Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Shortening and re-threading spokes

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Shortening and re-threading spokes

Old 10-08-21, 04:51 AM
  #1  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Shortening and re-threading spokes

After lacing up my 700c wheel with a 3-cross pattern, I've concluded the 296mm spokes are too long - actually my Park Tool spoke length gauge shows them to be around 294 - 295mm but they were ordered as 296. With the nipples all threaded to the point where the threads just disappear into the shaft of the nipple the spokes are still way too loose, the nipple heads aren't even seated onto the grommets and there's only another 3 mm or so before the unthreaded part of the spoke runs into the nipple threads - I feel like there needs to be some thread headroom to allow for truing and dishing. I imagine they could stand to be 2 - 3 mm shorter.

Rather than hunt down and pay for another set of these DT Swiss Alpine 3 spokes and have a bunch of spokes I can't use and maybe try to sell them on eBay for less than I paid, I'm looking at these Cyclo spoke threaders so I can use the spokes I have.

Do you see a problem with adding additional thread length to an already threaded spoke? As I understand it you roll the threads in stages with the threading head - so lets say I grind or cut 2 mm off a spoke, do you think it would be problematic to match it up to the portion of the threads that are already there and then add additional length to the threaded area?

Last edited by MyRedTrek; 10-08-21 at 05:38 AM.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 06:20 AM
  #2  
Dan Burkhart 
Senior member
 
Dan Burkhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oakville Ontario
Posts: 7,768
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 771 Post(s)
Liked 340 Times in 201 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
After lacing up my 700c wheel with a 3-cross pattern, I've concluded the 296mm spokes are too long - actually my Park Tool spoke length gauge shows them to be around 294 - 295mm but they were ordered as 296. With the nipples all threaded to the point where the threads just disappear into the shaft of the nipple the spokes are still way too loose, the nipple heads aren't even seated onto the grommets and there's only another 3 mm or so before the unthreaded part of the spoke runs into the nipple threads - I feel like there needs to be some thread headroom to allow for truing and dishing. I imagine they could stand to be 2 - 3 mm shorter.

Rather than hunt down and pay for another set of these DT Swiss Alpine 3 spokes and have a bunch of spokes I can't use and maybe try to sell them on eBay for less than I paid, I'm looking at these Cyclo spoke threaders so I can use the spokes I have.

Do you see a problem with adding additional thread length to an already threaded spoke? As I understand it you roll the threads in stages with the threading head - so lets say I grind or cut 2 mm off a spoke, do you think it would be problematic to match it up to the portion of the threads that are already there and then add additional length to the threaded area?
If the threads have just disappeared into the nipple, you still have quite a ways to go before running out of thread. I would keep tightening and watch the back side of the nipple to see if it comes out past the nipple head before the spoke begins to tension. Even a couple of mm past the nipple head at full tension is not usually a problem with a double wall rim, and is actually preferable to spokes that are too short.
Take one of your nipples and thread it onto a spoke that has not been inserted into the rim and see how far you can thread it on with your fingers. You can safely go well beyond that point with a spoke wrench.
As to the question about shortening spokes, I do it all the time, but I have shop grade equipment to do it with. My Morizumi spoke cutter will easily cut and rethread a spoke by as little as 2 mm.Other machines might not handle the job as well.
This article explains why spokes a little too long are not a problem and may actually be beneficial. https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/nipple-threads/

Last edited by Dan Burkhart; 10-08-21 at 06:23 AM.
Dan Burkhart is online now  
Likes For Dan Burkhart:
Old 10-08-21, 08:25 AM
  #3  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 12,852

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1389 Post(s)
Liked 626 Times in 467 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
After lacing up my 700c wheel with a 3-cross pattern, I've concluded the 296mm spokes are too long .....
Is this your first build? It's surprising how much things snug up when the spokes are pulling in different directions.
Bill Kapaun is online now  
Old 10-08-21, 08:33 AM
  #4  
canopus 
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,538

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 88 Posts
The nipple threads onto a spoke a lot further than you think, and even if the spoke sticks through the nipple inside the rim, you can just dremel the spoke flat with the nipple. It has been done alot over the years. I just had to grind mine off from being 3mm longer than I needed on a single wall build.
If you can tension the wheel without bottoming the nipple, your fine. I wouldn't try to re-thread them unless I knew the nipple had bottomed out.
__________________
1984 Cannondale ST
1985 Cannondale SR300
1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
1984 Trek 760
1981 Trek 710
Pics
canopus is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 09:19 AM
  #5  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,604

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 129 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4459 Post(s)
Liked 1,992 Times in 1,195 Posts
I have a Hozan C-700 spoke threader. I have had done this before when I had an overabundance of spokes that are close to the right length and I’m using double walled rims. It works but you should be careful about how much more you thread the spokes. The 2.0mm portion of DT butted spokes is short. Adding 2 to 5mm of thread is okay but anymore than that starts to get to the where the spoke necks down.

That said, the spoke threader is currently going for $180. I’ve had mine for 30+ years and have used it a few times. I’m not sure I ever got that much value out of it for what it cost. Yes, DT Alpine III are expensive but not that expensive. They are even cheaper if you buy them from https://www.rosebikes.com/search?q=alpine+iii]Rose Bikes[/url]. Even with shipping they are economical.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 09:44 AM
  #6  
Moe Zhoost
Half way there
 
Moe Zhoost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 2,533

Bikes: Many, and the list changes frequently

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 829 Post(s)
Liked 626 Times in 373 Posts
Every once in a while I'll lace a wheel and it looks like the spokes may be way too long. Invariably it is the result of me not paying attention when lacing and getting one spoke in the wrong rim hole, which then affects the rest. Easy enough to fix though. I'd recommend that you take a good look at your lacing before you do anything else.

I agree with the recommendations to tension the wheel and see where you get to. Spoke ends protruding through the nipple can be managed by grinding if too high. The bigger issue is that you run out of threads before reaching proper tension, but you won't know that until you try. I, too, have invested in the Hozan threader and have found it useful for running a few more threads on a spoke. I have also cut long spokes and rolled new threads for a new wheel build, but that's a real chore to avoid if you can. I'm damned by being cheap and having too many spokes left over from prior builds.

Good luck
Moe Zhoost is offline  
Likes For Moe Zhoost:
Old 10-08-21, 11:36 AM
  #7  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,166

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1377 Post(s)
Liked 917 Times in 637 Posts
Also note that most spoke threads are rolled, not cut, so the starting material is insufficient for cutting full threads with a die. Instead a spoke threading machine is used.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Likes For dsbrantjr:
Old 10-08-21, 11:37 AM
  #8  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 20,104

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 285 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22329 Post(s)
Liked 5,386 Times in 3,915 Posts
Originally Posted by Moe Zhoost View Post
Every once in a while I'll lace a wheel and it looks like the spokes may be way too long. Invariably it is the result of me not paying attention when lacing and getting one spoke in the wrong rim hole, which then affects the rest. Easy enough to fix though. I'd recommend that you take a good look at your lacing before you do anything else.

...
...me too.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 11:53 AM
  #9  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,206

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3228 Post(s)
Liked 1,373 Times in 926 Posts
The first step to solving a problem is to determine without a doubt that you have one!

Double-check your lacing, continue bringing up the spoke tension. If you can't get to full tension before the spokes bottom out, then we can talk about shortening them or buying new spokes.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 11:56 AM
  #10  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 7,897

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1513 Post(s)
Liked 878 Times in 582 Posts
Originally Posted by Moe Zhoost View Post
Every once in a while I'll lace a wheel and it looks like the spokes may be way too long. Invariably it is the result of me not paying attention when lacing and getting one spoke in the wrong rim hole, which then affects the rest. Easy enough to fix though. I'd recommend that you take a good look at your lacing before you do anything else.

I agree with the recommendations to tension the wheel and see where you get to. Spoke ends protruding through the nipple can be managed by grinding if too high. The bigger issue is that you run out of threads before reaching proper tension, but you won't know that until you try. I, too, have invested in the Hozan threader and have found it useful for running a few more threads on a spoke. I have also cut long spokes and rolled new threads for a new wheel build, but that's a real chore to avoid if you can. I'm damned by being cheap and having too many spokes left over from prior builds.

Good luck
what happened to me on my last build.....
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 12:46 PM
  #11  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
The first step to solving a problem is to determine without a doubt that you have one!

Double-check your lacing, continue bringing up the spoke tension. If you can't get to full tension before the spokes bottom out, then we can talk about shortening them or buying new spokes.
Sounds like a plan.

Using a digital caliper it looks like there's 3.5 - 4mm extra distance inside the nipples before the threaded portion starts, so 7-8 mm total distance figuring opposing sides of the rim. Of course I don't want to have to use all of it to give some headroom for adjusting. I took the spokes all out to measure them - I'll re-lace and see what happens. Being a complete newbie I can use the practice.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 01:00 PM
  #12  
trailangel
Senior Member
 
trailangel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 4,705

Bikes: Schwinn Varsity

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 591 Times in 348 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
Sounds like a plan.

Using a digital caliper it looks like there's 3.5 - 4mm extra distance inside the nipples before the threaded portion starts, so 7-8 mm total distance figuring opposing sides of the rim. Of course I don't want to have to use all of it to give some headroom for adjusting. I took the spokes all out to measure them - I'll re-lace and see what happens. Being a complete newbie I can use the practice.
Use it all. What will you need to adjust? Build the wheels.
trailangel is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 01:07 PM
  #13  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
Sounds like a plan.

Using a digital caliper it looks like there's 3.5 - 4mm extra distance inside the nipples before the threaded portion starts, so 7-8 mm total distance figuring opposing sides of the rim. Of course I don't want to have to use all of it to give some headroom for adjusting. I took the spokes all out to measure them - I'll re-lace and see what happens. Being a complete newbie I can use the practice.
Use it all. What will you need to adjust? Build the wheels.
Future truing and spoke tensioning.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 01:44 PM
  #14  
ign1te
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
After lacing up my 700c wheel with a 3-cross pattern, I've concluded the 296mm spokes are too long - actually my Park Tool spoke length gauge shows them to be around 294 - 295mm but they were ordered as 296. With the nipples all threaded to the point where the threads just disappear into the shaft of the nipple the spokes are still way too loose, the nipple heads aren't even seated onto the grommets and there's only another 3 mm or so before the unthreaded part of the spoke runs into the nipple threads - I feel like there needs to be some thread headroom to allow for truing and dishing. I imagine they could stand to be 2 - 3 mm shorter.

Rather than hunt down and pay for another set of these DT Swiss Alpine 3 spokes and have a bunch of spokes I can't use and maybe try to sell them on eBay for less than I paid, I'm looking at these Cyclo spoke threaders so I can use the spokes I have.

Do you see a problem with adding additional thread length to an already threaded spoke? As I understand it you roll the threads in stages with the threading head - so lets say I grind or cut 2 mm off a spoke, do you think it would be problematic to match it up to the portion of the threads that are already there and then add additional length to the threaded area?
If you are determined to use the components you have on hand, there is a hack solution you can use. It is possible to control how tight the spiral pattern in the wheel is, by lacing the wheel in a specific way. This then allows you to accomodate a range of spoke lengths with a given hub/rim.
Assuming a 36 hole hub, place 9 spokes on one side. Then immediately after this step, rotate the hub in on direction until it cant rotate any further. Lock in the rotation of the hub by placing a spoke on the opposite side of the hub in the appropriate position. Then lace the wheel fully.
You can build a proper wheel like this. The thing that is sacrificed by doing this is the nipple-spoke angle. A nipple can only move to a small extent in a standard rim, so if the spokes come in at a steep angle to the nipple a "broken line" or kink will be formed between the nipple and spoke. Many machine built wheels come with a noticeable kink, stemming from poor rim/spoke/hub combinations. Presumably, they still last for an acceptable period of time.
If you have ever removed spokes from an old wheel, some spokes will have a noticeable kink just below the end of the thread on the spoke. This is the end result of poor spoke-nipple alignment.
ign1te is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 01:50 PM
  #15  
KCT1986
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 326
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 86 Times in 61 Posts
What was the method that you used to select the 296 length? Spoke calculator? How did you get data on rim nipple seat dia. & hub specs.?

If these are correct and you used a proper calculator correctly, your length should be good.
KCT1986 is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 02:15 PM
  #16  
daniell
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 6 Posts
What cross are you using? If 3, would 4 cross work out with the longer spokes?
daniell is online now  
Old 10-08-21, 02:47 PM
  #17  
canopus 
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,538

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 88 Posts
Originally Posted by KCT1986 View Post
What was the method that you used to select the 296 length? Spoke calculator? How did you get data on rim nipple seat dia. & hub specs.?

If these are correct and you used a proper calculator correctly, your length should be good.
Depending on the calculator I have seen a 2mm difference in spoke lengths with the same dimensions inputted and after building the wheel was still off by 3mm. It happens...
__________________
1984 Cannondale ST
1985 Cannondale SR300
1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
1984 Trek 760
1981 Trek 710
Pics
canopus is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 03:37 PM
  #18  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by KCT1986 View Post
What was the method that you used to select the 296 length? Spoke calculator? How did you get data on rim nipple seat dia. & hub specs.?

If these are correct and you used a proper calculator correctly, your length should be good.
It was what someone on here with more experience using spoke calculators suggested on a previous thread I posted. I'm not going to complain because they were trying to help. And the fact is I haven't yet reached a final verdict that the length is wrong. I'm going to try re-lacing and go farther into the nipple and see what happens.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 04:13 PM
  #19  
gearbasher
Senior Member
 
gearbasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sitting on my butt in front of a computer
Posts: 1,130
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 273 Post(s)
Liked 178 Times in 121 Posts
I find, with using spoke lengths suggested by the calculators, you really don't start feeling any tension until the top of the spoke is right at the bottom of the slot in the nipple. Then a few of turns more and the wheel is pretty good.
gearbasher is offline  
Likes For gearbasher:
Old 10-08-21, 04:20 PM
  #20  
KCT1986
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 326
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 86 Times in 61 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
It was what someone on here with more experience using spoke calculators suggested on a previous thread I posted. I'm not going to complain because they were trying to help. And the fact is I haven't yet reached a final verdict that the length is wrong. I'm going to try re-lacing and go farther into the nipple and see what happens.
Just looked at the other thread, Rhyno Lite, 36H, FH-T610, 3X, correct?

If the rim nipple seat dia. that they are using is correct then their estimate of 295 should be fine.

Re-lace with the correct pattern and we'll see...
KCT1986 is offline  
Old 10-08-21, 04:37 PM
  #21  
KCT1986
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 326
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 86 Times in 61 Posts
Originally Posted by canopus View Post
Depending on the calculator I have seen a 2mm difference in spoke lengths with the same dimensions inputted and after building the wheel was still off by 3mm. It happens...
I've seen minor differences between calculators but all of my builds have been very standard/common configs. Mainly use SpokeCalc or DT Swiss calc.
Like the OP's wheel, most of the builds have been; 3x, 32 or 36H, Shimano standard hubs & 2.0 or 1.8 straight or DB spokes on 26" or 700C rims.

Never ran number of any strange or unusual builds, eg; low spoke count, paired spokes, unusually heavy dish, asymmetric drilling, extreme butted spokes, really deep rims, IGH hub, etc.
KCT1986 is offline  
Old 10-09-21, 01:26 PM
  #22  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
The first step to solving a problem is to determine without a doubt that you have one!

Double-check your lacing, continue bringing up the spoke tension. If you can't get to full tension before the spokes bottom out, then we can talk about shortening them or buying new spokes.
At this point I *think* it's going to work but it's close on some of the spokes. A couple of observations I've made is that there's some variance between spokes of supposedly the same length. I replaced a few that I think actually did bottom out with shorter ones out of the batch I got.

If I were to do it again I'd go with 294 or 293 mm spokes.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-09-21, 01:31 PM
  #23  
trailangel
Senior Member
 
trailangel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 4,705

Bikes: Schwinn Varsity

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1813 Post(s)
Liked 591 Times in 348 Posts
What length spokes did you order for the DS and what length for the NDS?
trailangel is offline  
Old 10-09-21, 03:03 PM
  #24  
MyRedTrek
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
What length spokes did you order for the DS and what length for the NDS?
Originally I ordered equal numbers of 295 and 296 but measuring them they all seem to be around 294-295 and not in equal numbers - none of them measure 296 no matter how I fit them in the gauge.
MyRedTrek is offline  
Old 10-09-21, 03:42 PM
  #25  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,206

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3228 Post(s)
Liked 1,373 Times in 926 Posts
Originally Posted by MyRedTrek View Post
At this point I *think* it's going to work but it's close on some of the spokes. A couple of observations I've made is that there's some variance between spokes of supposedly the same length. I replaced a few that I think actually did bottom out with shorter ones out of the batch I got.

If I were to do it again I'd go with 294 or 293 mm spokes.
It should be pretty obvious when the spoke bottoms out: the nipple suddenly becomes a lot harder to turn in the direction of tightening, and the spoke will twist like mad (you could put a Sharpie dot on the spoke to watch it wind up), but the nipple will still turn reasonably in the other direction. How much spoke is sticking out of the ends of the nipples at this point?

Do you have a measurement for how much of the spoke is threaded? I'm curious if maybe the wrong length nipples were included. It's also possible that you're the victim of production tolerances -- rims can vary between the beginning and end of a production run (Sun rims are known for this), so your rim might not match someone else's ERD measurement.

If you're getting really close to final tension when the spokes are bottoming out, one alternative to re-threading the spokes would be to use nipple washers. These ones would give you close to another 2 turns of the nipple, if my math is right.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.