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Where to source a 126 mm OLD freehub?

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Where to source a 126 mm OLD freehub?

Old 10-08-21, 08:16 PM
  #1  
steine13
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Where to source a 126 mm OLD freehub?

Learned Friends:

I have spent quite a bit of time reading up on 7/8/9/10 speed implementations on 126 mm OLD hubs. There's plenty of information... so long as you have the requisite hardware.

However, I can't for the life of me figure out,
(i) where to buy a 126 mm cassettte hub, or
(ii) how to easily slim down a readily available 130mm hub to 126 OLD.

I do not wish to to ' freewheel.'
The reason for this question is that I'm thinking about buying an '84 Cannondale ST400 in decent shape. Re-spacing the frame is out.
Your advice will be appreciated.
cheers -mathias
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Old 10-08-21, 08:24 PM
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How many speeds are you planning on running? I think a Shimano Uniglide hub and freehub may be what you're after.
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Old 10-08-21, 08:26 PM
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My mistake, I should have specified...7spd is the limit of my greed. So 126 should™ be fine.
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Old 10-08-21, 08:29 PM
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There are spacers you can play around with. There's a discussion here: 126mm 8/9 speed upgrade?

If you want to go with a native 7 speed, no problem. If you start adding more cogs, you get a 130mm and replace a spacer with a washer, and re-dish the wheel. You get the extra speeds but the wheel is weaker due to the more extreme dish. That's all theory though: the bikes I buy that are older are steel so I can put in a 130mm rear hub by spreading the frame.

Interesting project though: good luck!
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Old 10-08-21, 08:40 PM
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Other questions, do you need to go to 126 or would you consider doing 128 and "jamming" it into the frame?

Also, do you need a really strong, not too heavily dished wheel (loaded touring, really rough gravel)?
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Old 10-08-21, 09:05 PM
  #6  
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They're basically unavailable new, and a little difficult to find used/NOS. If you shorten a 130mm hub you end up still having a 8/9/10 sp freehub and therefor crazy uneven spoke tension. I would only do this if you wanted to run more than 7 speeds. If doing this I would:
-Use a ton of spokes--36, or more.
-Use double butted spokes, at least on the NDS.
-Build with pretty high tension.
-Use an asymmetrical rim.
-Measure actual dropouts, and space hub 1-2mm larger to very gently stretch the frame when inserted. This would be done by sanding down the NDS spacer(s) or replacing with spacers 3-2mm smaller.
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Old 10-08-21, 09:22 PM
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Are you set on an ‘84 Cannondale?

I have an ‘86 and an ‘88. My ‘86 is just under 126mm. I can fit a slightly less than 128mm into my ‘88 without forcing it at all.

You can probably stuff a 130mm into a 126mm Cannondale, and many will testify to doing so.

I’m in the 128mm or less camp. Getting to 128mm, or less, is pretty easy to do by either swapping out the locknuts or removing, or swapping, the 1.0/1.2mm washers. I found some locknuts that are around 3.5mm and just swapping out 4.5mm ones gets you there.

Personally, I’ve run a 7 speed freehub body off an M732 and mated it to a DA FH-7700 to under 127mm. I’ve also used an M760 with a couple shims, between the body and hub, in that same hub to run an 8 speed cassette just under 128mm.

A 1055/DX-650 7 speed body on 5700 hub was about as easy as it gets and under 128mm.

Ebay will probably be your best bet for what you need. Only problem is things that used to be cheap are expensive.

I also found stainless shim washers in various diameters and thicknesses on eBay from overseas; .2mm, .3mm, .5mm.

Last edited by 70sSanO; 10-08-21 at 09:28 PM.
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Old 10-09-21, 02:20 AM
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Plenty of cheap enough 126mm hubs.
Swap over the required items.
Seals axles cones etc.
130mm to 126mm is too much dish
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Old 10-09-21, 05:12 AM
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Just in case none of the above ideas work out for you, fitting a 130 hub in an old Cannondale is a non-issue. Finger pressure and you can see dozens of examples if you search the C&V section. Not to discourage you from fiddling with your hub if that's what you want....
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Old 10-09-21, 02:41 PM
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Had the same problem with my 1985 Fuji and wasn't successful locating a 126 freehub. Ended up purchasing a basically NOS 1986 Schwinn that had a 126 rear wheel (freewheel) in near new shape. Good luck in your search.
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Old 10-09-21, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Just in case none of the above ideas work out for you, fitting a 130 hub in an old Cannondale is a non-issue. Finger pressure and you can see dozens of examples if you search the C&V section. Not to discourage you from fiddling with your hub if that's what you want....
This. Have done it literally dozens and dozens of times with no negative impact over tens of thousands of miles.
Just go 130mm, it slides in with minimal pressure- only 2mm per side- and you can run 6-7-8-9-10 speed cassettes.
My personal ST with 10 speed Shimano has well over 10,000 miles on it, no problems.
So, there’s that.
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Old 10-09-21, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by steine13 View Post
Learned Friends:

I have spent quite a bit of time reading up on 7/8/9/10 speed implementations on 126 mm OLD hubs. There's plenty of information... so long as you have the requisite hardware.

However, I can't for the life of me figure out,
(i) where to buy a 126 mm cassettte hub, or
(ii) how to easily slim down a readily available 130mm hub to 126 OLD.

I do not wish to to ' freewheel.'
The reason for this question is that I'm thinking about buying an '84 Cannondale ST400 in decent shape. Re-spacing the frame is out.
Your advice will be appreciated.
cheers -mathias
I'll defer to the guys who say you can gently spread the dropouts and use a modern 130mm wheel in your bike without issue...

...but if you want to stick to 126mm(ish), search eBay for "1055 hub", "rx100 hub", "6401 hub", "shimano rsx hub", etc. I was able to find a fair number of 126mm rear hubs that would take a 7-speed cassette. As long as they weren't abused in their past life, a clean and regrease should keep them going indefinitely!
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Old 10-10-21, 01:07 AM
  #13  
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The more I think about your situation the less I think looking for a 126mm freehub wheel is a good idea. They were only made for a few years and good ones are getting tougher and tougher to find.

While I may not have embraced the 130mm in 126mm, I have no problems going that route especially with so many people using them in older Cannondales.

My personal choice of 128mm is based on what manufacturers have recommended. In the late 80’s, many frames were made with 128mm dropouts with the intend of fitting a 130mm or 126mm wheel in the same frame. There was no concern with a 2mm spread even with bonded carbon fiber tube bikes.

Likewise, sometime in the 2000’s, maybe earlier, some touring bikes were made with 132.5mm dropouts so a 135mm or 130mm wheel could be used. That 2.5mm spread was not a problem for manufacturers.

I’d probably go as far as saying that you could take 2mm off the NDS and re-dish the wheel 1mm if fitting a 130mm wheel seemed too much of a spread. While NDS adjustments are not usually recommended, there are most likely any number of bikes out there with dishing off by 1mm and are being ridden.

John
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Old 10-10-21, 08:11 PM
  #14  
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Thank you very much to everyone who responded.

This was educational. My takeaway is that fitting a 130 mm wheel will be OK without respacing, that 126 mm OLD hubs/wheels are out there but take a bit of scrounging, but that fitting a 130 mm hub and slimming it down on the non-drive side would be a poor choice. All of this makes sense to me. Ironically, I'd be perfectly fine with seven speeds for this bike, AND I have a fresh 130 mm modern 105 hub in the parts bin... so swapping the freehub body for a 7speed would be easy AND lose 4 mm of width on the 'less dish' side.

However. The evening I posted my question, I drove an hour to grab a '96 T400 for my daughter, so I now have five (5) Cannondales in the garage, and four of them have 135 mm wheels. At least for now, I'm not going to pursue an early bike. A few days ago, I broke a spoke in a problematic wheel, and I'd like to just rebuild the whole thing with new spokes, but I cannot find 50 292 mm double-butted spokes for love or money -- everyone is sold out. So this is not the time to get clever with parts mixing.

Yesterday, I rode 65 miles with two old friends, and we were on Cannondale touring bikes -- a 93, a 95, and a 2000 -- and that really brought home how well these ride. I could use another one to park at my folks' house, and I will keep looking, but if at all possible, I'll stick with 135 mm hubs, so every upgrade does not turn into a dissertation.

Again: Thank you very much for the insightful comments.
cheers -mathias
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Old 10-10-21, 10:12 PM
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Try bikehubstore.com, I've been using their industry distributor offshoot site a lot for for all the spokes that have been hard to source.
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Old 10-11-21, 05:56 AM
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Out-standing, cpach!

Order placed -- 40 Sapim 2.0 mm/1.8 mm (14/15) double butted spokes, thirty-two bucks plus shipping.
I'll build up my trouble wheel and depending on what I learn, I'll open a thread about that particular adventure.

Thanks again!
-mathias
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Old 10-11-21, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by steine13 View Post
Learned Friends:

I have spent quite a bit of time reading up on 7/8/9/10 speed implementations on 126 mm OLD hubs. There's plenty of information... so long as you have the requisite hardware.

However, I can't for the life of me figure out,
(i) where to buy a 126 mm cassettte hub, or
(ii) how to easily slim down a readily available 130mm hub to 126 OLD.

I do not wish to to ' freewheel.'
The reason for this question is that I'm thinking about buying an '84 Cannondale ST400 in decent shape. Re-spacing the frame is out.
Your advice will be appreciated.
cheers -mathias
Originally Posted by steine13 View Post
My mistake, I should have specified...7spd is the limit of my greed. So 126 should™ be fine.
you would need to look used. I would suggest looking for ultegra 6400/600 tricolor hub. https://velobase.com/ViewComponent.a...9-0df1afa9bef0

I had those on my 89 miyata 1400...great hubs and HG. 126mm so no issues with jamming or redoing or redishing

C&V for sale might be a good place to start with a WTB. here is a recent example
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Old 10-11-21, 10:33 AM
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As far as using an 8/9/10 configuration on 126mm, it is possible, as long as you also use an Off Center or Asymmetric rim. (Velocity A23, older Velocity Aerohead, Some DT models, and others).

Look for hubs that have full threaded axles which will allow moving spacers around, and trimming the axles as needed. If you have steel dropouts, you'll have to cut a couple of mm off of the axle. If you have aluminum or carbon dropouts, you may be able to simply recenter the axle.

If you want to convert to 7-speed, It looks like I'm seeing 7-speed freehub bodies popping back up on E-Bay.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/274930718642

What they have listed as "Type B" will work with a great number of Shimano 8/9/10 speed hubs with a little tinkering.

The 11 speed hubs are different and are not compatible.

Of course, you could also purchase a native 7-speed hub. They're around.
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