for the removal tool ~90 degrees from the original, damaged ones . Perhaps Mr Stewart could elaborate on why this might not be a good idea? That outer race “cone” looks suspiciously like the one on a vintage French “Cyclo” freewheel that I’m currently rebuilding (Czechoslovakian knock-off ?) Depending on how the internal races look, rebuilding is definitely possible and you’d retain the OEM configuration
My post was a short version of what I might do myself. Many who does this kind of stuff would consider what you suggest, saving parts and going back to see if they can be fixed/reused. I have a mill and would not consider using it to recreate removing tool notches, a simple hand held Dremel or die grinder will do just fine. My suggestion to not reinstall the freewheel is because I don't know the skills of the OP and once burned twice shy I think is a prudent plan. For the cost of a replacement (used Euro freewheels are not too hard to find on Ebay and new are even more plentiful) the risk of a repaired freewheel again not being straight forward to remove can completely be avoided. Unless this bike was to be a show piece/wall hanger I suggest moving on from the OEM freewheel.

BTW I suggest this for the OP's other thread question finding a tool for his peg hole fitting on the headset top nut. Unless the bike is somehow worth keeping OEM replace the top nut with a common design that uses easy to use tools that are likely already at hand. Andy
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Old 05-12-21, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
My post was a short version of what I might do myself. Many who does this kind of stuff would consider what you suggest, saving parts and going back to see if they can be fixed/reused. I have a mill and would not consider using it to recreate removing tool notches, a simple hand held Dremel or die grinder will do just fine. My suggestion to not reinstall the freewheel is because I don't know the skills of the OP and once burned twice shy I think is a prudent plan. For the cost of a replacement (used Euro freewheels are not too hard to find on Ebay and new are even more plentiful) the risk of a repaired freewheel again not being straight forward to remove can completely be avoided. Unless this bike was to be a show piece/wall hanger I suggest moving on from the OEM freewheel.

BTW I suggest this for the OP's other thread question finding a tool for his peg hole fitting on the headset top nut. Unless the bike is somehow worth keeping OEM replace the top nut with a common design that uses easy to use tools that are likely already at hand. Andy
While I do agree with what you are saying being the “best” approach, the OP did indicate that he wished to use the OEM freewheel! With that in mind, I would, with regard to that aspect alone, refurb that freewheel! The OP has little to lose except his time (and perhaps a few ball bearings ) and everything to gain! Once the cog (outer body) is removed from the inner body of the freewheel could then be easily removed from the hub. The notches for the removal tool would be easier to “cut” by any chosen method. If it is found that the bearing races are pitted beyond a reasonable amount (he’s not rebuilding a finely tuned racing bike), then yes, seek out a suitable replacement but until then, have some fun and get some experience where many fear to tread .
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