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Which bottom bracket tool - 1987 Peugeot)

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Which bottom bracket tool - 1987 Peugeot)

Old 07-15-21, 07:39 AM
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Which bottom bracket tool - 1987 Peugeot)

Hi all,
I picked up an old - what I'm pretty sure is - 1987 Peugeot Orient Express. Going to completely strip it and rebuild. I've never dealt with BB's before but I'm trying to teach myself. I was wondering if anyone knew which BB this had and which tool I'd need to take it off. I'm heading to the bike shop today to buy the crank arm remover and need to also pick up the BB tool but figured I'd throw this out there to see if anyone knew which it might be so I didn't have to make multiple trips to the bike shop. I've read that after around 1984 these should have British/English threading and this bike was made in Japan. Here's pics I have so far, just removing the crank bolts.

Back story: I saw these bikes and really liked the style and read they were decent bikes for their day. Thought it'd be cool to convert one to a gravel bike. This one was in pretty rough shape but I picked it up for $10. Going to try all the rust removal etc. I know it's probably not worth the money in the long run to add all new parts but the biggest part of this journey is me learning how to do everything and experimenting/getting comfortable working on bikes and building from the ground up. I'm taking a lot of pics of the process and will be adding a thread about it.


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Old 07-15-21, 09:57 AM
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For the NDS it looks like maybe a B & C.
Can't tell DS.
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Old 07-15-21, 11:07 AM
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The Sakae Ringyo crank arms can be removed with a standard 22mm crank tool. A hook spanner like the Hozan C-205 will remove the lockring from the adjustable cup, and the Park HCW-11 will allow you to remove and adjust the cup. Don't bother removing the fixed cup unless you need to replace the entire bottom bracket. Just clean in out in situ and repack with fresh balls and grease.
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Old 07-15-21, 11:15 AM
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Thanks all, I'll look into these. I know my bike shop has the crank tool, might have to order the other ones.
The BB sounds pretty gritty in spinning it. One step of this process is soaking the frame in oxalic acid to remove the rust so I just assumed I should completely remove the BB for this process. I already did the fork and it made quite a bit of difference.
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Old 07-15-21, 02:52 PM
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You'll likely see two wrench flats on the fixed cup that you can use during removal. But the late '80s, I'm pretty sure Peugeot had moved to the British threading, which is left-hand threads on the drive/fixed cup side. That is, you'll turn it to the right to loosen it.

If the BB is gritty enough that you want to service it, you may consider replacing it with a cartridge style. If the BB shell is indeed British threaded, this'll really open up your options here. If it's French or Swiss threaded, then you may need to stick with cleaning up the original parts.
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Old 07-15-21, 08:01 PM
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If you plan on doing bottom bracket maintenance occasionally/only on your bike (and you have the tools or know someone who has them and/or time), you can make a lock ring pliers and a "Sheldon Brown fixed cup tool" easily and cheaply. I've had my set for 5 years now, and have worked pretty well on my bikes (albeit none's a classic or something valuable/rare!). Here's my set, and the link for the Sheldon's bottom bracket tool.

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/tooltips/bbcups.html


For the adjustable cup, you could try an adjustable pin spanner wrench.
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Old 07-15-21, 08:08 PM
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You need a puller to remove the cranks. Be sure to thread all the way in first.
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Old 07-16-21, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Homebrew01
You need a puller to remove the cranks. Be sure to thread all the way in first.
And make sure you remove the washer (if there is one) between the bolt and crank arm.

Years ago, I didn't look closely and left the washer in place. When I tried to remove the crankarm with the crank puller, I learned a valuable lesson that I will never forget.
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Old 07-16-21, 12:02 PM
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Big Wheel Bikes in D.C. and environs. What a place!
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Old 07-20-21, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by MudPie
And make sure you remove the washer (if there is one) between the bolt and crank arm.

Years ago, I didn't look closely and left the washer in place. When I tried to remove the crankarm with the crank puller, I learned a valuable lesson that I will never forget.
Thanks again all. I bought the Park Tools CWP-7 but still can't seem to get the cranks off. Definitely no washer in there but as soon as tighten it down it just stops. I've tried holding the large part that screws into the threads and just turning the inner part that pushes against the BB to no avail - both sides. Any tips? I read someone say heat it up with a torch to loosen it up. Might invest in a 3-jaw puller as well. These things are not budging at all. Also pretty positive I'm using the correct (smaller) side for these square tapered cranks.
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Old 07-20-21, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by partyanimal
Thanks again all. I bought the Park Tools CWP-7 but still can't seem to get the cranks off. Definitely no washer in there but as soon as tighten it down it just stops. I've tried holding the large part that screws into the threads and just turning the inner part that pushes against the BB to no avail - both sides. Any tips? I read someone say heat it up with a torch to loosen it up. Might invest in a 3-jaw puller as well. These things are not budging at all. Also pretty positive I'm using the correct (smaller) side for these square tapered cranks.
For the square taper spindle, yes, the smaller diameter tip is the correct size. You just might need more leverage to pull the crank arm off. Do you have an adjustable wrench that is about as long as the crank arm? Often, the position of the wrench and nearest crank arm helps. For example, I ow the instruction say to screw the fixed part of the puller for the entire depth of the crank arm threads. (Note, for the crank pullers with the built in wrench handle, I've cheated a bit, and backed the fixed part a quarter turn or so (never more than a full revolution), in order to position the handle into an advantageous position.) It's often easier to squeeze your hands together, while holding the adjustable wrench and crankarm is a scissor action. Or if you position the adjustable wrench and the crank arm at 90 degrees, that gives you good leverage. Once you break the joint loose, like a 1/4 turn, the arms usually slides right off with little to no force. It's just the initial 1/4 turn that is often very hard.

Last edited by MudPie; 07-20-21 at 01:21 PM.
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Old 07-20-21, 01:15 PM
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This is a pretty good video and instructions from Park Tool. Note, he talks about wrench position and mechanical advantage.
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair...on-three-piece
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Old 07-20-21, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by MudPie
For the square taper spindle, yes, the smaller diameter tip is the correct size. You just might need more leverage to pull the crank arm off. Do you have an adjustable wrench that is about as long as the crank arm? Often, the position of the wrench and nearest crank arm helps. For example, I ow the instruction say to screw the fixed part of the puller for the entire depth of the crank arm threads. In the past, I've cheated a bit, and backed the fixed part a quarter turn or so (never more than a full revolution), in order to position the adjustable wrench is an advantageous position. It's often easier to squeeze your hands together, while holding the adjustable wrench and crankarm is a scissor action. Or if you position the adjustable wrench and the crank arm at 90 degrees, that gives you good leverage. Once you break the joint loose, like a 1/4 turn, the arms usually slides right off with little to no force. It's just the initial 1/4 turn that is often very hard.
yeah, i've tried backing off the fixed part and definitely done the scissor trick. And I've tried a regular 15mm wrench and the larger adjustable. It just seems like once the smaller tip screws in where it's touching it just completely stops - no give at all. I checked both sides multiple times thinking there must be a washer in there to be that unforgiving but nothing.

I might have to take it to my local co-op to see if we can do it there. I have a bike stand but it's not the beefiest thing and not super sturdy.
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Old 07-20-21, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by partyanimal
yeah, i've tried backing off the fixed part and definitely done the scissor trick. And I've tried a regular 15mm wrench and the larger adjustable. It just seems like once the smaller tip screws in where it's touching it just completely stops - no give at all. I checked both sides multiple times thinking there must be a washer in there to be that unforgiving but nothing.

I might have to take it to my local co-op to see if we can do it there. I have a bike stand but it's not the beefiest thing and not super sturdy.
it may be daunting at first, especially if itís your first crank removal but youíre doing everything right. Thereís not much to go wrong. Just more force! But I understand the apprehension too. Once you feel the wrench turn, itíll feel victorious! BTW, if you set the tools properly like using scissor technique, very little force is transmitted to the bike stand.
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Old 07-20-21, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by partyanimal
Thanks again all. I bought the Park Tools CWP-7 but still can't seem to get the cranks off. Definitely no washer in there but as soon as tighten it down it just stops. I've tried holding the large part that screws into the threads and just turning the inner part that pushes against the BB to no avail - both sides. Any tips? I read someone say heat it up with a torch to loosen it up. Might invest in a 3-jaw puller as well. These things are not budging at all. Also pretty positive I'm using the correct (smaller) side for these square tapered cranks.
grease the crank puller threads and ensure that itís screwed all the way in - the more threads you engage, the less likely you strip any when you really lean on it. When Iím doing crank/BB stuff where significant grunt is involved, I do it with the wheels in the frame and the bike on the ground. I stand on the opposite side from where Iím working and lean over the top tube. I figure that the frame on its wheels is designed to take way more torquing than I can generate with a wrench, so I give it my all (with a cheater bar if necessary) with no misgivings. Always works 👍
If youíre going to try a gear puller, try a two-jaw one - easier to find a couple of spots than three, but I think with adequate leverage a regular crank puller will do the job

Last edited by Litespud; 07-20-21 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 06-12-23, 07:55 PM
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Old but very useful thread!
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