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Unior Cassette Lockring Tool A Dud For Me...

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Unior Cassette Lockring Tool A Dud For Me...

Old 05-10-21, 08:05 PM
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Papa Tom
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Unior Cassette Lockring Tool A Dud For Me...

I was excited to own this cool-looking little tool, but during my first attempt at using it, I ruined all the teeth, scuffed up the plastic frame protector, and threw my back out.

There is nothing "wrong" with my cassette, which comes off very easily with my handheld cassette remover, and I watched several videos to make sure I used the Unior gadget correctly. Essentially, the Unior did nothing but slip out of my cassette and dangle between the outer ring and my frame every time I tried to get it into position. When I finally got it to stay and attempted to turn the crank, the entire tool just got eaten alive and the lockring never released.

The company that sold it to me has not been very swift in replying to my e-mail about this experience, so I assume they are going to try to avoid having to take it back. Unwilling to throw it away, I'm hoping someone can suggest another use for it?
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Old 05-10-21, 08:25 PM
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So a copy/paste and search shows me two different tools with Unior Cassette" in their name. One looks to be very much like the dirt common Shimano lock ring tool with pilot. The other is to hold the cassette from turning during the lock ring loosening, much like a chain whip.

Which are you posting about, or is your tool another design altogether. Your description almost sounds like a travel lock ring remover like this Stein "Hypercracker" Mini Lock Ring Tool from Harris Cyclery (sheldonbrown.com)

Lacking a better description I can't give specific advice except to say that I suspect your method of using the tool wasn't correct. Andy
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Old 05-10-21, 10:52 PM
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I think you are talking about the emergency cassette removal tool.

It is an interesting concept, but it looks like it will only work if the lockring to dropout gap causes for the tool to be wedged tightly to the lockring. The splines do not look like they are deep enough to stay engaged.

Even with a standard lockring tool, some freehub bodies do not allow for the standard tool to sit deep enough. With a shallow engagement, I really have to be careful to keep pressure on the breaker bar to keep the tool from lifting out. If it does, it can tear up the splines, which sounds like what happened.

I guess you can still use it as a one size spoke wrench.

John
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Old 05-11-21, 11:16 AM
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Why would I ever need an "emergency cassette removal tool" ? Like, short of a cross-county touring expedition, I don't understand what situation would make this part of an on-the-road-mid-ride repair.
"911 - what is the emergency?"
"ah, it's my cassette.."
"name and location please"
"BNBB, and I'm on the side of Route 129 at Bonehead Drive"
"and you said there's a problem with your ass-head?"
"no, my cassette."
"your tape player, Sir?"
"no, my cassette, on my bike. it's an emergency"
"you've been in a bike accident and hurt your ass-head?"
"no it's my gears."
"you have an emergency with your ears? Are you bleeding?"
"no, the gears on my bike. it's an emergency and I have to remove my cassette right now, and my emergency cassette remover is failing."
"Sir, do you require the police or an ambulance?"
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Old 05-11-21, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by blacknbluebikes View Post
Why would I ever need an "emergency cassette removal tool" ? Like, short of a cross-county touring expedition, I don't understand what situation would make this part of an on-the-road-mid-ride repair.
Broken spoke on the drive side on even a short multi-day ride IF you happen to be carrying a spare spoke or just need to get the broken one out of the way.
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Old 05-11-21, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
So a copy/paste and search shows me two different tools with Unior Cassette" in their name. One looks to be very much like the dirt common Shimano lock ring tool with pilot. The other is to hold the cassette from turning during the lock ring loosening, much like a chain whip.

Which are you posting about, or is your tool another design altogether. Your description almost sounds like a travel lock ring remover like this Stein "Hypercracker" Mini Lock Ring Tool from Harris Cyclery (sheldonbrown.com)

Lacking a better description I can't give specific advice except to say that I suspect your method of using the tool wasn't correct. Andy
It's THIS one:
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Old 05-11-21, 04:47 PM
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And by the way, the company that sold me the tool contacted me today and agreed to take the tool back for a full refund. Without even my description of the failed attempt, they knew right away that it doesn't always work. They even mentioned the shallow teeth and the very thin diameter. This chapter is closed.

Thanks, to some of you, for the sarcasm, though. It always serves to remind me why I've stopped posting here as much as I used to.
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Old 05-11-21, 05:26 PM
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I carry this little guy in my adventure/touring kit. You will have to get creative with your chain to make the chain-whip, but it will work in a pinch. Nice, deep teeth and compact size.

https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...2&category=221
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Old 05-11-21, 06:53 PM
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Papa Tom- I, too, have been too sarcastic at times. It's way too easy to hit post without counting to ten, or maybe twenty... Sometimes it's a battle to be compassionate when one feels the obvious is not seen. In my case this was the case as I couldn't easily find the tool you were talking about (although I did suspect what it was).

Your situation is one that I deal with routinely. A customer wanting a tool to do a job and thinking a emergency version will work well. I usually advise that unless they going to carry that tool on their bike only, for some on the road use, they would be better served with a stay at home version. (The classic examples are multi tools with sub par hex wrenches and inadequate chain tools). The priority of packaging and weight take away the ease of use and robust function.

I'm glad the seller is willing to back up their transaction with the offer of return. And don't feel that you have to leave this forum completely. Andy
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Old 05-12-21, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
I carry this little guy in my adventure/touring kit. You will have to get creative with your chain to make the chain-whip, but it will work in a pinch. Nice, deep teeth and compact size.

https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...2&category=221
At first glance, I can't figure out how it works, but I will YouTube it. Thanks!
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Old 05-12-21, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Papa Tom- I, too, have been too sarcastic at times. It's way too easy to hit post without counting to ten, or maybe twenty... Sometimes it's a battle to be compassionate when one feels the obvious is not seen. In my case this was the case as I couldn't easily find the tool you were talking about (although I did suspect what it was).

Your situation is one that I deal with routinely. A customer wanting a tool to do a job and thinking a emergency version will work well. I usually advise that unless they going to carry that tool on their bike only, for some on the road use, they would be better served with a stay at home version. (The classic examples are multi tools with sub par hex wrenches and inadequate chain tools). The priority of packaging and weight take away the ease of use and robust function.

I'm glad the seller is willing to back up their transaction with the offer of return. And don't feel that you have to leave this forum completely. Andy
I had no intention of making this my primary cassette removal tool. I have the proper shop tools for this job and I use them often.

The Unior was meant to be an alternative to my FibreFix kit when I am out on one of my so-called "tours" and I pop a spoke, which, on the rare occasions that it happens, is always on the business side of the wheel. I have never used the FibreFix and, thus, don't have full faith in it yet. The Unior was cheap enough and seemed a more feasible solution.
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Old 05-12-21, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Papa Tom View Post
The Unior was meant to be an alternative to my FibreFix kit when I am out on one of my so-called "tours" and I pop a spoke, which, on the rare occasions that it happens, is always on the business side of the wheel. I have never used the FibreFix and, thus, don't have full faith in it yet.
Originally Posted by Papa Tom View Post
Thanks, to some of you, for the sarcasm, though. It always serves to remind me why I've stopped posting here as much as I used to.
I'm sure I'm high on your "sarcastic bastid" list, but here goes.........

Have faith in the FibreFix, they can work very well. It's important to get the "string" as absolutely tight as humanly possible before even beginning the tightening of the nipple to bring it up to tension. One of them got us completely through a 4 day circumnavigation of the Finger Lakes on the rear wheel of a tandem, where spokes live a hard life. Now that I think of it I remember using one on my solo tourer as well. A PIA for sure but will get you home.
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