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Alloy steerer carbon fork okay on carbon bike frame?

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Alloy steerer carbon fork okay on carbon bike frame?

Old 08-13-21, 02:55 PM
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jonathanf2
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Alloy steerer carbon fork okay on carbon bike frame?

I'm trying to find out if I'll be okay using an alloy steerer carbon fork on a carbon frame head tube? Also would I need to grease the alloy steerer? I read grease can cause issues with the carbon fiber. If I use carbon paste, doesn't that increase friction? Would I be better off going with a full carbon fork instead with the frame? Thanks for any advice!
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Old 08-13-21, 03:15 PM
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Totally OK to use any material steerer tube in any material frame.
No need to grease steerer tube regardless of material.
carbon paste is typically used between the stem clamp and the handlebar.
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Old 08-13-21, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee View Post
Totally OK to use any material steerer tube in any material frame.
No need to grease steerer tube regardless of material.
carbon paste is typically used between the stem clamp and the handlebar.
Thanks! I just wanted to confirm if I go ahead with this particular bike build. In terms of bearings though, light grease should suffice?
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Old 08-13-21, 04:43 PM
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As icemilkcoffee said, the materials are totally okay. I have a carbon frame with and aluminum steerer/carbon blade fork, and an aluminum frame with a carbon/carbon fork. I've also had a steel frame with an aluminum/carbon fork. Size matters. Materials do not.

You definitely don't want grease between the stem and the steerer. I use lithium grease for bike parts that need grease, including bearings.

What'cha building?
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Old 08-13-21, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Eric F View Post
As icemilkcoffee said, the materials are totally okay. I have a carbon frame with and aluminum steerer/carbon blade fork, and an aluminum frame with a carbon/carbon fork. I've also had a steel frame with an aluminum/carbon fork. Size matters. Materials do not.

You definitely don't want grease between the stem and the steerer. I use lithium grease for bike parts that need grease, including bearings.

What'cha building?
I'm thinking of putting together a carbon bike with a Shimano 105 groupset. It's a disc frame that also takes wide tires if I want tweak it for gravel later on. I've been doing group rides lately and the itch to keep up with fast pace leaders is making me think of another bike!
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Old 08-14-21, 01:36 PM
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Just to be clear, carbon paste is a mix of silica grit, carbon black, and a grease-like or gel-like substance. It is designed to keep clamped parts from slipping, It is highly abrasive. It should never get near bearings, like headset bearings. If you put carbon assembly paste on your headset bearings, or between the bearings and the bearing seat, you'd ruin the frame, and/or fork and/or bearings in short order.

If you have sealed headset bearings, you probably don't need to mess with grease even unless your instructions call for lubricant like TFE paste (which, unlike carbon paste, IS a lubricant).

If you have open bearings, any common bike grease is fine.
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Old 08-14-21, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by WizardOfBoz View Post
Just to be clear, carbon paste is a mix of silica grit, carbon black, and a grease-like or gel-like substance. It is designed to keep clamped parts from slipping, It is highly abrasive. It should never get near bearings, like headset bearings. If you put carbon assembly paste on your headset bearings, or between the bearings and the bearing seat, you'd ruin the frame, and/or fork and/or bearings in short order.

If you have sealed headset bearings, you probably don't need to mess with grease even unless your instructions call for lubricant like TFE paste (which, unlike carbon paste, IS a lubricant).

If you have open bearings, any common bike grease is fine.
You should ALWAYS grease cartridge headset bearings where they contact frame or fork. Always. As in every time.
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Old 08-14-21, 08:11 PM
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The main reason I see for doing some sort of steerer coating when installing it into the frame/headset is long term corroeion reduction. Not everyone will need this as some don't sweat a lot or have especially aggressive sweat. But for some and those who ride in the Rust Belt and a lot of rain this thin coating can save so much frustration later.

Common bike greases do no damage to carbon/resin. But their lubricating quality might not be what's needed. I agree with carbon assembly paste for the clamped surfaces, and only them. Greases can cause discoloring to a bike's finish over time but not to the structural aspect. It was Craig Calfee who said that there was no stuff you can buy from your local hardware store that will damage the strength or reliability of the frame.

My opinion takes in the various headsets and forks, using Al or carbon parts (spacers, steerers, compression plugs and such) that I have pried or cut off because the headset wasn't coming apart or able to be adjusted because of galvanic corrosion. Andy
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