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Favorite multi-tool?

Old 06-14-21, 03:32 AM
  #26  
Lazyass
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I've had a Crank Bros for well over 10 years. The chain breaker works so good that it's the only one I use at home.

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Old 06-14-21, 06:27 AM
  #27  
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I've run the gamut with multi-tools and such over the years. My favorite right now, for everyday riding, is the Crank Bros tool. I don't see a need for a chain tool when I'm out on a regular ride. All of my bike chains are held together with a master link anyway. I dont see myself needing to add or subtract chain links while out on a training ride. In fact, I don't see a need for a multitool at all, other than tightening a loose screw or perhaps adjusting that pesky saddle tilt, etc. It would be different if I were riding the Trans Am trail or commuting, or something, but for daily local riding there isnt much need imho.
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Old 06-14-21, 06:42 AM
  #28  
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I've always liked the ingenuity behind this one. There is a 6mm hex behind the 15mm socket

In real life, the o-ring would get lost (see tape), the screwdriver could poke a hole in your tube, and the forging cracked when when I tried to actually use the chain tool. I still have one somewhere.

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Old 06-14-21, 07:56 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
The Park MT-1 "dog bone" tool is my favorite. It's very small, light, inexpensive and has the essential tools: 3,4,5,6,8mm hex keys, 8,9,10mm box wrenches and a small screwdriver. The allen keys are arranged for good leverage which isn't always the case with multi-tools. It, a small chain tool and tire levers have covered all of my roadside needs.
I've got something very much like that, but it's some no-name knockoff. I've had it so long I can't remember where I got it. That, and a Park neoprene envelope-like flat kit with tire levers and a patch kit (which isn't Park anymore, the original having been used up many years ago) are all I've ever needed. And a small pump, of course.

I've never been in a situation on the road where a chain tool would have made any difference. Mostly it's fixing flats and tightening the occasional loose nut.
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Old 06-14-21, 07:58 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post

What's the blue tool marked Racer? Sorry if I missed it.
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Old 06-14-21, 09:53 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
PB Swiss 470 Bike Tool. Goes with me on every ride.






--
That's a handsome tool. If you discard the tire levers, will the holder still function?
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Old 06-14-21, 10:17 AM
  #32  
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That's a handsome tool. If you discard the tire levers, will the holder still function?
Yes. The levers just clip in place. Fits comfortably in a pocket too but I keep it in my seat bag. These are professional mechanic-quality bits and Allen wrench, not your typical "do-everything at the cost of good fastener fit" type tool.



--

Last edited by drlogik; 06-14-21 at 12:16 PM.
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Old 06-14-21, 11:30 AM
  #33  
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Funny I come across this thread. I hate saddle bags and carry all my tools in my center pocket. I have been on a quest to find and put together something minimal that fit in my pocket but also be "usable" at the same time. By "usable", I meant something that was made for the job and not something that "could" be used in case of an emergency. If it's one thing I can't stand is busting my knuckles or not being able to either reach or get enough leverage because the tool was only meant for emergencies. While delving into this project, I decided to try and cover contingencies as well instead of just being able to limp home.

As far as the "multi-tool". I think the best bet is to look at some "ratchet tool kits" for bikes. There are a few out there such as Topeak that have a very small footprint. I decided on "Prestacycles Ratchet Toolset" with torque capability. This set came with all the bits that I would ever need to include 8mm for servicing pedals. The other thing that made me decide on Prestacycles is that the ratchet has been tested and rated to 60Nm. This is enough to break pedals. Other ratchet systems are not necessarily rated high enough to do all jobs. I had to get the extension and chain tool separate. Anyway, here is my setup....It started off as trying to be minimal, but there was some concessions when factoring in my definition of "usable" and being prepared for contingencies.

I'm running tubeless so my primary is my plug kit with Co2 and backup with a quality mini pump.

Total weight 743 g in a compact neoprene case. I honestly don't feel this at all when I am riding. It's like it's not there.

Items in my kit:

- spare valve cores
- quick link
- spare CR2032's for power meter and/or HR monitor
- Emergency $
- DynaPlug Kit with 5 cartridges
- Gerber Dime Multi-tool (mainly for the pliers and something to cut with)
- PrestaCycles Ratchet System with extension and chain tool. The torque mechanism is rated for 2-10Nm. The Rachet can be used up to 60Nm
- Leyzene Pocket Drive Pro Pump with a Rag
- Spare Valve
- Presta to Schrader adapter
- Tweezers (not really necessary but these are tiny and made from Ti so weighs nothing)
- Leyzene Control Drive C02 System
- Two 16gram Co2 with insulating covers
- Two velcro "zip ties"
- Two tire levers that have nipple wrenches to cover all my wheels and Mavic specific

So this ended up a quasi backpacking tool kit, but it's small enough to carry in my pocket and I honestly don't feel it.


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Old 06-14-21, 04:25 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by BCDrums View Post
What's the blue tool marked Racer? Sorry if I missed it.
That is a Dynaplug. It is used for plugging holes that cannot be sealed with sealant. It is an alternative to "bacon strips" and works much easier, in my opinion.

If you run tubes, you have a little bit different set of tools, mainly patch and boot kits.
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Old 06-14-21, 05:22 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
That is a Dynaplug. It is used for plugging holes that cannot be sealed with sealant. It is an alternative to "bacon strips" and works much easier, in my opinion.

If you run tubes, you have a little bit different set of tools, mainly patch and boot kits.
Ah, merci. I am still on tubes. Your use of Knipex pliers is inspirational.
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Old 06-15-21, 07:54 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
Here is a photo of my kit. Every part is my ideal tool in terms of usability. The Schwalbe tire levers are slim but strong. The Wera bit ratchet is rated for 40N-m, so it is strong enough for any fastener I will put it on, including the 8mm bit for pedals. The chain tool is an add-on for a fixit sticks kit which uses the bit extension as a stabilizer and the but ratchet as a handle. The red thing is a valve cap that doubles as a valve core remover. Kit includes a spare valve core, quick link, and valve extender.

the bits are 2.5mm through 8mm, t25, t27, JIS bit, small flat head, and a 1/4” square drive. The main part of the kit is exactly 250g, and the bottom row adds another 150g.

The bottom row is added to my kit for rides where I am out in the sticks and need to be more self-sufficient, but comes along most of the time anyway if I am not concerned about weight. The Knipex have removed radial wire that would have been impossible to remove with fingers. It will also remove 15mm axle nuts and pedals. It would also remove a stubborn presta nut or hold a valve body to remove a valve core that has been cemented on with dried sealant.
I like the way you think.

I do have a question though, what is that thing next to the pliers covered with a piece of inner-tube??
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Old 06-15-21, 08:00 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by jadocs View Post
I like the way you think.

I do have a question though, what is that thing next to the pliers covered with a piece of inner-tube??
Spare set of brake pads
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Old 06-15-21, 08:56 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
Spare set of brake pads
What are you using for air?
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Old 06-15-21, 09:41 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by jadocs View Post
What are you using for air?
I have a Silca Tattico (the dumb version, not the Bluetooth version) on my adventure bike. I also like the Lezyne pumps - I have MTB versions for my MTB and my road and commuting bikes have smaller diameter versions.

I am not a fan of CO2. A pump is an unlimited supply of air, compared to what can be carried in a cartridge or two.
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Old 06-15-21, 10:11 AM
  #40  
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Yep, my pump is my backup/topping off. The Co2 is primary for purposes of time or in case tire needs a blast to seat the bead.
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Old 06-15-21, 02:55 PM
  #41  
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Syncros Matchbox 20
It has everything I need to work on my road bike, and it's sturdy and compact.
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Old 06-16-21, 08:19 AM
  #42  
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I am not a fan of CO2. A pump is an unlimited supply of air, compared to what can be carried in a cartridge or two.
I agree. CO2 is really handy in a pinch, I'll acknowledge that, but a pump is a more reliable air supply in my opinion. On long rides, for me, reliability takes precedent over convenience.
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Old 06-16-21, 09:21 AM
  #43  
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Fix-It-Sticks kit. Mine is older that wasn’t sold as a “commuter” or “mountain bike” kit. I would probably choose the mountain bike kit over the commuter one. Although I have never had to a multi tool chain tool on my bike, I have used it on others’ so I carry it. The 15mm open end wrench in the commuter kit has less utility.



The tire levers are have a magnet in the to keep them attached, although they can be used without the levers and work well for looser tires.



The chain tool is particularly ingenious.



This is my “go everywhere” kit. I use the CO2 in town and on trails but for tours, I leave them at home. I also carry a Topeak pump on every bike I own.

  1. FiberFix spoke
  2. chain lube in a 2 oz bottle. This is enough for close to 10,000 miles of riding…honest!
  3. Rema patch kit. I wouldn’t carry anything else
  4. splined nipple wrench since most of my bikes have splined spoke nipples
  5. bearing load tool for Shimano cranks
  6. CO2 head
  7. CO2 canisters
  8. Pressure gauge
  9. Leatherman Squirt
  10. ceramic blade knife
  11. Toe strap and Velcro strap
  12. Various nuts and bolts for racks and chainrings
  13. Film canister (remember those) wrapped in duct tape and with about 6 cotton balls mixed with Vaseline for starting fires
  14. Fire starter
  15. (Not numbered) zip ties
  16. Tyvek evelope from the US Postal service for tire boot. It’s light, compact, and tough…and free!
  17. Bits for Fix-It-Sticks. I added a JIS cross head bit because I’ve become spoiled using them at home.
  18. Fix-it-Sticks.
  19. Aluminum wrench filed to fit 15mm flat. I have Paul brakes and they occasionally need adjusting.
  20. Tire levers
  21. chain tool
  22. Wooltooth chain pliers with 9 and 10 speed quick links.
I use a Lezyne tool wrap and an old camera case to carry the tool kit. It all fits in my Camelbak
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Old 06-16-21, 11:51 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Fix-It-Sticks kit. Mine is older that wasn’t sold as a “commuter” or “mountain bike” kit. I would probably choose the mountain bike kit over the commuter one. Although I have never had to a multi tool chain tool on my bike, I have used it on others’ so I carry it. The 15mm open end wrench in the commuter kit has less utility.



The tire levers are have a magnet in the to keep them attached, although they can be used without the levers and work well for looser tires.



The chain tool is particularly ingenious.



This is my “go everywhere” kit. I use the CO2 in town and on trails but for tours, I leave them at home. I also carry a Topeak pump on every bike I own.
  1. FiberFix spoke
  2. chain lube in a 2 oz bottle. This is enough for close to 10,000 miles of riding…honest!
  3. Rema patch kit. I wouldn’t carry anything else
  4. splined nipple wrench since most of my bikes have splined spoke nipples
  5. bearing load tool for Shimano cranks
  6. CO2 head
  7. CO2 canisters
  8. Pressure gauge
  9. Leatherman Squirt
  10. ceramic blade knife
  11. Toe strap and Velcro strap
  12. Various nuts and bolts for racks and chainrings
  13. Film canister (remember those) wrapped in duct tape and with about 6 cotton balls mixed with Vaseline for starting fires
  14. Fire starter
  15. (Not numbered) zip ties
  16. Tyvek evelope from the US Postal service for tire boot. It’s light, compact, and tough…and free!
  17. Bits for Fix-It-Sticks. I added a JIS cross head bit because I’ve become spoiled using them at home.
  18. Fix-it-Sticks.
  19. Aluminum wrench filed to fit 15mm flat. I have Paul brakes and they occasionally need adjusting.
  20. Tire levers
  21. chain tool
  22. Wooltooth chain pliers with 9 and 10 speed quick links.
I use a Lezyne tool wrap and an old camera case to carry the tool kit. It all fits in my Camelbak
I almost went with the fixit stix and squirt myself.
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Old 06-18-21, 06:24 PM
  #45  
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I have the ratchet fixit stick but it is a pain to carry the sleeve lets the bits fall out. so I got this setup. I will use the fixit at home and my shop.


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Old 07-24-21, 07:49 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
PB Swiss 470 Bike Tool. Goes with me on every ride.

I have a number of fine mutli-tools (some expensive); however, the only one, the only one that can function as good as a regular tool is the PB Swiss Bike Tool (made in Switzerland). The handle's side is also a full-functioning tire lever. Not cheap but the best I have found and I have Park, Lezyne, Pedro, Crankbrothers, etc.

Amazon has them sometimes. Their US distributor has them too: https://www.shop.pbtools.us/

This is the PB Swiss. Come in a rainbow of different colors too:





--
How do you like the tire levers with this? Better or at least as good as the full size Pedro's?
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Old 07-24-21, 08:08 AM
  #47  
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Mr. Wasabi,

They're made for side-of-the-road flat repairs. They aren't shop-type levers but they work fine. Just don't get too aggressive with them. Unless you have super tight fitting tires, you won't have any problems getting them off the rim.

The main reason I got this tool is for the bit quality. This is not a traditional multi-tool in that, the bits are super high quality, not "multi-tool" quality. I use their Allen wrenches full-time now and they fit really tight and precise. These bits are the same fit. No rounding out Allen bolts and screws, or for me, the axles on my fixed gear bikes. It's worth it for that alone. If you have a bike with super tight fitting tires, leave the levers off and take your Pedro's.

BTW, have you tried the new Silca tire levers? Wow!


--

Last edited by drlogik; 07-24-21 at 08:15 AM.
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Old 07-24-21, 08:16 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Mr. Wasabi,

They're made for side-of-the-road flat repairs. They aren't shop-type levers but they work fine. Just don't get too aggressive with them. Unless you have super tight fitting tires, you won't have any problems getting them off the rim.

The main reason I got this tool is for the bit quality. This is not a traditional multi-tool in that, the bits are super high quality, not "multi-tool" quality. I use their Allen wrenches full-time now and they fit really tight and precise. These bits are the same fit. No rounding out Allen bolts and screws, or for me, the axles on my fixed gear bikes. It's worth it for that alone. If you have a bike with super tight fitting tires, leave the levers off and take your Pedro's.
Thank you for the reply,

Understood on side of the road repairs for all the parts in any of these packs/multi-tools. That's all I expect out of these. I already have some Pedro's levers in my bag but was just wondering if it's worth keeping those over the stock PB Tools levers in my bag? Splitting hairs here I guess. I'm also checking out the Topeak Rachet Rocket Lite DX:
https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product...ROCKET-LITE-DX

Oh, I'll checkout the Silca levers too.
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Old 07-24-21, 08:26 AM
  #49  
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but was just wondering if it's worth keeping those over the stock PB Tools levers in my bag?
If you get this tool, recommend it highly, you could always use them at home changing tires to see how they perform, then make the decision. Full disclosure, on one bike, my old Pinarello, with Campy rims, I still use my old trusty VAR tire tool and carry it in the bag also. All other bikes have one of these in the saddle bag.
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Old 07-24-21, 11:44 AM
  #50  
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Hey, lots of good information and reasoned opinion in this thread.

I'l add that your tool kit needs to match your bike (and any bike along you might have responsibility for). Mentioned upthread is a difference between tubeless and tube kits. So, your bike might not require some tools. Your bike might require special tools. My commuter bike is fitted with a couple of security Torx™️ fasteners, so that bike's kit includes the appropriate security star bit. A couple of the bikes have 4.5mm hex fittings (!). The older bikes mostly have external hex nut fittings - a multi-tool full of allen keys won't be much help. My main ride these days is a Dahon Curl - great little machine! But, and it's a big but, rear flats can be 'involved'. Getting the 16" Schwalbe Marathon Plus off and back on the Sun CR18 ISO349 rim is a %#&@%. In addition to a fairly normal on-road kit, I carry three Pedros, a Crank Brothers Speedier and a Koolstop tire jack. Yeah, now the tire's my %#&@%.



Since my Curl pretty much has to operate with an exact count of chain links, I carry a short length of chain in the event I have the rare issue with a link or two.

BTW, you might want to carry tools for your bike even if your repair skills aren't up to the task - bicycle repairman might happen along.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2howud

Last edited by tcs; 07-24-21 at 03:14 PM.
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